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Consciousness Society Conference Presentation: Nitric Oxide Spiking and Consciousness

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Consciousness Society Conference June 3-5, 2015
Yale University,
New Haven, CT

Although nitric oxide (NO) has been researched intensively by the scientific community, a little known aspect is that NO spiking underlies shifts in Consciousness. Since ancient times, men and women have sought to achieve what we refer to as altered states of consciousness (ASC) to access, explore, and experience multiple realms of awareness and statebound knowledge including Stillpoints, self and other compassion, as well as states of illumination, transcendence, “Oneness” or “Unity.” A little studied feature of nitric oxide spiking is that it occurs co-terminously with whole brain synchronous states and whenever a Relaxation Response is generated. Although typically measured quantitatively, NO can also be experienced qualitatively, as bodily feltsense phenomena. The Biosonic Otto 128 Hertz kinesthetic tuning fork has demonstrated its ability to consistently spike nitric oxide, subsequently creating a Relaxation Response and corresponding potentials for Whole Brain Synchrony. In this presentation, Dr. Wright will share his views on how tuning forks and other qualitative methods work to directly and indirectly spike NO for healthy well being. Learn how you can become more qualitatively aware of ASC shifts in your own Consciousness and flexibly modify your attentional focus via tuning into your bodily feltsense by achieving a consistently beneficial elevated Relaxation Response that also dissolves stress, anxiety and chronic pain.

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Consciousness Society Conference Presentation: Nitric Oxide Spiking and Consciousness

  1. 1. Nitric Oxide Spiking and Consciousness Robert Wright, Jr., PhD, COFT Consciousness Society Conference Yale University New Haven, CT, June 5, 2015 Copyright © 2015 All Rights Reserved www.StressFreeNow.info
  2. 2. INSIGHT
  3. 3. A Special Thank You To Alan Leslie Combs, Ph.D. Doshi Professor of Consciousness Studies Director, CIIS Center for Consciousness Studies Founder, Consciousness Society Director, Conscious Evolution M.A. Program Graduate Institute of Connecticut. John Beaulieu, N.D., Ph.D. CEO, Biosonics Incorporated NYS Licensed Counselor/Psychotherapist Board Certified Naturopathic Physician Adjunct Professor Integrative Health Studies Sound Healing Emphasis, CIIS
  4. 4. Quotations The biggest deterrent to scientific progress is a refusal of some people, including scientists, to believe that things that seem amazing can really happen. ---George Trimble When the mind becomes attuned, it becomes capable of hearing the voice of the unknown. The sounds which are heard in such a state do not belong to any particular language, religion or tradition. ---Swami Rama After silence that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music. ---Aldous Huxley
  5. 5. Quotations The “problem” of consciousness—and its attendant “problem,” the nature of reality…marks the frontier of human exploration, a frontier that we may never fully conquer….But what makes solving the problem of consciousness so compelling is essentially personal: it would bring meaning for each one of us. It would answer those gnawing existential questions about who we are, how the world works, and what is “real.”….Are we alone in our own solipsistic world, or is the experience of consciousness something we share with those we are pleased to consider sentient beings?....Or is it the very fabric of the cosmos, the Absolute? --Jenny Wade, p. xiii-xiv, Forword, In Alan Combs (2009), Consciousness Explained Better
  6. 6. What Is Nitric Oxide? • In 1998, Robert F. Furchgott, Louis J. Ignarro, and Ferid Murad were awarded a Noble Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their nitric oxide research (Geneeskd, 1998). • Nitric oxide is a gas with the chemical formula NO. • Serves as a signaling molecule in mammals including humans. • Is a short lived endogenously produced gas. • Plays a primarily therapeutic role throughout the body. (Stefano, 2003; Stefano, & Magazine, 2001; Stefano, Benson, Frichionne, & Esch, 2005).
  7. 7. What Is Nitric Oxide? • Discovered as a vasodilator working guanylate cyclase. • Operates as a free radical and free radical scavenger. • Exerts anti-viral properties. • Exerts anti-bacterial properties. • Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement. (Benz, Cadet, Mantinone, et al. 2002b; Shinde, Mehta, & Goyal, 2000).
  8. 8. What Is Nitric Oxide • Can be a toxic air pollutant, e.g. car exhaust fumes. • Plays a major role in the regulation of blood pressure. • Helps prevent blood clotting. • Fast acting: Diffuses over 50uM in seconds. • Intra and intercellular signaling substance. (Benz, Cadet, Mantinone, et al. 2002a; Esch, Stefano, Fricchione, & Benson, 2002; Fricchione, & Stefano, 2005).
  9. 9. Types of Nitric Oxide • There are three (3) forms of nitric oxide (NO): cNOS, eNOS, and iNOS. • The constitutive forms of NO (cNOS and eNOS) generally engender healing effects. • The inducible variety (iNOS) typically has a pro- inflammatory effect when certain events are triggered, e.g. chronic stressors. (Erez, Ayelet, et al., 2011; Esch, Stefano, Fricchione, & Benson, 2002; Fleshner, & Laudenslager, 2004 ).
  10. 10. How Is Nitric Oxide Used? • Used extensively to treat various medical conditions. • Popular erectile dysfunction drugs such as Viagra, Cialis and Levitra work by regulating NO puffing. • Nitroglycerin ameliorates angina pain by supplying NO to the heart. • Controls the effects and activation of norephinephrine processes throughout the brain and CNS including synthesis, release and action potentials. (Stefano, 2003; Stefano, Fricchione, Slingsby & Benson, 2001; Tomasian, Keaney, & Vita, 2000; Young, Chen, & Weis, 2011).
