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Making research valuable to
communities: From social network
analysis to engaged research
Mieke Bourne and Parmutia Makui
What is Social Network Analysis (SNA)?
• A tool to elicit, analyse and visualise social relations and networks
• Origins i...
Application of SNA
• Used in education, health, security etc
• Applied to agricultural systems in smallholder
farming comm...
Process
• In workshop or FG setting discuss relationships between
relevant stakeholders/actors
• Participation at workshop...
Process
• Individuals (from stakeholder groups) fill in
questionnaire for quantitative results
• Questions on contacts, ty...
Data collection and preparation
• Data is either automatically collected using ODK
or entered in excel after collection
• ...
Data analysis and visualization
• The analysis and visual maps to create would
depend on the objective to be investigated
...
Resources
• Detailed descriptions of process can be found at:
Bourne M, Makui P, Muller A, Gassner A .2014. Social network...
Seedling access by men and women in
Machakos, Kenya
Mwingi
Opportunities to extend the tool
• Present networks back to community as basis
for discussion – power of visualisation
• H...
Group discussion
• How can we extend this tool and in what
circumstances would it add value?
• How could this tool measure...
Thank you
Social network analysis
Social network analysis
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Social network analysis

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Making research valuable to communities: From social network analysis to engaged research

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Social network analysis

  1. 1. Making research valuable to communities: From social network analysis to engaged research Mieke Bourne and Parmutia Makui
  2. 2. What is Social Network Analysis (SNA)? • A tool to elicit, analyse and visualise social relations and networks • Origins in sociology and mathematics (graph theory) • Focus on structures and relationships rather than individual actor attributes • Show how actors interact, resources and information move and structure of roles and responsibilities • Actors (social entities) presented as nodes and the connections between them as ties representing the relationship
  3. 3. Application of SNA • Used in education, health, security etc • Applied to agricultural systems in smallholder farming communities recently: – Vulnerability to climate change – Technologies and resources – Agriculture innovation processes
  4. 4. Process • In workshop or FG setting discuss relationships between relevant stakeholders/actors • Participation at workshop/FG advised by key informants and literature • Opportunity for discussion and group understanding
  5. 5. Process • Individuals (from stakeholder groups) fill in questionnaire for quantitative results • Questions on contacts, type, frequency, quality, value and use • Can also complete as survey using ODK
  6. 6. Data collection and preparation • Data is either automatically collected using ODK or entered in excel after collection • Data for SNA is prepared in two different files: – Nodes/Attributes data – had data people interviewed e.g education, gender, social status etc – Ties/Links data – has data on the relationships observed e.g frequency of meeting etc • This data can be prepared in excel spreadsheets.
  7. 7. Data analysis and visualization • The analysis and visual maps to create would depend on the objective to be investigated • Analysis can be done using different software: – UCINET and NetDraw – R Statistical software and R Studio – NodeXL – Gephi – Cytoscape Some of the software are suited to handling data from specific fields.
  8. 8. Resources • Detailed descriptions of process can be found at: Bourne M, Makui P, Muller A, Gassner A .2014. Social network analysis for determining gender- differentiated sources of information and tree seedlings. In: ICRAF, 2014. Catacutan D, McGaw E & Llanza MA (Eds). In Equal Measure: A User Guide to Gender Analysis in Agroforestry. Philippines. Accessible at: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/publication/equal-measure-user-guide-gender- analysis-agroforestry-0 • Description of some key network characteristics and measures: Bourne, M., Gassner, A., Makui, P., Muller, A. & Muriuki, J. 2017. A network perspective filling a gap in assessment of agricultural advisory system performance. Journal of Rural Studies, 50, 30-44. • Guide to stakeholder mapping in the SAIRLA project: Bourne M, Neely C, Winowiecki L, Hughes K. 2016. Guide to Stakeholder Mapping for the project: Brining evidence to bear on negotiated ecosystem service and livelihood trade-offs in sustainable agricultural intensification. World Agroforestry Centre, Kenya. Accessible at: http://www.worldagroforestry.org/sites/default/files/outputs/Guide%20to%20stakeholder%20mapping %202016_final%20uplodad%20for%202017.pdf
  9. 9. Seedling access by men and women in Machakos, Kenya
  10. 10. Mwingi
  11. 11. Opportunities to extend the tool • Present networks back to community as basis for discussion – power of visualisation • Have not done this for gender yet –move beyond disaggregated data • Capture social capital
  12. 12. Group discussion • How can we extend this tool and in what circumstances would it add value? • How could this tool measure social capital? 5 minute discussion with your neighbour and plenary sharing of thoughts
  13. 13. Thank you

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