KISD Conference / Bringing Service Design In-House

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Companies need to learn how to apply Service design themselves – instead of relying only on external experts. The session at KISD Conference on 2015 followed a pragmatic approach that provides best practises on bringing knowledge and experience in-house. We discussed different learning concepts that address various stakeholders ranging from front stage staff to managers. An essential part of the conversation was to shed light on boundaries and pitfalls as this is an important aspect of learning as well. Furthermore dos and don’ts of ‘learning how to service design’ were discussed.

Manuel Großmann and Martin Jordan presented at KISD Conference on May 18 under the overarching topic of ‘Refining the Meaning of Design’

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KISD Conference / Bringing Service Design In-House

  1. 1. Service Design Berlin K I S D / M AY 1 8 , 2 0 1 5 Bringing Service Design In-House Manuel Großmann & Martin Jordan
  2. 2. Who are we to talk about this topic? Katrin PhD Candidate, University of Potsdam Olga Business Consultant, Fuxblau Mauro Designer, SAP Manuel Service Designer, Fuxblau Martin Designer, Nokia
  3. 3. Two aspects of bringing service design in-house Learning & teaching
  4. 4. CO N T E N T W H Y Reasons to bring service design in-house ! W H E N Occasions ! H O W Formats ! WHAT Content to teach and train ! 3 M AG I C I N G R E D I E N TS ! F U T U R E O F L E A R N I N G ? ! TA K E AWAYS
  5. 5. Why Relevance
  6. 6. W H Y Why do companies seek external help? Need for inspiration Lack of knowledge and skills Need for additional (wo)manpower
  7. 7. When Occasions
  8. 8. W H E N Two ways of bringing service design in-house Goal: Enabling staff to solve service-design related challenges by themselves Goal: Completing tasks by external professionals when internal resources or expertise are limited P R OJ E C T- B A S E D W O R KT R A I N I N G S
  9. 9. B A S I C S Photo by Flickr user: Brian (Ziggy) Liloia You wouldn’t expect to learn woodworking in a day. Why should service design be any different?
  10. 10. B A S I C S In order to master service design (like many other skills) two things are needed: understanding of what it is and how it works practise, practise, practise
  11. 11. How Formats
  12. 12. Bringing Service Design in-house Through project- based support
  13. 13. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T When is a good time for project-based support? Design Council (2005): The Design Process, http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/news-opinion/design-process-what-double-diamond Discover Define Develop Deliver brief concept review feasibility review
  14. 14. The (traditional) agency model is an outdated model P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Call for help / Brief Work by the agency Presentation & handover of documentation
  15. 15. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Weaknesses of the (traditional) agency model Lack of knowledge transfer Lack of internal insights (stakeholder & their needs) Lack of internal buy-in (not invented here) Lack of impact
  16. 16. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T An integrated model F O R M AT • external consultants run the project • client’s team members join crucial parts of the process or entire process (e.g. user research, creation of personas, blueprints…) CO N S • takes extra time on both sides: internal & external P R O S • in-house team members can observe, engage and learn • in-house team members understand the value of certain tools & approaches
  17. 17. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Approaches for project-based support Contractor, hired by marketing team Partner, hired by design, product / service dev team Gets job done as tasked Evolves focus along the way Works independently after receiving brief Work co-located w/ designers & researchers of client Delivers final documentation Delivers actionable tools & knowledge Expertise stays in agency Expertise is exchanged between agency & client T R A D I T I O N A L I N T E G R AT E D
  18. 18. “As a client we are very involved. The agencies aren’t used to that. Some have a problem with it. We don’t work with these any longer.” — A N A P E S S A N H A , Senior Design & User Researcher, Nokia
  19. 19. is controlled by company constantly gets guidance that leads to meaningful outcomes spends extra time through co-location creates co-ownership of client team member has less freedom in working process focusses on topics of importance & relevance needs to cater for special stakeholders gets heard by key stakeholders is tasked to create more artefacts creates tools that are actively used by people afterwards P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Pains and gains for the agency PA I N S G A I N S
  20. 20. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Example deliverables of research project Final documentation / presentation / report P R E V I O U S LY N O W Workshops Videos User journeys Posters Cards with findings
  21. 21. P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T Tips for an integrated model (for clients) Client employees need to partake in parts of the process Results should be summarised as workshops, not presentations Embrace collaboration & co-location
  22. 22. Bringing Service Design in-house Through trainings
  23. 23. T R A I N I N G S Three approaches for trainings I N T E N S I V E W O R K S H O P I N T E G R AT E D W O R K S H O P S W O R K S H O P & CO N S U LT I N G
  24. 24. I N T E N S I V E W O R K S H O P
  25. 25. Intensive Workshops T R A I N I N G S F O R M AT • length of 1–5 days • Mix of theoretical input and workshop modules during which participants apply new tools and methods CO N S • very hard to integrate into regular work schedule • not very sustainable • missing link between training & work environment P R O S • everything can be done within one session • high level of focus
  26. 26. Intensive Workshops T R A I N I N G S T I M E LEVELOFSUPPORT
