Greening the Energy Retrofit

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Green seems to be the one area of the construction industry insulated from the downturn. Learn more about the biggest trend in the building and remodel industry in a fast paced, interesting seminar from an industry expert . Some great hands-on and DIY information.

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  • Greening the Energy Retrofit

    1. 1. GREENING THE ENERGY RETROFIT
    2. 2. Class Sponsors Nevada Housing Division Nevada State Office of Energy
    3. 3. Speaker Barbara Collins, ERH West bcollins@erhwest.com www.erhwest.com  Building Science Consultant  Certified Green Building Verifier  Certified HERS Rater  Energy Star Homes Partner
    4. 4. Class Objectives  Some Green Building basics  Understand how to incorporate some green building to enhance your business  Ventilation, VOCs, building materials  Where to find additional resources  www.slideshare.net
    5. 5. "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.“ Socrates
    6. 6. Who are these Green Superstars?
    7. 7. Who are these Green Heroes? Mike Duke, CEO Walmart Al Gore, Former VP, Nobel Winner
    8. 8. Harvard Business Review “Sustainability is the new Megatrend” World’s largest retailer - Walmart Largest consumer products company - Proctor & Gamble
    9. 9. Walmart Embraced Sustainability Plan in 2005 Reduce carbon emissions, save money Found savings in trucking, refrigeration, energy, lighting, etc. Local products, e.g. produce, 100 million fewer trucking miles 4.8 billion less bags last year
    10. 10. Walmart 3 Goals for Walmart and its Suppliers -100% renewable energy -Zero waste -Sustainable practices for customers & employees
    11. 11. McGraw-Hill 2008 Construction Survey “We have hit the tipping point for builders going green.”
    12. 12. McGraw-Hill 2009 Construction Survey “Green seems to be one area of construction insulated by the downturn…In fact, green building has grown in spite of the market downturn.”
    13. 13. Builder Magazine  55% of Generation Xers said it was very important or extremely important to have a healthy, sustainable or green house
    14. 14. McGraw-Hill Construction Survey “The higher quality associated with green building appears to be the key factor driving demand going forward at a time when homes need to stand out in a market with a glut of inventory.”
    15. 15. “Whew! For a minute there I thought we were in trouble!”
    16. 16. Rule # 1  What NOT to say to a homeowner, potential client RETROFIT AUDIT
    17. 17. All together now - What to say when talking to homeowners UPGRADE ENERGY ASSESSMENT
    18. 18. LBNL Study of Effective Messaging Health Benefits Improved Comfort Community Pride
    19. 19. GREEN BUILDING  Green building is fundamentally quality design, construction and maintenance  It is not all about the publicized rarities (straw bale, rammed earth, composting toilets)  It is about education and improvement at and beyond the building code
    20. 20. Good Resource for Novice to Expert National Green Building Standard  Developed by consensus committee with International Code Council (ICC) 2008 • First Green Building Code Certified by American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2009
    21. 21. International Code Council (ICC)  Develops residential and commercial building codes  Most U.S. cities, counties and states that adopt codes choose the International Codes developed by the International Code Council.
    22. 22. Consensus Committee 42 Representative Organizations  American Institute of Architects (AIA)  American Gas Association (AGA)  Gas Appliance Manufacturers (GAMA)  US Green Building Council (USGBC)  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)  Department of Energy (DOE)  Other Green Programs, Cities
    23. 23. National Green Building Standard Goals  Move the practice of green building into the mainstream  Promote and educate so green practices become part of the everyday process of home building and remodeling
    24. 24. Resource for Contractors & Remodelers  ICC-ANSI National Green Building Standard – Get advice, information, look up question – Evaluate a project – Get certification www.nahbgreen.org Go to Scoring Tool
    25. 25. Can be used for  Remodeling/Renovation  Additions  New homes  Multi-family buildings  Land Development
