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Assessing the built environment's contribuition to sustainable development

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Short presentation on using the Sustainable Building Assessment Tool, SBAT, in developing countries, with particular reference to the Human Development Index, Ecological Footprint and Biocapacity

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Assessing the built environment's contribuition to sustainable development

  1. 1. Assessing the Built Environment’s Contribution to Sustainable Development: The Sustainable Building Assessment Tool Jeremy Gibberd
  2. 2. Assessing the Built Environment’s Contribution to Sustainable Development: SBAT 1. The African Sustainable Development Context 2. Defining Sustainable Development 3. The Sustainable Building Assessment Tool (SBAT) 4. Biocapacity 5. Future Considerations for the Sustainable Building Assessment Tool (SBAT)
  3. 3. Development of the SBAT WWF
  4. 4. The African Context: Human Development Index and Biodiversity
  5. 5. Defining Sustainability Development of the SBAT WWF
  6. 6. Green building performance indicators Environmental Criteria Building Criteria Building Indicators Energy • Greenhouse gas emissions • Lighting power densities • kgC02/m2/year • W/m2 Water • Potable water consumption • L/m2/d Indoor environmental quality • Ventilation rates • Electric lighting levels • Individual comfort control • Daylight • L/s/p • Lux • area (m2) per control • Daylight factor (%) Land • Topsoil • % retained and reused Materials • Recycling • % recycled content Transport • Public transport • Distance (m2), frequency (minutes)
  7. 7. Ecological Footprint – Building implications HDI Criteria Building Criteria Building Indicators Food • Production • Consumption • kg/m2, distance to consumption (km) • % vegetarian, local sourced Shelter • Utilisation, materials • Energy • Area per person (m2) • Energy consumption Mobility • Public transport • Cycling, walking • Air, train travel • Public transport facilities, distance • Pedestrian facilities, distance • Communication technology Goods • Waste • Consumables • Amount produced, % recycled • Amount, energy content Services • Entertainment, leisure • Insurance • Local provision, diversity • Building quality
  8. 8. Human Development Index – building implications HDI Criteria Building Criteria Building Indicators A long and healthy • Health facilities life • Shared access • Healthy food • Facilities (information, equipment) and area (m2) • Person hours per week • Type, availability, affordability Knowledge • Education • Shared access • Construction, facilities training • Building knowledge • Facilities (information, equipment) and area (m2) • Person hours per week • % of working hours available for education, % credit improvement • Building user manual A decent standard of living • Construction / operational labour intensity • Small enterprise support • Inclusion • Person yrs/construction budget • People employed / m2 of building • Number of enterprises supported • Gender parity, environmental access
  9. 9. Sustainable Building Assessment Tool (SBAT) SBAT Light Industrial - Design v.108 Project Address SBAT Chart Actual Target Energy 0.0 4.0 Water 0.0 4 Waste Energy 0.0 3 Materials 5.0 Water 0.0 3 Biodiversity 4.0 0.0 4 Transport Waste 0.0 3.0 Resource use 3.0 3.3 4 Management 2.0 0.0 2 Local economy Materials 0.0 2 1.0 Access 0.0 2.0 Health 0.0 0.0 2.0 Education Biodiversity 5.0 4 Services and Products 0.0 3 Inclusion 0.0 4 Social Cohesion Transport 0.0 3 Resource use Social Cohesion Inclusion Services and Products Education Health Access Local economy Management Environmental, Social and Economic Performance Score Performance Environmental 0.0 Economic 0.7 Social 1.0 Overall performance 0.6 EF and HDI Factors Score Performance EF Factor 0.5 HDI Factor 1.3 Target Compliance % Performance Environmental -100 Economic -74 Social -69 Overall compliance -82 Self Assessment: Information supplied and and confirmed by Self Assessment by: Date Signature Validation: Documentation checked and validated by Validation by: Date Signature Actual Target WA Water 5.0 Objective 14 14 The building minimises the consumption of mains potable water Indicators Potential Actual WA1 WCs Non-waterborne sanitation system is used or only grey/rain harvested water used 2 2 All WCs are dual flush with maximum flush rates of under 4.5L (half flush) and 9L (full flush) 1 WA2 Urinals Waterless urinals are used or only grey/rain harvested water water is used for flushing 1 1 WA3 Wash Hand Basins All taps have a maximum flow rate of less than 6L/minute 1 1 WA4 Showers All showers have a maximum flow rate of less than 10L/minute 1 1 WA5 Irrigation Landscaping does not require irrigation or all requirements met from grey/rain water harvested water 1 1 WA6 Greywater Grey water from over 80% of hand basins and showers reused 2 2 WA7 Rain Water Harvesting 4.0+ L of rainwater harvesting capacity per m2 of useable area 6 6 3.0-3.9 L of rainwater harvesting capacity per m2 of useable area 5 2-2.9L of rainwater harvesting capacity per m2 of useable area 4 1-1.9L of rainwater harvesting capacity per m2 of useable area 3 0.5-0.9 L of rainwater harvesting capacity per m2 of useable area 2
  10. 10. SBAT Target setting feature
  11. 11. Loss of biocapacity • Biocapacity: The capacity of ecosystems to produce useful biological materials and to absorb waste materials generated by humans, using current management schemes and extraction technologies. Global Footprint Network
  12. 12. Recognising the benefits of biodiversity United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity
  13. 13. Sustainable Building Assessment Tool: Future Considerations Increased emphasis on Biocapacity • Promoting the use of grown materials • Supporting the integration of ecosystems into development in order to support local ecosystem services as well as the provision of food, health and livelihoods • Drawing on local indigenous knowledge • Ensuring that local communities are involved in development and benefit from this Linked measures and positive feedback loops • Demonstrate how addressing biocapacity can lead to improved social and economic benefits • Indicate how positive feedback loops could work: increasing biocapacity leads to social and economic benefits, leads to reduced environmental impacts, leads to improved biocapacity..

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