  11. 11. Importance of Nitric Oxide “[NO is] a major biological signaling pathway that has been missed with regard to the way it controls proteins….What we see now for the first time…is that there are enzymes that are removing NO from proteins to control protein activity. This action has a broad based effect, frankly, and probably happens in virtually all cells and across all protein classes. NO is implicated in many disease processes. Sepsis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, Parkinson’s disease, heart failure, malignant hyperthermia – all of these diseases are linked to aberrant NO based signaling” (Duke University Medical Center, 2008, May).
  12. 12. Importance of Nitric Oxide • Protects your body and mind from disease, infections and inflammations caused by stress. • Synchronizes your internal cellular rhythms. • Scavenges free radicals in the body. • Promotes better vascular flow and a healthy heart. • Enhances cellular vitality and fluidity. (Beaulieu, 2005, 2009; Mantione, Cadet, & Zhu, 2008; Mata- Greenwood, & Chen, 2008; Samuelson, Foret, Baim, et al., 2010; Segerstrom, & Miller, 2004; Shinde, Mehta, & Goyal, 2000).
  13. 13. What Is Nitric Oxide Spiking? • Ordinarily cells attempt to keep a state of balance and homeostasis by regulating their release of NO which is called “puffing” or known as spiking. • When we are “in rhythm” the body naturally produces NO inside vascular, nerve and immune cells. • When the NO system is functioning properly, release of NO is cyclic and autoregulatory; generally, this makes us feel good. • This cyclic nature enhances physical and emotional well being and proactively prevents illness and disease states. Scientists use the word “spiking” to describe any process that gets “flatlined” NO to “puff” again. When NO levels spike, you immediately feel relaxed. (Beaulieu, 2005, 2009, 2010; Stefano & Magazine, 2001).
  14. 14. What Is Nitric Oxide Spiking? Endogenous nitric oxide spiking is sometimes referred to as “puffing.” This is gaseous NO in its cyclic and auto- regulatory form which usually takes place in a three (3) step wave phase: one ascending, a stillpoint (pause), another descending, which is a natural healing rhythm. The NO wave spike is short lived, approximately six (6) minutes in length. (Stefano, Salzet, & Magazine, 2003).
  15. 15. Benefits of Nitric Oxide Spiking • Enhances cellular vitality. • Enhances vascular flow especially heart healing. • Boosts immune system by destroying bacteria and viruses at the micro level. • increases ability to prevent and fight infections. • Increases resistance to stress. • Increases resistance to pain in conjunction with endogenous morphine. (Long, Light, & Talbot, 1999; Lowson, 2003; MacMillan, 2012; Northrup, 2008; Pryor, Zhu, Cadet, et al., 2005).
  16. 16. Benefits of Nitric Oxide Spiking • Increases energy levels. • Increases physical and mental stamina. • Sharpens mental clarity. • Diminishes states of depression due to balancing of the autonomic nervous system. • Improves digestion and natural cleansing. (Beaulieu, 2005; Benz, Cadet, Mantione, et al., 2002; Dusek, Chang, Zaki, et al., 2006; Elam, R., et al., 1989; Guoyao, & Meininger, 2000; Guoyao, & Morris, 1998).
  17. 17. Nitric Oxide Wave Spiked by EnRhythm
  18. 18. EnRhthym Nitric Oxide Wave Spiking Explanation Nitric oxide is a molecule created by a nitrogen atom bound to an oxygen atom. It is made in our cells and released into the surrounding tissues as a gas. The release of nitric oxide by our cells is termed puffing by scientists to describe the rising and falling of this gas. The puffing cycle is like a wave which takes three minutes to rise and three minutes to fall. The rising phase of the wave is the release of nitric oxide which sends a signal to our cells to relax. During the falling phase of the wave nitric oxide dissipates and our cells become more active. The calm between the rising and falling we call still point. --John Beaulieu, 2010, Nitric Oxide and Tuning Forks, Biosonics, Inc.
  19. 19. What Is Nitric Oxide Flatlining? • When NO production diminishes or stops completely, this is known as “flatlining.” • Typically this means the NO rhythm has been compromised, often due to unresolved stress or trauma. • Dysfunctional NO production leads to depressed immune system function. • We feel pain or distress. • Flatlined NO may be the body’s cellular response to psychological and physiological stress and stressors in the environment. (Beaulieu, 1987, 2005, 2009, 2010; Esch & Stefano, 2010).
  20. 20. What Is Nitric Oxide Flatlining? • Flatlined NO may be the body’s cellular response to psychological and physiological stress and stressors in the environment. • The main cause of flatlining is unresolved stress and trauma. • Over time, flatlining leads to pro-inflamation and depressed immune function which can result in tissue pathology. (Beaulieu, 2005; Simpkiss, & Devine, 2002; Stefano, & Magazine, 2001; Tseng, Mazella, Goligorsky, et al., 2000; Tomasian, Keaney, & Vita, 2000; Wright, 2012).
  21. 21. Consequences of NO Flatlining? Endogenous nitric oxide flatlining is a state where the cyclic constitutive NO wave is dormant. This is often experienced as pain and/or distress. Chronic flatling may lead to a pro- inflammatory response, triggering release of iNOS which if unabated, may lead to illness and/or disease states. (Beaulieu, 2009; Esch, & Stefano, 2010; Fricchione, & Stefano, 2005).
