The State of the Electrical/Power Engineering Industry

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  • Total reach to print and online audience is about 200,000 people, which includes 46,000 audited print magazine subscribers, 135,000 e-newsletter subscribers, website visitors, webcast attendees, and social media connections.
  • Our website offers content above and beyond what you see in print. For example, on Feb. 13, we’re hosting a webcast on generators and gensets. We also have e-newsletters, and other Web-exclusive content.
  • We support the engineering community through a couple of our own programs, including 40 Under 40, Product of the Year, and the MEP Giants, which you’ll hear more about later. We also work within the traditional social media outlets. For social media, we’ve found that LinkedIn is the best way to connect with engineers, and allow them to connect with each other professionally.
  • The Consulting-Specifying Engineer audience consists of mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineers who specify engineered systems into nonresidential buildings. Our readers are primarily professional engineers who specify HVAC, electrical distribution, fire/life safety, plumbing and piping, power, building envelope, and lighting systems. These numbers are based on our Verified Audit Circulation report. Note that mechanical products include fire/life safety, HVAC, plumbing, and similar products. 85% of our audience specifies some sort of electrical product, but hold onto that number for a minute, because you’ll see that most of our audience specifies more than one category of products.
  • Consulting engineers make up the bulk of our audited circulation. As you can see here, it’s 53%.
  • This is based on print circulation numbers. Our mailed publication is sent primarily to U.S.-based engineers. Anyone can receive the digital edition, and the website is open to all.
  • This is based on our qualified audience demographics. The big three are offices and industrial facilities, each at about 60%, and educational buildings at 47%. Readers obviously work in more than one building type.
  • At the top of the list: pumps and water supply (54%), electrical distribution (52%), building automation (52%), wiring and cabling (50%), and emergency and standby power (50%).
  • This annual list looks at the top 100 engineering firms, ranked by MEP design revenue. You’ll recognize some of the big names: Jacobs Engineering Group,Black & Veatch,URS,exp,Parsons Brinckerhoff. Download the full list and report at www.csemag.com/giants.
  • Each year we collect information on the MEP Giants, which reflects the top mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and fire protection engineering firms in North America. These percentages shift only slightly from year to year. In 2013, we recorded about 60,000 engineers working at these 100 firms.
  • This is based on the 100 firms that we collect revenue data from. You’ll see that about a quarter of their revenue is based on electrical or power system design. Note, however, that we don’t ask about integrated systems, such as power and life safety integration, or electrical and building automation integration – the numbers had to equal 100% for each firm.
  • We ask firms to answer about 75 questions, one of which is about technology. Nearly all of the top 100 firms are using CAD, BIM, Revit MEP, and energy analysis software. Slightly lower on the list is project management and computational fluid dynamics software.
  • We ask the top firm this question every year, and the numbers have stayed consistent—even through the recession—year over year. They move a couple of percentage points, nothing statistically striking.
  • You’ve probably seen nonresidential construction index data like this. These numbers start in 2009, when the index was below 50, meaning a contraction in the market. The market has been slowing bouncing upward—above 50—since early 2010, but there are still some dips.
  • This data from IHS came out in November 2013. Generac doesn’t really work in this area, but you should see where this portion of the market is going.Their data relies on 2012 manufacturer data, so you may have already seen some of this. To me, the most interesting part of this projection shows that both the Americas and EMEA (Europe, Middle East, Africa) regions will increase, while the huge spike we’re about to see in Asia will dramatically decrease. They define high-power generators as having a power rating from 65.1 MVA to >1000 MVA (that’s mega-Volt amp) and a voltage rating of 1 kV and above.
  • Again, we’re looking at revenue from 2012. IHS defines a medium-power generator as a “synchronous or asynchronous electrical rotating machine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy with a power rating from 1 MVA to 65 MVA and a voltage rating of 1 kV and above.”Interesting to note here: high 2012 revenues in the EMEA region. Opposite of the high-power generator projections, IHS predicts that Asia will see growth in 2013 for the medium-power market.
