Contemporary poetry introductions and getting an a

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Contemporary poetry introductions and getting an a

  1. 1. UNSEEN POETRYA664 – 45 minutes to write about an unseen poem (one question, no choice)
  2. 2. Lesson 1
  3. 3. PRACTICE FOR THE EXAM ANNOTATE AS MANY FEATURES OF S.M.I.L.E. IN THIS POEM AS YOU CAN IN 10 MINUTESAbout His Person (page 105) a rolled up note of explanationFive pounds fifty in change, exactly, planted there like a spray carnationa library card on its date of expiry. but beheaded, in his fist.A postcard stamped, A shopping list.unwritten, but franked, A giveaway photograph stashed in his wallet,a pocket size diary slashed with a pencil a keepsake banked in the heart of a locket.from March twenty-fourth to the first of April. No gold or silver,A brace of keys for a mortise lock, but crowning one fingeran analogue watch, self winding, stopped. a ring of white unweathered skin.A final demand That was everything.in his own hand,  Simon Armitage What did you find?
  4. 4. LEARNING OBJECTIVEOV E R T H E N E X T T W O L E S S O N S W E W I L L THINK ABOUT: How do we evaluate the tone of a poem? (AO1)What does an A look like in the Contemporary Poetry exam? (AO1 and 2)
  5. 5. UNSEEN POETRY PLAN Read the question, highlighting the key words. Read the poem with the question inmind. Annotate the poem looking for features of SMILE that relate to the question youare being asked to answer. Sequence these into clear points, cluster together any points that might be relatedand can therefore be written about in the same PEARL paragraph. If there are bulletpoints to help you structure a response, make sure you haveselected a PEARL for each. If there are no bulletpoints, use the SMILE structure tohelp you organise your response. You have 10 minutes at the most to do this
  6. 6. UNSEEN POETRY RESPOND Write a response which begins with an outline of the poem‟s meaning, toneand how the poet wants the reader to feel about their subject. You shouldinclude the key words from the question. Next come your PEARL paragraphs addressing either the bulletpoints orSMILE. Remember the key words from the question should feature in your pointand in your EAR. Conclude with a personal response (remember to be positive – there are nomarks for „I hated this poem, it was rubbish!‟) and bring everything back to the keywords in the question.
  7. 7. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO1)In your introduction it is a good idea to summarise the poem‟s meaning, tone andthe response you think the poet wanted from the reader.The tone and reader response are created by the poem overall – the events andtheir order, the narrative voice, the rhythm and rhyme, the use of imagery, theword choices, the layout on the page...It is like looking at a picture and being able to sense the tone and mood an artistwanted to create. Or hearing a piece of music and having it put you in a particularmood.
  8. 8. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO1) Listen to the songs. How does each make you feel?This is probably the mood and tone the artist was going for when theycomposed the song. They wanted to make the reader feel a particular wayabout an idea or issue. They also wanted to portray their own feelings.
  9. 9. TEACHER: CHOOSE SOME SONGS WITH CLEAR TONE AND MOODe.g. Ride of the Valkyires, Swan Lake, The Lazy song Bruno Mars, So what Pink... (all available on youtube – but just listen don’t watch)
  10. 10. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO 1)Take a look at the images that follow. For each write down thetone/mood in the image and how you think the artist wantedthe person looking at it to feel. What emotion do they evoke inyou?
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  21. 21. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO1)Poetry is just like the songs or painting, it is a way of communicating an idea andfeeling.Now take a look at these extracts of poetry : What is the tone/mood of each extract? How do you think the poet wanted the person reading it to feel? What emotion do they evoke in you? How does the poet feel about the subject of their poem?
  22. 22. Brash with glass, I‟m not playing ball boy any longer Name flaring like a flag, Batman, now I‟ve doffed that off-the-shoulder It squats Sherwood-forest-green and scarlet number In the grass and weeds,Explain yuself For a pair of jeans and crew-neck jumper; Incipent Port Jackson trees:wha yu mean Now I‟m taller; harder; stronger; older. New, up-market, haute cuisine,when yu say half-caste Guard at the gatepost, Whites only inn. Sometimes, the sudden rushIt grows back, a stump of a shoot Of fortune. The municipal pipe bursts,Grows longer, grows moist, grows strong veins, Silver crashes to the groundIt ties the other tongue in knots, And the flow has foundThe bud opens, the bud opens in my mouth, A roar of tongues.It pushes the other tongue aside.Every time I think I‟ve forgotten, This is the time and place to be alive:I think I‟ve lost the mother tongue,It blossoms out of my mouth. When the daily furniture of our lives Stirs, when the improbable arrives.
