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Developing Social Media Content

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Presentation for COMS632 class.

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Developing Social Media Content

  1. 1. Developing SocialMedia Content Jessica Hagman COMS 632 August 04, 2012
  2. 2. ObjectivesDraft a basicsocial mediacontent plan
  3. 3. ObjectivesGenerate Facebook,Twitter & YouTubecontent ideas for anorganization
  4. 4. ObjectivesIdentify strategies formonitoring stakeholdersentiment via socialmedia
  5. 5. Oops.
  6. 6. Why SocialMedia? Connect with stakeholders accomplish organizational goals
  7. 7. FacebookTwitter Website or blog YouTube
  8. 8. Twitter
  9. 9. Facebook
  10. 10. YouTube
  11. 11. Share | Listen | Engage
  12. 12. Share | Listen | Engage
  13. 13. ―I‘m suggesting that if you can‘t imagineanyone linking to your coverage — if youcan‘t imagine anyone saying ―this wasnew,‖ ―this is good,‖ ―this wasvaluable,‖ ―go here for more,‖ ―I didn‘tknow this,‖ or ―you should know this‖ —then chances are, it‘s not worth sayingand in the link economy it won‘t getaudience, and so it‘s not worth making.‖ Jarvis, 2008
  14. 14. Unless you arealready famous,you will need otherpeople to mentionyou in order to gainfollowers. Givethem a reason to.
  15. 15. ―Trust agents have establishedthemselves as being non-sales-oriented, non-high-pressuremarketers. Instead they aredigital natives using the Web tobe genuine and humanize theirbusiness.‖ Smith & Brogan, 2010
  16. 16. tv.winelibrary.com
  17. 17. Content Ideas forYour Organization
  18. 18. Lists
  19. 19. answer questions
  20. 20. how-tos
  21. 21. in the news
  22. 22. Share | Listen | Engage
  23. 23. ―The concept of listening, on theother hand, invokes the moredynamic process of onlineattention, and suggests that it isan embedded part of networkedengagement – a necessarycorollary to having a ‗voice‘.‖ Crawford, 2009
  24. 24. Google Alerts
  25. 25. Twitter Search
  26. 26. 3 rd Party Tools
  27. 27. Share | Listen | Engage
  28. 28. Conversation > broadcasting
  29. 29. Information Community Action
  30. 30. InformationCommunity Action
  31. 31. Although nonprofit organizations havebecome more interactive in their useof Twitter as opposed to their websitesalone, we found Twitter is still used bymany nonprofit organizations as anextension of information-heavywebsites. These organizations aremissing the bigger picture of its uses asa community-building andmobilizational tool. Lovejoy & Saxton, 2012
  32. 32. Mention and Be Mentioned
  33. 33. ―So, how do you getretweeted andmentioned? Primarily byretweeting andresponding to others.‖ Mansfield, 2012
  34. 34. Your Turn
  35. 35. BibliographyFacebook. (2012). Key facts. Retrieved fromhttp://newsroom.fb.com/content/default.aspx?NewsAreaId=22Jarvis, J. (2008). The journalism of filling space and time. Retrieved fromhttp://buzzmachine.com/2008/11/04/the-journalism-of-filling-space-and-time/Lovejoy, K., & Saxton, G. D. (2012). Information, community, and action:How nonprofit organizations use social media. Journal of Computer-MediatedCommunication, 17, 337–353. doi:10.1111/j.1083-6101.2012.01576.xMansfield, H. (2012). Social media for social good  a how-to guide for :nonprofits. New York: McGraw-Hill.YouTube. (2012). Press statistics. Retrieved fromhttp://www.youtube.com/t/press_statistics/

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