  • This shows the world market for low-voltage generators. Oil and natural gas are growing the most with a projected compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6.6%. Power plants have a projected CAGR of 5.1%. Other big CAGR numbers: data centers at 6.5%, and combined heat and power (CHP) at 5.3%.
  • If you remember back to the beginning, we said that 85% of our total audience specified more than 1 type of product. Well now we’ve narrowed the audience, and we’re working with only those who specify electrical/power products. The top 3 products in which respondents reported currently specifying are: circuit breakers, fuses, etc. (91%); electrical distribution (90%); and cable, wire, etc. (88%). Today, we’ll talk about 5 areas: electrical distribution, emergency and standby power (88%), transfer switches (85%), electrical generation (60%), and engines (29%).
  • The top 3 factors in which respondents reported being very important in the specification of electrical or power systems are: product quality (77%); service support (47%); and manufacturer’s reputation (45%).
  • The top 3 challenges in which respondents reported being moderately or extremely difficult are: inadequate budget for good design (85%); speed of project delivery (71%); and interoperability and complementing systems (54%).
  • Side note: Consulting-Specifying Engineer readers are some of the most responsive readers in the industry. Not only do they renew their subscriptions promptly, they often ask for the publication in multiple formats: in print and digitally. We just started offering the option to qualified subscribers to receive the publication both ways, and right out of the gate, 7% want it in print and digitally.
  • The State of the Electrical/Power Engineering Industry

    1. 1. The State of the Electrical/Power Engineering Industry January 24, 2014
    2. 2. Amara Rozgus Editor in Chief/Content Manager Consulting-Specifying Engineer and Pure Power www.csemag.com arozgus@cfemedia.com
    3. 3. Consulting-Specifying Engineer
    4. 4. www.csemag.com
    5. 5. Supporting the engineering community
    6. 6. Audience Products specified 42000 40000 38000 36000 34000 32000 30000 Mechanical Electrical Mechanical and electrical
    7. 7. Company/firm types In-House Engineering, 1 7% Architectural/ Engineering, 1 1% Design/ Build, Construc tion/ Contracting, 19 % Consulting Engineer, 53%
    8. 8. Firm location Canada, U.S. Territories, etc ., 5.5% Mountain, 5.7 Pacific, 13.6 % % New England, 5.8 % MidAtlantic, 15.3 % South Atlantic, 17.6 % East North Central, 15.8 % West South Central, 8.8% East South Central, 4.3% West North Central, 7.6%
    9. 9. Building types Office Industrial/ Manufacturing/ Warehouses Educational Government/ Military Hospitals/Health Care Utilities/ Public Works/ Transportation Research/Laboratories Multi-Dwelling/ Retail/ Restaurants Hotel/ Motel/ Resorts Churches/ Religious Parking Garages/ Service Stations Sports/ Entertainment/ Convention Data Centers Correctional
    10. 10. Products specified Pumps & Water Supply Electrical Distribution Building Automation/Controls Wiring & Cable Emergency & Standby Power Energy Conservation Systems Lighting Indoor & Outdoor Air Conditioning Heating Ventilation Fire Protection Plumbing Electrical Generation Insulation/Sealing Water Pollution or Treatment Communication Systems Security Systems Process Piping Humidification/Dehumidification Refrigeration Cogeneration
    11. 11. Annual list of MEP Giants www.csemag.com/giants
    12. 12. 2013 MEP Giants Fire protection engineers 2% Plumbing engineers 10% Mechanical engineers 45% Electrical engineers 43%
    13. 13. Percentage of MEP design billings Building automation/ controls 5% Commissioning 7% Fire/life safety/security 7% Other 6% HVAC 32% Lighting 7% Plumbing 11% Electrical/power 26%
    14. 14. Software use at MEP Giants firms 120% 100% 99% 99% 97% 96% 92% 80% 69% 60% 40% 22% 20% 0% CAD or other types of design software Building Information Modeling Revit MEP Energy Analysis management, collaboration software Project CFD Other