  22. 22. Consequences of NO Flatlining
  23. 23. Major Disease Byproducts of NO Flatlining • Alzheimer’s disease • Autoimmune Disorders • Motor Neuron Disease • Cancer • Erectile Dysfunction (Beaulieu, 2010, 2005; Erez, Ayelet, et al. 2011; Esch, Stefano, Fricchione & Benson, 2002).
  24. 24. Major Disease Byproducts of NO Flatlining • Diabetes • Depression • Stroke • Heart Attack • Arteriosclerosis (Kal, Van Wezel, Porsius, et al., 2000; Mantione, Cadet, Zhu, et al., 2008; McEwen, 2000; Salamon, Kim, Beaulieu, & Stefano, 2003) ; Seidler, Uckert, Waldkirch, et al., 2002).
  25. 25. Extreme Nitric Oxide Flatlined Visual
  26. 26. How Does Nitric Oxide Work? There are three cell types that are especially controlled by nitric oxide: immune cells, nervous system cells, and the cells that line blood vessels, which are called endothelial or vascular cells. The shape of immune cells changes in the blood stream in response to signals of inflammation. In the normal state, immune cells are round and roll along the lining of blood vessels, not sticking to any of the vascular cells for long. If there is a stress or inflammation present, the cells begin to flatten and become sticky. To make them un-stick and become round again, the immune cells and vascular cells both produce a low level of nitric oxide all the time. As long as they can do this for long enough, the immune cells un-stick and roll away. If nitric oxide release is inhibited, the immune cells begin to invade between the vascular cells and more inflammatory signals are produced. To make matters worse, the immune and vascular cells make one more attempt to release nitric oxide to restore the calm state. At higher levels, however, the nitric oxide itself causes damage to the cells. --John Beaulieu, 2011 (www.biosonics.com/uploads2011/CyclicNitricOxide.pdf)
  27. 27. How Does Nitric Oxide Work? NO secretions take place in a two step phase, one ascending, the other descending: “During the ascending phase of NO release the basal levels of NO may inhibit cellular activity by reducing changes in cell conformation by inhibition of actin polymerization, inactivation of NFkB, inhibition of cell adhesion, and hyperpolorization of post synaptic membranes. The descending phase of NO release may promote cell shape changes by allowing actin polymerization, depolarization, and NFkB signaling” --Stefano, Salzet, & Magazine, 2002
  28. 28. Relaxation Response • A protective mechanism which counteracts stress. • Physiologic counterpart to the “fight or flight” stress response. • Beneficial decreases in metabolism. • Beneficial decreases in blood pressure. • Beneficial decreases in breathing rate. • Beneficial decreases in anxiety. (Benson, 1983, 1997; Benson & Proctor, 2011; Dusek, Chang, Zaki, et al., 2006; Dusek, Out, Wohlhueter, et. al., 2008; Morita, Saito, Ohta, et al., 2005; Nakao, Myers, Fricchione, et al., 2001; Pillay, 2010, 2011).
  29. 29. Relaxation Response • Beneficial decreases in heart rate. • Reductions in psychological distress. • Reductions in chronic pain. • Beneficial decreases in sympathetic nervous system reactivity. • Beneficial increases in parasympathetic system reactivity. • Increases in awareness. (Epel, Blackburn, Lin, et al., 2004; Esch, Fricchione, & Stefano, 2003, 2005; Fields & Levine, 1984; Fleshner & Laudenslager, 2004; Halpern & Savary, 1985; McKinney, Antoni, Kumar, et al., 1997; Willet, 2002).
  30. 30. Relaxation Response • Nitric oxide spiking. • Endogenous morphine spiking. • Increases potential for whole brain synchrony. • Increases capacity for self and other compassion. • Beneficial changes in gene activity opposite those associated with stress. (Iwanaga & Tsukamoto, 1997; Jacobs, Epel, Lin, et al., 2011; Kal, Van Wezel, Porsius, et al., 2000; Kim, Koo, Lee, & Han, 2005; Lazar, Bush, Gollub, et al., 2000; Lazar, Kerr, Wasserman, et. al., 2005; Wright, 2012, 2013).
  31. 31. Benefits of Generating a Relaxation Response by Spiking Nitric Oxide • Provides a boost to immune system functioning, helping the body to ward off sickness and disease • Significantly lowers blood pressure. • Measurable improvements to circulatory and vascular systems. • Enhances mental clarity. • Provides boosts to abstract and spatial memory. (Beary, & Benson, 1974; Benson, 1983, 1997; Benson, & Proctor, 2011; River, 1998; Salamon, Esch, & Stefano, 2006).
  32. 32. Benefits of Generating a Relaxation Response by Spiking Nitric Oxide • Enhances ability to concentrate for goal attainment. • Beneficial increases in sympathetic nervous system responsiveness with resultant improvements in stress hardiness. • Helps to prevent acute stressors from accumulating as debilitating chronic stress. • Improvements in mood and overall sense of well being. (Beaulieu, 2005, 2009, 2010; Fleshner, & Laudenslager, 2004).