    26. 26. Categories Lot Design, Preparation &Lot Design, Preparation & DevelopmentDevelopment Resource EfficiencyResource Efficiency Energy EfficiencyEnergy Efficiency Water EfficiencyWater Efficiency Indoor Environmental QualityIndoor Environmental Quality Home Owner EducationHome Owner Education Location, Erosion control, Impacts,Location, Erosion control, Impacts, LandscapingLandscaping Recycled, Renewable, LocalRecycled, Renewable, Local Material usageMaterial usage High performance, QualityHigh performance, Quality installation, Renewablesinstallation, Renewables Low flow, Landscaping, Gray waterLow flow, Landscaping, Gray water IAQ, Source control, OccupantIAQ, Source control, Occupant comfort, Moisture controlcomfort, Moisture control Owner’s Manual, Operation,Owner’s Manual, Operation, MaintenanceMaintenance
    27. 27. Remodel / Renovation  Divides buildings by date permitted  Pre-1980  1980 on
    28. 28. Green Remodeling Pre 1980 Home This path has 3 required elements: 1. Reduction in both Energy & Water use Bronze Silver Gold Emerald 20% 34% 43% 50% 2. 5 mandatory Indoor Environmental Quality practices 3. Permitted before 1980
    29. 29. Mandatory IAQ Measures  Natural draft space heating or water heating equipment not in conditioned space or in sealed mechanical room  No wall-to-wall carpeting next to water closets or bathing fixtures  Newly installed carpet, pad, and adhesives must be low VO emission  Spot ventilation - all baths & dryer exhaust outside  HVAC system protection measures  Gas dryer inside the living space has sealed exhaust vent
    30. 30. Energy EfficiencyEnergy Efficiency
    31. 31. The cheapest kilowatt or Btu is the one you don’t use
    32. 32. Energy Efficiency • Optimize efficiency cost effectively and get the most Green benefit • Comprehensive home energy assessment, whole house approach
    33. 33. Whole House Approach  Views the house as an integrated system of components  Increase home quality and performance at less cost  Produce more affordable, comfortable homes
    34. 34. Components for Home Energy Efficiency  HVAC System – Design & Installation  Air Leakage Reduction  Quality Insulation Installation  Hot Water Efficiency  Upgraded Windows  Efficient Lighting & Appliances
    35. 35. HVAC System  Poor design and installation increases energy costs 10 –30%  Sizing  Design  Installation
    36. 36. Ductwork  Important energy measure for most homes  Locating inside conditioned space is optimal  Seal joints with mastic not duct tape
    37. 37. Equipment Efficiency  Fuel Choice  High Seer A/C  Heating system AFUE & fan efficiency
    38. 38. Benefits of a High Efficiency Furnace with Electronically Efficient Fan Motor Lower annual operating costs $40-$300 year As low as 80 watts of power to operate Reduced temperature fluctuation Quieter running system Easier to maintain even temperature throughout home Reduced stale air www.ari.org
    39. 39. Equipment Size  Oversizing is common and expensive – upfront and during life  Sizing properly can reduce cost and help pay for increased cost of other efficiency features
    40. 40. Air Leakage  Excess air leakage can increase heating & cooling by 30%  Seal at connections between the house and the foundation, attic and intentional penetrations  Reducing leakage typically very cost effective
    41. 41. Insulation Installation  Gaps and compressed areas can cut the R- value by 25%.  Poor installation causes comfort problems  Look at cost-effectiveness of increases over IECC
    42. 42. Hot Water  Hot water for a family of 4 costs $$  Look at Efficiency Factor of water heater (0.62+)  Very high efficiency tankless, condensing  Install low flow showerheads, convection traps in hot and cold water lines
    43. 43. High Performance Windows  Reduce energy bills significantly, increase comfort  May permit smaller & cheaper HVAC  Look for U-value .35 and SHGC .30 or less
    44. 44. Lighting  Specify compact or tubular fluorescents for fixtures, occupancy sensors  Include exterior lights, motion sensors  Save on electric bills, plus less heat is generated, house stays cooler  Long life
    45. 45. Appliances  Choose Energy Star refrigerators, clothes washers, and dish washers  Look for efficient dryers
    46. 46. Renewable Energy PV Other Renewable
    47. 47. Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency www.dsireusa.org
    48. 48. Resource EfficiencyResource Efficiency
    49. 49. Resource Efficient Materials  Products containing fewer materials used to achieve the same end-use requirements as conventional products  Lighter, thinner brick  Engineered wood or engineered steel products  Roof or floor trusses