  23. 23. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO1) In your introduction it is a good idea to summarise the poem’s meaning, tone and the response you think the poet wanted from the reader.Here is an example introduction to the question: how does the poet show theiropinions strongly?:In Agard’s Poem he expresses his reaction towards the use of the word ‘half-caste’ to describepeople of mixed race. His response is angry, almost confrontational, and direct in addressingthe reader. He demands the reader think about the use of the word and, by the end of thepoem, he makes us feel as strongly about it’s use as he does. Explain yuself wha yu mean Your turn – choose any other extract and write when yu say half-caste the introduction to the same question.
  24. 24. HOW DO WE EVALUATE THE TONE OF A POEM? (AO1)What are we looking for/at?
  25. 25. H O W D O W E E V A L UA T E T H E T O N E O F A P O E M ? ( A O 1 )S O M E T I M E S YO U M I G H T R E A D A P O E M W H E R E T H E T O N E C H A N G E S PA R T WA Y T H R O U G H Morning Groggily groggily And island man wakes up Comes back to sands To the sound of blue surf in his head Of a grey metallic soar What The steady breaking and wombing To surge of wheels different To dull North Circular roar tones and Wild seabirds moods can And fishermen pushing out to sea Muffling muffling you see in The sun surfacing defiantly His crumpled pillow waves this poem? From the east Island man heaves himself Of his small emerald island He always comes back Another London day
  26. 26. Lesson 2
  27. 27. LEARNING OBJECTIVEOV E R T H E T W O L E S S O N S W E H AV E A N D WILL BE THINKING ABOUT: How do we evaluate the tone of a poem? (AO1)What does an A look like in the Contemporary Poetry exam? (AO1 and 2)
  28. 28. STARTER: Look at the poem: From the Motorway and the question .You have 10 minutes to annotate the features of S.M.I.L.E. that you think would help you answer this question.
  29. 29. Teacher: Feedback from starter onto board.
  30. 30. UNSEEN POETRY PLAN Read the question, highlighting the key words. Read the poem with the question inmind. Annotate the poem looking for features of SMILE that relate to the question youare being asked to answer. Sequence these into clear points, cluster together any points that might be relatedand can therefore be written about in the same PEARL paragraph. If there are bulletpoints to help you structure a response, make sure you haveselected a PEARL for each. If there are no bulletpoints, use the SMILE structure tohelp you organise your response. You have 10 minutes at the most to do this
  31. 31. WHAT DOES AN A LOOK LIKE IN THE C O N T E M P O R A RY P O E T RY E X A M ? ( A O 1 A N D 2 )How does the poet make From the Motorway such a powerful attack on motorways?You should consider:• how the poet describes the scenery and destinations on motorways L &• how the poet describes the experience of travelling on motorways I• what the travellers on motorways are missing M• the tone of voice in the poem E• the language the poet uses L• how the poem is structured S• anything else that you think important.
  32. 32. FROM THE MOTORWAY ANNE STEVENSONEverywhere up and down the island till you‟re there, wherever there defending a shamelessly naked 25Britain is mending her desert: is, ready to be someone in (rarely a stitch of work on her)marvellous we exclaim as we fly on it, Liverpool, Leeds, Manchester, 15 captive free lane,tying the country in a parcel. they‟re all the same to the road,London to Edinburgh, Birmingham to Cardiff. 5 which the inchlings inch on which loves itself, which nonethelessNo time to examine the contents, without bite or sup, at most here and there hands you trailing a hard shoulder to creep on, 30thank you, but consider the bliss of necklaces of fumes in which to besitting absolutely numbed to your while there, on all sides, one squeezed breather among 20nulled mind, music when you want it, lie your unwrapped destinations, rich and ragged, sprinter and staggerer,while identical miles thunder under you, 10 lanes trickling off into childhood a status parade for Major Roadworksthe same spot coming and going or anonymity, apple-scented villages toiling in his red-trimmed triangle,seventy, eighty times a minute, asleep in their promise of being 35 then a regiment of wounded orange witches nowhere anyone would like to get to.