  33. 33. Benefits of Generating a Relaxation Response by Spiking Nitric Oxide • Underlies neuroendocrine release for “Flow” states for Peak Performance and Peak Experience. • Neutralizes the harmful effects of over arousal whereby excess amounts of cortisol and adrenaline can damage to the body. • Reduction of chronic pain as well beneficial epigenetic changes to DNA including reshaping amgydala fear reactivity. (Pryor, Zhu, Cadet, et al., 2005; Salamon, Esch, & Stefano, 2006; Salamon, Kim, Beaulieu, & Stefano, 2003).
  34. 34. Relationship Between Endogenous Cyclic Nitric Oxide Spiking and Endogenous Morphine Spiking It has been more than 30 years since morphine was discovered to be an endogenous signal molecule in the body. Since then, the word ‘endorphin’ has been adopted as an abbreviation of ‘endogenous morphine,’ referring to both morphine peptides and morphine itself. Endogenous opiates are released via the descending corticospinal tract, allowing for the body to mediate its own analgesia. Osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMT) has been found to initiate release of nitric oxide (NO), endogenous morphine’s second messenger in the body. Petrozzo et al., 2014 http://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/treatments/pharm acological/opioids/role-endogenous-morphine-nitric-oxide- pain-management
  35. 35. Symptoms Nitric Oxide Spiking Helps Alleviate • Aches & Pains • Headache • Inability to Control your Temper • Insomnia • Lack of Energy • Loss of Appetite
  36. 36. Symptoms Nitric Oxide Spiking Helps Alleviate • Low Back Pain • Low Mood • Migraine Headache • Neck Pain • Overeating • Undue Worry
  37. 37. Sample Conditions Caused or Aggravated by Stress Which Are Helped by NO Spiking • Anxiety • Asthma • Autoimmune Diseases • Cardiovascular Disease • Chronic Pain • Constipation • Diabetes • Diarrhea • Heartburn • High Blood Pressure
  38. 38. Sample Conditions Caused or Aggravated by Stress Which Are Helped by NO Spiking • Infertility • Insomnia • Loss of Sex Drive • Obesity • Skin Problems, e.g. Hives or Eczema • Stroke • Substance Abuse • Ulcers • Weight Gain or Weight Loss
  39. 39. What Is Consciousness? Although problematic, consciousness has been defined by some as the state or quality of awareness of an external object or something within oneself. There is no agreement within the scholarly or scientific communities as to what consciousness is or might be or whether it is essential, luminous, numinous, transcendent or illusory. The conceptual, theoretical, and paradigmatic disagreements and arguments about the true nature of consciousness are vociferous, steadfastly held positions, and often epistemologically, ontologically and teleologically polar opposite perspectives.
  40. 40. Sample Areas of Disagreement • Mutually Exclusive Definitions of Consciousness • Proof of Existence of Consciousness • Mutually Exclusive Definitions of Being • Mind-Body Duality Problem • Hard Problem of Consciousness
  41. 41. Sample Areas of Disagreement • Neural Correlates of Consciousness • Philosophy of Mind Issues • Existence/Non-Existence of a Quantum Mind • Solipsism • Role of the Unconscious in Consciousness • Existence/Non-Existence of Spirit
  42. 42. Consciousness Controversies “Why can’t the worlds greatest minds solve the mystery of consciousness?: Philosophers and scientists have been at war for decades over the question of what makes human beings more than complex robots.” Oliver Burkeman, Jan. 21, 2015 http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jan/21/-sp- why-cant-worlds-greatest-minds-solve-mystery- consciousness
  43. 43. Consciousness Controversies • Dangerous ideas debate with Richard Dawkins and Deepak Chopra from The Chopra Well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6C1P1idmfUM • The War On Consciousness: The Talk That Gave TED Indigestion by Graham Hancock: http://www.grahamhancock.com/forum/HancockG6- TheWarOnConsciousness.php. • Capriles, E. (2009). Beyond Mind III: Further Steps to a Metatranspersonal Philosophy and Psychology. (Continuation of the Discussion on the Three Best Known Transpersonal Paradigms, with a Focus on Washburn and Grof). International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, 28(2), 1-145.
  44. 44. Consciousness Controversies • Is There A Scientific “Taboo” Against Parapsychology? Claims about the "taboo" status of parapsychology lack substance by Scott McGreal: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/unique-everybody- else/201401/is-there-scientific-taboo-against-parapsychology • Cardeña, E. (2014). A call for an open, informed study of all aspects of consciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(17), 1-4. • Combs, A. (2009). Consciousness explained better: Towards an integral understanding of the multifaceted nature of consciousness. St. Paul, MN: Paragon House.
  45. 45. Consciousness Controversies • Cardeña, E. (2011). On wolverines and epistemological totalitarianism. J Sci Explor, 25, 539-551. • Fields, C. (2013). A whole box of Pandoras: Systems, boundaries and free will in quantum theory. Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence, 25(3), 291-302. DOI: 10.1080/0952813X.2013.782981. • Paller, K. & Sukuki, S. (2014). The source of consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18(8), 387- 389. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2014.05.012
  46. 46. Neurophysiological Consciousness Controversy At this point, we would like to raise the following philosophical question: what is the relationship between the mental concept of subjective experience and the concepts or terms we use to describe the organization and function of the brain? This seems to be an important question as our mental categories are essentially responsible for the interpretation of physiological findings and thus form our picture of the mechanisms of the brain. Hinterberger, Zlabinger, & Blaser, 2014. DOI: 10.3389/ fnhum.2014.00637
  47. 47. What Is Attention? In the context of human information processing, attention is the process that, at a given moment, enhances some information and inhibits other information. The enhancement enables us to select some information for further processing, and the inhibition enables us to set some information aside (Stanford, 2006, p. 103). http://wwwpsych.stanford.edu/~ashas/Cognition%20Text book/chapter3.pdf
  48. 48. What Is Attention? • Orienting to sensory events • Detecting signals for focused processing • Maintaining a vigilant or alert state • Endogenous & exogenous attentional processing in time and space • Cocktail party effect • Motion induced blindness (Behrmann, Geng, & Shomstein, 2004; Gopher, 1993; Hirst, 1986; Paller & Suzuki, 2014; Stanford, 2006; Styles, 2005).