    50. 50. Sustainably Harvested Materials  Specify rapidly renewable building materials – Floor coverings: bamboo, cork, linoleum flooring, wool carpet, recycled-content carpet, carpet tiles  Use sustainably harvested wood
    51. 51. Materials Reuse & Local Materials  Use or donate salvaged, refurbished, reused materials – Flooring, doors, windows, cabinetry, decorative architectural items  Use building materials with recycled content – Carpet, OSB and MDF
    52. 52. Regional Materials  Extracted, processed, and manufactured within 500 miles  Such as concrete, drywall, flooring, insulation, roofing, and/or siding
    53. 53. Recycled Construction Waste On site recycling
    54. 54. Recycled Construction Waste  Construction waste management plan to recycle or salvage construction waste
    55. 55. Recycled Construction Waste
    56. 56. Indoor Environmental QualityIndoor Environmental Quality
    57. 57. A Founding Father Weighs in on IEQ I am certain that no air is so unwholesome as air in a closed room that has been often breathed and not changed.” - Ben Franklin
    58. 58. “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy” - Ben Franklin
    59. 59. Why is Indoor Air Quality Important?  EPA ranking of health risks of 26 leading environmental hazards - #1 concern was indoor pollution  Indoor air quality has been demonstrated to be many times worse than outdoor air quality  We spend 90% of our day inside
    60. 60. Control indoor sources of pollution - Building Materials  Reduce or eliminate building materials that emit pollutants  Formaldehyde - colorless, pungent, and irritating. Volatile organic compound (VOC) used in wood products: particleboard, fiberboard, glues and adhesives, etc.  Formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen
    61. 61. Control indoor sources of pollution - Building Materials  VOCs can cause eye, nose, and throat irritations, headaches, dizziness, visual disorders, memory impairment  Some suspected of causing cancer in animals  Some known to cause cancer in humans
    62. 62. Control indoor sources of pollution - Building Materials  Use low-emitting materials to improve indoor air quality, limit emissions in the dwelling  Green label carpet  Low VOC particle board, MDF and plywood
    63. 63. Ventilation  Serves 3 purposes: – Supply fresh air – Exhaust pollutants – Reduce moisture
    64. 64. Spot Ventilation  Baths & Dryer exhaust must be vented to exterior  Kitchen exhaust, dual speed, should be vented outdoors  Bath and/or laundry timers or humidistat
    65. 65. Energy Star Exhaust Fans  Energy Star or equivalent fans  Energy Star or equivalent plus low sone (less than 1 sone)
    66. 66. Ventilation  ASHRAE Standard 62.2 “Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality”  ASHRAE: American Society for Heating, Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers  ASHRAE develops most national and international standards for the HVAC industry
    67. 67. Ventilation  ASHRAE Standard 62.2  Minimum Ventilation Rate = 1 CFM/100 SF of CFA + 7.5 CFM x occupants (number of BRs + 1)
    68. 68. Ventilation  Example: 2200 SF, 3BR House 1 CFM/100 SF of CFA + 7.5 CFM x occupants (number of BRs + 1)
    69. 69. Ventilation  Example: 2200 SF, 3BR House 22 CFM + 30 (7.5 x 4) 52 CFM
    70. 70. Continuous or Intermittent  Equivalent of 52 CFM of mechanical ventilation must be supplied continuously, 24 hrs a day  An intermittent system can be used as long as the system provides average ventilation at least 20 minutes once an hour  Example: In the same house 156 CFM could be supplied for 20 minutes each hour
    71. 71. Ventilation  Examples of hourly Ventilation Rates: CFA 1 BR 2 BR 3 BR 4 BR 5 BR 1500 30 38 45 53 60 2000 35 43 50 58 65 2500 40 48 55 63 70 3000 45 53 60 68 75 3500 50 58 65 73 80 4000 55 63 70 78 85 4500 60 68 75 83 90
    72. 72. Ventilation Systems  Exhaust  Supply  Balanced
    73. 73. Exhaust Ventilation  Indoor air is continuously exhausted to the outdoors with one or more fans often located in bathrooms.  Home can become slightly depressurized  ASHRAE 62.2 sets a limit on total exhaust, high flow fans, large range hoods and clothes dryers, can create enough negative pressure to create a backdraft if natural draft combustion devices are used in a tight house.
    74. 74. Exhaust Ventilation  Usually Recommended for Cold Climates  Hot, humid climates, may draw hot outdoor air thru holes and cracks in construction assembly, could condense on cool interior surfaces, and cause moisture problems  Not required by 62.2, through-the-wall inlets can be installed in the bedrooms for fresh air  Costs about $15 per year to operate continuously, 24/7.