  27. 27. I N T E G R AT E D W O R K S H O P S
  28. 28. Integrated Workshops T R A I N I N G S F O R M AT • several 2-hour session spread out over 1–2 weeks • Mix of theoretical input and workshop modules during which participants apply new tools and methods • 1 tool/method per session CO N S • potentially more expensive • overall time for training is limited P R O S • very easy to integrate into regular work schedule • easier to train larger groups • more time to digest the input
  29. 29. Integrated Workshops T R A I N I N G S T I M E LEVELOFSUPPORT
  30. 30. “The format of short two-hour session throughout a week allowed us to train a larger team because all were able to spare some time every day. It also showed us that small work packages can be finished within a very short time.” — I N G A B E R G E N , CEO, Welldoo
  31. 31. W O R K S H O P & CO N S U LT I N G
  32. 32. Workshop & Consulting T R A I N I N G S CO N S • potentially more expensive 
 (more time & extra travel costs) • timing is relevant P R O S • very effective in terms of translating the input into the real context F O R M AT • Mix of theoretical input and workshop modules during which participants apply new tools and methods upfront • Consulting sessions afterwards (spread over several weeks) to help participants apply the knowledge within real projects over a period of time
  33. 33. T R A I N I N G S Workshop & Consulting T I M E LEVELOFSUPPORT
  34. 34. “The initial workshop creates a wow moment. It’s creates a new perspective. The following consulting allows a transfer into practise. What is more it keeps up the awareness for the tools and methods.” — A DA M L AW R E N C E , Co-founder, Work Play Experience
  35. 35. What Content
  36. 36. Content for service design trainings •user research •personas •scenarios & user journeys •prototyping & testing T R A I N I N G S •service blueprint •business model canvas •stakeholder map B A S I C : U S E R - C E N T E R E D D E S I G N A D VA N C E D : S E R V I C E S YS T E M S
  37. 37. Choosing a challenge T R A I N I N G S R E L AT E D TO R E A L W O R K A R T I F I C I A L / I N D E P E N D E N T ! P R O S • high relevance • apply in real work context ! ! ! P R O S • focus on tools & methods • willingness to experiment • user research & prototyping can be easier !CONS • hard to abstract • pressure to solve problem • experimentation can be hindered ! CO N S • hard to translate into real work context • relevance is unclear
  38. 38. What & How The 3 magic ingredients
  39. 39. #1 Atmosphere
  40. 40. Setting a mood for learning M AG I C I N G R E D I E N TS C R A Z I N E S S crazy atmosphere supports outside of the box thinking T E A M S P I R I T facilitation and creating an environment for learning is key
  41. 41. “Anyone who tried to make a distinction between education and entertainment doesn’t know the first thing about either.” — M A R S H A L L M C LU H A N , Philosopher of communication theory
  42. 42. #2 Artefacts
  43. 43. Expand the impact through artefacts A R T E FAC T S I N T R A I N I N G S • method cards • templates • booklets I N P R OJ E C T- B A S E D S U P P O R T • printouts of deliverables P R O S • easy to access • always present F O R M AT • physical artefacts P R O S • helps stakeholders to present their work • showcase results in coffee breaks
  44. 44. Expanding the time for support A R T E FAC T S T I M E LEVELOFSUPPORT artefacts left behind
  45. 45. “We pinned print-outs of personas, user journeys and a service blueprint to the hallway wall. This helped a great deal to communicate to others what were working on.” — M A R C P I R S I N G , Head of Commercial Service Center, Bayer Business Services
  46. 46. #3 Timing
  47. 47. The moment of the collaboration is crucial • e.g. if team works with scrum, training should be adapted to sprints ! • collaboration should start at the right time within the bigger context (or project timeline) T I M I N G & I N T E G R AT I O N
  48. 48. The future of learning service design An outlook
  49. 49. Traditional learning model T H E F U T U R E O F S E R V I C E D E S I G N T E AC H I N G L E A R N I N G B A S I C S with the help of a pro A P P LY I N G T H E K N O W L E D G E by yourself
  50. 50. Flipped classroom model T H E F U T U R E O F S E R V I C E D E S I G N T E AC H I N G L E A R N I N G B A S I C S by yourself A P P LY I N G T H E K N O W L E D G E with the help of a pro
  51. 51. B A S I C S “Practise makes perfect” Photo by Flickr user: Brian (Ziggy) Liloia
  52. 52. Takeaways
  53. 53. M A I N TA K E AWAY P R OJ E C T- B A S E D W O R KT R A I N I N G S Two complementary approaches
  54. 54. 5 tips for successful service design learning
  55. 55. When hiring outside experts, remember: 5 T I P S Don’t expect to learn service design within a day Demand a collaborative learning model Ask for a mix of theoretical input & time to apply the knowledge Make sure you have enough time to test the learned method & tools before your collaboration ends Pay special attention to when a training starts
  56. 56. 5 tips for successful service design teaching
  57. 57. When you plan your training, consider: 5 T I P S Your business development team needs to understand the process Always aim for a collaborative model Offer a mix of trainings and consulting which is stretched over a longer period of time for high impact Pay special attention to the atmosphere itself in which learning happens Plan your deliverables as artefacts to leave something behind
  58. 58. Your thoughts, please!
  59. 59. Want to learn more?
  60. 60. Nov 13–14, 2015 Berlin / Germany www.serviceexperiencecamp.de Interactive conference for Service Innovators
  61. 61. Thanks for joining! servicedesignberlin.de @SD_Berlin fb.com/servicedesignberlin Icons by Lil Squid, Edward Boatman, Gonzalo Bravo, Jeremy J Bristol, Attilio Baghino, Lorena Salagre, DesignNex, Nicholas Menghini, Joe Richardson, Guvnor Co, Mourad Mokrane, Hadi Davodpour, iconsmind.com, Luis Prado, Erwin Supriyatna, Jens Tärning

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