  49. 49. Attentional Quotation Humans were never meant to see the world through a lens of chronic fear or other negative emotions. We were meant to experience the world directly as it is. We were meant to form deep connections to other human beings. With attention training…we can open our hearts to experience the fullness of our senses, and reconnect with forgotten parts of ourselves. We can experience moments of unity and transcendence and find the world has been reenchanted. It will be a watershed moment in human evolution when we are able to pay attention to how we pay attention, control our attention, and take personal responsibility for the creation of our own realities. --Fehmi and Robbins 2007, p. 8
  50. 50. Styles of Attention • According to Dr. Les Fehmi of the Princeton Biofeedback Centre there are four main types of attention: • Diffuse • Narrow • Objective • Immersed Fehmi & Robbins, 2007, p. 46-47
  51. 51. Whole Brain Synchrony Viewed as a Way of Paying Attention • Experience of whole brain synchronization enhances healthy well being. • Open Focus is one way to achieve whole brain synchrony without equipment. • Prolonged and excessive stress can negatively impact almost every aspect of your life. • Maintaining a narrow focused attentional style for long periods often leads to chronic stress and pain, and left unattended to, turns into disease states. • Developing attentional flexibility gives you the capacity to enter a beneficial homeostatic state of whole brain synchronization volitionally.
  52. 52. Whole Brain Synchrony • Parts of brain begin to work together harmoniously. • Brain resonance where neurons vibrate at the same frequency. • Neural pathways tend to fire more rapidly. • Brainwave patterns are “in phase” or in synchronized • Also known as “Whole Head Synchrony” or “Whole Brain Functioning” or “Hemispheric Synchronization” or “Whole Brain Synchronization” (Fehmi & Robbins, 2007). (Lutz, Lachaux, Martinerie, & Varela, 2002; Lutz, Greischar, Rawlings, et al., 2004)
  53. 53. Why Whole Brain Synchrony is a Desired and Sought After State • Increased Creativity • Increased Insight • Increased Intuition • Increased Relaxation Response • Increased Accelerated Learning Abilities • Increased Parasympathetic Nervous System Reactivity (Buzsaki, 2006; Damasio, 1990; Fujisawa, & Busaki, 2011; Glaser, Brind, Vogelman, et al., 1992; Gold, 1999; Goleman, 1988; Gruzelier, & Egner, 2005; Gruzelier, Egner, & Vernon, 2006).
  54. 54. Whole Brain Synchrony as a Desired and Sought After State • Increased Mental Clarity. • Increased Ability to Problem Solve. • Increased Self Compassion. • Increased Other Compassion. • Increased Empathy. • Decreased Sympathetic Nervous System Reactivity. (Haig, De Pascalis & Gordon, 1999; Hammond, 2000; Hanajima, Terao, Hamada, et al., 2009; Hinterberger, Zlabinger, & Blaser, 2014; Hutchison, 1996; Jacobs, Epel, Lin, et al., 2011).
  55. 55. Elements of Peak Performance • State where individual performs to the maximum of her ability. • Enhanced level of self awareness. • High levels of confidence and focused concentration upon task completion. • Accomplishment is effortless. • Individual experiences a “flow” state or being “in the zone of excellence.” (Belluscio, M., Mizuseki, K., Schmidt, et al., 2012; Brown, & Gerbarg, 2005; Craqq, 2006; Csikszentmihalyi, 1991, 1997; Draganski, Gaser, Kempermann, et al., 2006; Pillay, 2010; 2011 ).
  56. 56. Elements of Peak Experience • Transpersonal and ecstatic state. • Sense of Unity, Oneness and Awe. • Sense of interconnectedness. • Time perception may be altered to witness time elongation, time quickening and/or timelessness. (Barušs, van Lier, & Ali, 2014; Bird, B., Newton, Sheer, & Ford, 1978a&b; Damasio, 1999; Farrer, & Frith, 2002; Fisher, 1971, 1973).
  57. 57. Elements of Peak Experience • Altered State of Consciousness (ASC). • Therapeutic increases in creativity, compassion for self and others, and personal locus of control (stress reduction). • Self actualization state or individuation (Maslow Level 5). • Personal growth, intrinsic meaning and purpose. (Gelhorn, 1970; Gendlin, 1981; Genz, 1999; Goodman, & Nauwald, 2003; Goodman, 1990; Grof, & Grof, 2010; Lilly, 1977; Maslow, 1971; Momen, 1984; Monroe, 1992; Palmer, 1998).