    75. 75. Exhaust Ventilation Systems Continuously operating, low sone, dual power switch, E Star fan This is an example not an endorsement or recommendation Panasonic WhisperGreen Duct Diameter 4 inch Air Volume (CFM) 80 at .10" pressure 82 at .25" pressure Noise (sones) <0.3 at .10" pressure Power Consumption (Watts) 11.1 at .10" pressure 21.5 at .25" pressure
    76. 76. VENTILATION SYSTEMS  Broan SmartSense®  Program a single control for a ventilation rate to match the size of the home  Automatically coordinates the operation of ventilation fans, running them intermittently when necessary  Six-inch ducting  Engineered for continuous, energy- efficient operation  Ultra-silent operations: 0.3 and 0.7 Sones This is an example not an endorsement or recommendation
    77. 77. Exhaust Systems  Use less than 50 watts during ventilation cycles • Use a Make-up Air Damper to form a complete balanced ventilation system by linking with ventilation fans
    78. 78. Fresh 80
    79. 79. Supply Ventilation  Usually Recommended for Hot or Mixed Climates  Fresh air drawn in through an air intake vent and distributed to many rooms by a fan and duct system  Outside air usually connected to the main return air duct, allowing the HVAC system’s fan and ducts to distribute the fresh air and it is conditioned and/or dehumidified first
    80. 80. Supply Ventilation  Hot or Mixed Climates  Home can be slightly pressurized, use caution in cold climates where there is a risk of heated indoor air being pushed through any remaining holes and cracks in the construction assembly where it could reach cold exterior surfaces, condense, cause moisture problems.
    81. 81. Supply System Digital Programmable Furnace Fan Timer  Automatically turns the furnace fan on for a set period of time only when it detects the system has been inactive for a set period of time  Controls a motorized damper in a fresh air supply duct that is connected with the AHU return plenum  AHU fan 400+ watt motor working , 650+ watt motor start
    82. 82. Balanced Ventilation Systems  Recommended for All Climates  Equal quantities of air are supplied and exhausted (within 10%)  Usually 2 fans - Fresh air in and Exhaust  Energy Recovery Ventilation (ERV)  Heat Recovery Ventilation (HRV)
    83. 83. ERVs  Transfer heat and moisture between exhaust air and incoming air  Additional savings in humid climates, reduces moisture incoming air; reduces load on cooling equipment or need for a dehumidifier  More comfort in the winter, added moisture from the outgoing air to the incoming air; helps avoid excessively dry indoor air
    84. 84. HRVs  Transfers heat from exhaust air to incoming air during heating season  From incoming air to exhaust air in air conditioning season  Reduces the heating and cooling load  Improves comfort
    85. 85. Additional Resources  www.ashrae.org  www.hvi.org  www.energystar.gov/ia/products
    86. 86. WaterWater EfficiencyEfficiency
    87. 87. Water  Less than 1% of freshwater is usable, amounting to only 0.01% of the Earth’s total water  More than one billion people do not have access to clean drinking water
    88. 88. “The West – where whiskey is for drinking and water is for fighting over ” – Mark Twain
    89. 89. Energy is Hidden Cost of Water To Save Energy, Save Water
    90. 90. Embodied Energy in Water  Pumping from Source and for Distribution – Each gallon weighs 8 pounds  Water Treatment to Purify – Potable – Wastewater
    91. 91. Embodied Energy in Water  U.S. water supply and treatment facilities use about 56 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) per year  Enough electricity to power more than 5 million homes for an entire year
    92. 92. Water Efficiency  Accomplish typical tasks using the least amount of water  Don’t change behavior, change the fixtures, appliances and other water using devices
    93. 93. Water Efficiency  Green buildings reduce water use both indoors and out  More efficient water delivery systems indoors  Water smart irrigation  Native and drought-resistant landscaping choices outdoors
    94. 94. Water Efficient Appliances – Dishwashers – Clothes washers 45% less energy and 50% less water
    95. 95. Low Flow  Showerheads 2.0 – 2.5 gpm 1.6 – 2.0 gpm
    96. 96. Faucets  Low Flow – 1.5 gpm or less  Self closing valve  Motion sensor  Pedal activated Close when released or have a default time shut-off
    97. 97. Irrigation Systems  About 40% to 60% of our potable water is used outdoors  Substantial Savings Potential – up to 50% of water loss due to evaporation, mist, surface runoff or wind interference can be eliminated
    98. 98. Landscapes  Zone separately for turf and bedding  Use native, low- water use, bio- diverse, nonallergy landscaping
    99. 99. Irrigation Systems  Smart controller
    100. 100. Homeowner EducationHomeowner Education
    101. 101. Homeowner EducationHomeowner Education  Improper or inadequate maintenance defeats efforts to create a resource-efficient building – Appliances and settings – Air filter change – Water heater settings – T-stat – Lighting controls – Fan controls
    102. 102. Homeowner Booklet  Great marketing tool  Referrals  Additional work
    103. 103. You wouldn’t believe the dinosaurs I used to work with
    104. 104. Thank You Barbara Collins, Senior Building Science Consultant ERHWest.com bcollins@erhwest.com

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