    15. 15. Poll Are your clients and customers working more on existing buildings or on new buildings? • Existing buildings • New buildings
    16. 16. Poll responses—Generac
    17. 17. Poll responses—MEP Giants Maintenance/ repair/ operation 7% Commissioning/ retrocommissioning 7% Other 2% New construction 42% Retrofit/ renovation 42%
    18. 18. Third-party data • Data from IHS (www.ihs.com), a content partner with Consulting-Specifying Engineer • Data from FMI (www.fminet.com)
    19. 19. Nonresidential construction index (Source: FMI) 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0
    20. 20. High-power generator market (Source: IHS) 60.0% Americas EMEA 50.0% Asia 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 2013 -10.0% -20.0% -30.0% 2014 2015 2016 2017
    21. 21. Medium-power generator market (Source: IHS) 1,200.0 8.0% 2012 Revenues 2013 Growth 7.0% 1,000.0 6.0% 800.0 5.0% 600.0 4.0% 3.0% 400.0 2.0% 200.0 1.0% 0.0 0.0% Americas EMEA Asia
    22. 22. Low-voltage generator market (Source: IHS) Commercial Buildings 9.0% Construction 8.0% Data Centers 7.0% Marine 6.0% Mining 5.0% Oil & Natural Gas 4.0% Power Plants 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0% 2012 -1.0% -2.0% 2013 2014 2015 2016
    23. 23. Electrical and Power Study • • • • Exclusive research Data collected in April/May 2013 476 respondents Only respondents involved in the buying/specifying process for electrical and power products and services were asked topic-related questions.
    24. 24. Respondents • 55% are professional design engineers • 66% have been on the job 20 years or more • 51% are at firms with fewer than 100 employees • 58% have an annual total MEP revenue of less than $5 million • 36% specify more than $5 million in electrical/power systems annually
    25. 25. Electrical/power systems and equipment specified Currently specify 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
    26. 26. Manufacturers involved in specification Never involved 3% Occasionally involved 43% Always involved 5% Frequently involved 49%
    27. 27. Specification factors 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Not important Somewhat important Important Very important
    28. 28. Poll When specifying generators or generator systems, what's the most difficult issue you face? Select one. • Interoperability and complementing systems • Codes and standards changing frequently • Speed of project delivery • Inadequate budget for good design • Energy efficiency
    29. 29. Poll responses—Generac
    30. 30. Poll responses—Electrical/Power Study Interoperability and complementing systems Codes and standards changing frequently Speed of project delivery 5% 9% Not difficult 42% 45% 4% Inadequate budget for good design 2% Energy efficiency 41% 38% 24% Fairly difficult 9% 49% 13% 11% 12% 22% 48% 37% 47% Moderately difficult 38% Extremely difficult 5%
    31. 31. Product payback period Transfer switches, ATS, etc. Less than 6 months 6 to 12 months Emergency and standby power 13 to 18 months Engines 19 to 24 months Electrical generation 25 to 30 months 31 to 36 months Electrical distribution 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 More than 36 months
    32. 32. What makes engineers tick What they need: • Codes and standards updates • Product specifications • Data sheets • How-to articles • Education
    33. 33. What makes engineers tick How they want information: • Trade publications • Sales reps • Online catalogs, directories • Supplier/vendor websites • Colleagues/peers
    34. 34. Mobile tools used by engineers Smart phones and tablets 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% iPhone iPad None Android phone
    35. 35. Thought leadership • • • • Codes and standards Updated product information Educational sessions Media: articles, videos, how-to pieces
    36. 36. Amara Rozgus Editor in Chief/Content Manager Consulting-Specifying Engineer and Pure Power www.csemag.com arozgus@cfemedia.com Sponsored by:
    37. 37. The State of the Electrical/Power Engineering Industry January 24, 2014

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