  58. 58. STILLPOINT
  59. 59. Sample Methods for Spiking Nitric Oxide • Ritual Body Postures • Humming • Drumming • Dietary Supplements • Medications, e.g. Viagra, Ciallis, Levetra • Aromatherapy • Meditation • Neurofeedback (Beaulieu, 2005; Dusek, Chang, Zaki, et al., 2006; Dusek, Hibberd, Buczynski, et al., 2008; Dusek, Otu, Wohlhueter, et al., 2008; Goodman, 1990; Goodman & Nauwald, 2003; Gore, 1995; Maniscalco, Sofia, Weitzberg et al., 2004; Tervaniemi, IIvonen, Karma, et al., 1997).
  60. 60. Sample Methods for Spiking Nitric Oxide • Foods • Yoga • Osteopathic Manipulative Therapy (OMT) • Open Focus • Music Therapy • Exercise • Sunlight (Banth & Arderbil, 2015; Fehmi & Robbins, 2007; Liu, Fernandez, Lang, et al., 2013; McKinney, Tims, Kumar, & Kumar, 1997; Mullooly, Levin, & Feldman, 1988; Narin, Pinar, Erbas, et al., 2003; Petrozzo, Mohr, Mantione, & Goldstein, 2014; Salamon, Kim, Beaulieu, & Stefano, 2003; Women’s Health Encyclopedia, 2012).
  61. 61. Quotation BioSonic research conducted at Cell Dynamics, Inc. demonstrates the release of Nitric Oxide (NO) from various tissue sources. Utilizing an amperometric detection system, allowing only nitric oxide to generate an upward deflection, we measure real-time NO release from living cells and demonstrate that the use the BioSonic Otto™ (128cps), OM Tuner™ (136.1cps) and Body Tuners™ (C256 & G384) tuning forks have the ability to release NO well above baseline pulsatile levels. The release of NO is visualized as a large peak of pure nitric oxide immediately following exposure of these tissues to the vibration/ sound of the tuning forks. Once NO is released it follows a well characterized signaling cascade, exhibiting established properties of NO. --John Beaulieu, 2009, p. 1
  62. 62. Sample Methods for Spiking Nitric Oxide • Biosonic Tuning Fork Series: • Otto 128 • Otto 64 • Otto 32 • OM Tuner • C & G Body Tuners • Fibronacci Series (Beaulieu, 1987, 2005, 2009, 2010; Biosonics, Inc., 2010).
  63. 63. Otto Tuning Fork 128 Hz
  64. 64. Otto Tuning Fork 64 Hz
  65. 65. Comparison of Otto Tuning Forks 128 Hz and 64 Hz
  66. 66. Biosonics Otto 32
  67. 67. Biosonics OM Tuning Fork 136.1 Hz The Swiss scientist Hans Cousto, author of the Cosmic Octave, discovered how to convert planetary cycles into musical pitches. Using his system the sa corresponds to the sound of one Earth year of the time it takes the earth to circle the Sun. To arrive at the frequency of 136.1 Hz, an earth year is reduced to a second (frequencies are measured in cycles per second). An earth year is 365.242 days and an earth day is 86,400 seconds. When the days are multiplies by seconds the answer will be 315,567,925.9747 seconds equal one earth year. To arrive at an audible sound, 315,567,925.9747 seconds are divided into one (year) and then raised 32 octaves. The result will be the audible tone of answer 32 times the result will be 136.1 Hz. The cosmic note OM. (http://www.stressfreenow.info/products/index.php?)
  68. 68. Biosonics OM Tuning Fork 136.1 Hz
  69. 69. Biosonics OM Tuning Fork 136.1 HZ • Achieve a state of deep relaxation in seconds with the primordial vibrations of “Om”. • Physically tune your body to the Om vibration and enter a state of balanced wholeness ideal for healing and higher consciousness. • Helps center the body and mind when placed on the rib heads, thoracic vertebra, sternum, sacrum and illiums. • Helps meditators and yoga practitioners achieve desired states effortlessly. (http://www.stressfreenow.info/products/index.php?main_page =product_info&cPath=1&products_id=2)
  70. 70. Biosonic Body Tuners C & G
  71. 71. Flatlining – Spiking Pathways Nitric Oxide Flatlining Stress and Distress Chronic Pain Nitric Oxide Spiking Stress Reduction Pain Dissolves Homeostatasis Allostasis Healing
  72. 72. Stress Interaction – Part 1 Category of Phenomena Distress Eustress Adrenaline Yes Depends Allostasis No Yes Allostatic Load Increased Diminished Cortisol Yes Diminished Dopamine Yes Depends Endogenous Morphine Yes Depends GABA Diminished Increased Grief Yes No
  73. 73. Stress Interaction – Part 2 Category of Phenomena Distress Eustress Grief Recovery No Yes Homeostasis No Yes HPA Axis Diminished Increased Immune Response Increased Depends Nitric Oxide Flatlined Spiked Nor Adrenaline No Depends Oxytocin Depends Depends SAM Axis Increased Diminished Serotonin Diminished Increased
  74. 74. Nitric Oxide Interaction – Part 1 Category of Phenomena Flatlining Spiking Adrenaline Yes Diminished Allostatic Load Increased Diminished Cortisol Yes Diminished Distress Yes No Dopamine Yes Implicit Endogenous Morphine Yes Implicit GABA Diminished Increased Grief Yes No
  75. 75. Nitric Oxide Interaction – Part 2 Category of Phenomena Flatlining Spiking Grief Recovery No Yes Homeostasis No Yes (Increased) HPA Axis Diminished Increased Nor Adrenaline Increased Diminished Oxytocin Depends Depends SAM Axis Increased Diminished Serotonin Diminished Yes Immune Response Increased Depends
  76. 76. Human Organization Stress Balancing System Homeostatic Balance Dynamic Balance Imbalance Eustress Acute Stress Chronic Stress Homeostasis Allostasis Distress Provides Pathways for Integrative and Holistic Healing Provides Pathways for Integrative and Holistic Healing Provides Pathways for Disease States and Illness Adapted from Stefano, Fricchiconne, and Esch (2006); Stefano et al. (2005).
  77. 77. Ergotropic Pathway Tropotropic Pathway Hyperarousal Hyper- Stimulatory Levels of Statebound Experience Hypoarousal Hypo-Stimulatory Beta Brainwave State Routine Activity Ordinary Waking Consciousness Beta Brainwave State Hi Beta Brainwave State Excitement Daydreaming/Rel axation Hypnotic Trance Alpha Brainwave State High Beta Low Gamma Brainwave State Anxiety/Mania Hypnopompic/ Hypnogogic Imagery-Twilight State Theta Brainwave State Unknown Brainwave State Mystical Experience Ecstatic Trance Bidirectionality Abreaction Mystical Experience Deep Trance or Samadhi Delta Brainwave State Statebound Experience: Comparison of Ergotropic and Tropotropic Pathways Adapted from Fisher (1971, 1973, 1975); Momen (1984).
  78. 78. State Bound Experiential Qualities NO Flatlining NO Spiking Fully Associated Mental Clarity Emotional Clarity Euphoria Mild Delirium Transpersonal Transcendent Experience Sense of Unity Grief/ Mourning/ Bereavement Yes No Yes No No No No No Stress Yes No Yes No No No No No Healing No Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Possible Possible Dopamine Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Oxytocin Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Serotonin Spike No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Endorphin Spike No Yes Depends Yes Yes Yes Yes Possible Attention: Open Focus Global No Yes Depends Yes Yes Possible Possible Possible Pain Yes No Yes No No No No No Fear/Anxiety Yes No Yes No No No No No Lucid Dream State Unknown Unknown Depends Yes Depends Unknown Unknown Unknown
  79. 79. Statebound Experience: SAM AXIS and HPA AXIS Relationships Ergotropic Pathway Tropotropic Pathway Hyperarousal Hyper-Stimulatory Hypoarousal Hypo-Stimulatory Grief Response: Distress, Pain, Anxiety, Fear Increases Relaxation Response/Eustress: Grief, Pain, Anxiety, Fear Dissolves SAM AXIS Reactivity Increases HPA AXIS Reactivity Increases NO Flatlining: Increased Cortisol; Decreased Dopamine/Serotonin NO Spiking/Endogenous Morphine Release Allostatic Loads Increase Allostasis/Homeostasis
  80. 80. Comparative Still Point Induction Techniques “Chaotic Attractor” Technique Induces Still Point Rate of Induction Method Effects/Results Biosonic Otto 128Hz, 64Hz, 32Hz tuning fork Yes Immediate Kinesthetic Spikes NO cycle; boosts to immune function; spikes endogenous morphine; eliminates NO flatlining. Biosonic Otto 128Hz, 64Hz, 32Hz tuning fork Yes Immediate Auditory Sound Waves Spikes NO cycle; eliminates NO flatlining; boosts to immune function; spikes endogenous morphine. Open Focus Technique Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Auditory Verbal Objectless awareness in all sensory modalities, attending simultaneous to background and foreground globally; extreme mental clarity. Brain Pattern Interrupt Technique Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Olfactory Memory Resultant emotional and physical release phenomena disrupt negative valance memory patterns. Shift to positive energy valance can occur instantaneously or over time with repetition. Gamma Brainwave Holosync Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Auditory Sound Waves Attentional shift to states of self compassion and compassion for others: Sense of unity, oneness of being, transcendence; enhanced sense of Being. Standard Hypnosis Yes After Trance Induction Verbal Resultant reframing of negative memories into new behavioral flexibility; extinguishment of phobias or unwanted habits. Ericksonian Hypnosis Yes After Trance Induction Verbal Auditory Use of nonspecific and indirect metaphors results in reframe of negative memories into new behavioral patterns; extinguishment of unwanted behaviors; installation of new and desired behaviors and habits. Halpern Music Yes Repeated Listening Auditory Music Calming of sympathetic nervous system; boost to parasympathetic nervous system; state of relaxed reverie. Relaxation response induced.
  81. 81. Comparative Still Point Induction Techniques “Chaotic Attractor” Technique Induces Still Point Rate of Induction Method Effects/Results Meditation Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Chant, Mantra, or Silence Long-term meditators report heightened mental and emotional clarity, sense of oneness, unity of Being, extreme states of compassion and transcendence. Flotation Tank Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Weight- lessness Systemic boost to HPA axis and simultaneous calming of SAM axis; expansive awareness of space, silence, and timelessness. Anechoic Chamber Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Complete Silence Long term users report awareness of nervous system sounds and induction of relaxation response phenomena. Focusing Yes After Repeated Use Bodily Felt Sense/Verbal Instructions Shift in Awareness Caused by consciously and conscientiously connecting with bodily Felt Sense Alternate Nostril Breathing Yes Immediate Modulation of Breath Immediate state change caused by deep diaphragmatic breathing. Biofeedback Yes Immediate Physiological Body Feedback Increased awareness and ability to modulate aspects of autonomic functions; with practice clients learn to volitionally make beneficial autonomic changes without equipment. Neurofeedback Yes Immediate Brainwave Feedback Increased awareness of brainwave patterns connected to thoughts; with practice clients learn to flexibly modulate brain wave patterns and volitionally modify internal processes without equipment. Holotrophic Breathwork Yes Immediate Modulation of Breath Wide range of breath techniques engenders rebirthing effect; including increased awareness of pre-natal and post-natal birth experiences.
  82. 82. Comparative Still Point Induction Techniques “Chaotic Attractor” Technique Induces Still Point Rate of Induction Method Effects/Results Meditation Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Chant, Mantra, or Silence Long-term meditators report heightened mental and emotional clarity, sense of oneness, unity of Being, extreme states of compassion and transcendence. Flotation Tank Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Weight- lessness Systemic boost to HPA axis and simultaneous calming of SAM axis; expansive awareness of space, silence, and timelessness. Anechoic Chamber Yes Over Time as Proficiency is Achieved Complete Silence Long term users report awareness of nervous system sounds and induction of relaxation response phenomena. Focusing Yes After Repeated Use Bodily Felt Sense/Verbal Instructions Shift in Awareness Caused by consciously and conscientiously connecting with bodily Felt Sense Alternate Nostril Breathing Yes Immediate Modulation of Breath Immediate state change caused by deep diaphragmatic breathing. Biofeedback Yes Immediate Physiological Body Feedback Increased awareness and ability to modulate aspects of autonomic functions; with practice clients learn to volitionally make beneficial autonomic changes without equipment. Neurofeedback Yes Immediate Brainwave Feedback Increased awareness of brainwave patterns connected to thoughts; with practice clients learn to flexibly modulate brain wave patterns and volitionally modify internal processes without equipment. Holotrophic Breathwork Yes Immediate Modulation of Breath Wide range of breath techniques engenders rebirthing effect; including increased awareness of pre-natal and post-natal birth experiences.
  83. 83. Stress-Anxiety-Physical Pain Scale Rate your current state on a scale from “0” to “10” “0” you feel great, have no pain, have no distress “10” you have unbearable pain and are in distress Category Stress Anxiety Physical Pain Mental Clarity Before After
  84. 84. Benefits of Epigenetic Alterations of Mind-Body Equation Even if we have been set on high-reactive mode for decades or a lifetime, we can still dial it down. We can respond to life’s inevitable stressors more appropriately and shift away from an overactive inflammatory response. We can become neurobiologically resilient. We can turn bad epigenetics into good epigenetics and rescue ourselves. We have the capacity, within ourselves, to create better health. We might call this brave undertaking ‘the neurobiology of awakening’ (Nakazawa, 2015). http://aeon.co/magazine/psychology/how-childhood- biography-shapes-adult-biology/
  85. 85. Benefits of Epigenetic Alterations of Mind-Body Equation Today, scientists recognise a range of promising approaches to help create new neurons (known as neurogenesis), make new synaptic connections between those neurons (known as synaptogenesis), promote new patterns of thoughts and reactions, bring underconnected areas of the brain back online – and reset our stress response so that we decrease the inflammation that makes us ill (Nakazawa, 2015). http://aeon.co/magazine/psychology/how-childhood-biography- shapes-adult-biology/
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  151. 151. Nitric Oxide Spiking and Consciousness A Presentation by Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D, COFT Consciousness Society Conference Yale University New Haven, CT June 5, 2015
  152. 152. Although nitric oxide (NO) has been researched intensively by the scientific community, a little known aspect is that NO spiking underlies shifts in Consciousness. Since ancient times, men and women have sought to achieve what we refer to as altered states of consciousness (ASC) to access, explore, and experience multiple realms of awareness and statebound knowledge including Stillpoints, self and other compassion, as well as states of illumination, transcendence, “Oneness” or “Unity.”
  153. 153. A little studied feature of nitric oxide spiking is that it occurs co-terminously with whole brain synchronous states and whenever a Relaxation Response is generated. Although typically measured quantitatively, NO can also be experienced qualitatively, as bodily feltsense phenomena. The Biosonic Otto 128 Hertz kinesthetic tuning fork has demonstrated its ability to consistently spike nitric oxide, subsequently creating a Relaxation Response and corresponding potentials for Whole Brain Synchrony.
  154. 154. In this presentation, Dr. Wright will share his views on how tuning forks and other qualitative methods work to directly and indirectly spike NO for healthy well being. Learn how you can become more qualitatively aware of ASC shifts in your own Consciousness and flexibly modify your attentional focus via tuning into your bodily feltsense by achieving a consistently beneficial elevated Relaxation Response that also dissolves stress, anxiety and chronic pain.
  155. 155. Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT
  156. 156. www.StressFreeNow.info Robert Wright, Jr., Ph.D., COFT is an author, speaker, and Stress Management Wellness Coach. His passionate goal is translating the significance and implications of scholarly stress and nitric oxide spiking research into language and practical techniques which can improve the healthy well- being of the general public. Dr. Wright's most recent book is entitled 7 Tips for Avoiding Stress burnout for Busy Entrepreneurs and he is the author of the forthcoming book Nitric Oxide Spiking: Your Key to Well Being. You can learn more about how to reduce your stress by listening to his popular podcast series at www.StressFreeNow.info/category/podcasts/

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