  33. 33. WHAT DOES AN A LOOK LIKE IN THEC O N T E M P O R A RY P O E T RY E X A M ? ( A O 1 A N D 2 )So you‟ve gathered your evidence to answer this question. Now, how will youstructure your response? What will your PEARLs be?PEARLs:1.2.3.Number your evidence/annotations to show which PEARL it belongs with.Will you cover all elements of the question/SMILE with this plan?
  34. 34. UNSEEN POETRY RESPOND Write a response which begins with an outline of the poem‟s meaning, toneand how the poet wants the reader to feel about their subject. You shouldinclude the key words from the question. Next come your PEARL paragraphs addressing either the bulletpoints orSMILE. Remember the key words from the question should feature in your pointand in your EAR. Conclude with a personal response (remember to be positive – there are nomarks for „I hated this poem, it was rubbish!‟) and bring everything back to the keywords in the question.
  35. 35. WHAT DOES AN A LOOK LIKE IN THEC O N T E M P O R A RY P O E T RY E X A M ? ( A O 1 A N D 2 ) What follows is a response to this question, which was the June 2011 exam question. Using the mark scheme, what mark and band would you give it?
  36. 36. Contemporary Poetry A664Band Mark AO1 AO2 QWC1 16 •sophisticated critical perception in •sensitive understanding of the •text is legible 15 response to and interpretation of text significance and effects of writers‟ •spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate and cogent and precise evaluation of well- choices of language, structure and assured selected detail from the text form •meaning is very clearly communicated2 14 •critical engagement and insight in •critical insight into the •text is legible 13 response to and interpretation of text(s) significance and effects of writers‟ •spelling, punctuation and grammar are accurate •evaluation of well-selected reference to choices of language, structure and •meaning is very clearly communicated detail of text(s) form3 12 •clear, sustained responses to the text(s) •clear understanding of some of •text is legible 11 •support from careful and relevant the effects of writers‟ choices of •spelling, punctuation and grammar are mainly accurate reference to detail of the text(s) language, structure and form •meaning is clearly communicated4 10 •reasonably developed personal •overall understanding that writers‟ •text is legible 9 response to the text(s) choices of language, structure and •some errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar •use of appropriate support from detail form contribute to meaning/effect •meaning is clearly communicated for most of the answer of the text(s)5 8 •reasonably organised response to •understanding of some features of •text is mostly legible 7 text(s) language, structure and/or form •frequent errors in spelling, punctuation and grammar •use of some relevant support from the •communication of meaning is sometimes hindered text(s)
  37. 37. In the poem „‟From the Motorway‟ the motorway is portrayed as a mind-numbingly dull experiencewhich saps precious moments away from unwitting drivers. The poet describes the motorway as an endless cycle of reoccurring images that never cease to boredrivers as they witness the same road in the same constant stripe: “while identical miles thunder underyou”. The writer uses distressed, repetitive imagery to create the same dull feeling in the reader as thescenery does to the driver. However the beginning may begin lacking excitement as the narratordescribes the motorway, the narrator ends the poem with a irresistibly luring description of the placesthe drivers miss as they drive on past: “apple scented villages”. The narrator is therefore claiming thatthe motorway drains and leeches the fun and excitement of travelling as it boxes you in its path andwon‟t release you until you reach your destination.. The narrator refers to the country as a gift not to be opened as you drive on down the frustratinglynever-ending motorway, “tying the country in a parcel... No time to examine the contents”. Thenarrators tone when describing the parcel is pleasant and excitable however the tone drops to that ofdepression like that of a disappointed child unable to open a present. Again this shows that themotorway prevents any fun being absorbed on the long inescapable trek. However the poet does lateropen the package for the reader towards the end of the poem. The gift is that of freedom “lanestrickling off into childhood” all that which the motorway is stripping away. All these people need is away out, which presents them as prisoners and the motorway as the person with the key unwilling toshare once again portraying the motorway as an evil dictator. The writer uses personification to place blame on the motorway as if it is the motorway‟s doing , like itis the motorway‟s fault “they‟re all the same to the road which loves it‟s self... hands you...”. Thisportrays the motorway as a selfish, self obsessed, attention clutching captor who will spit you out whenyou‟ve served your purpose. It self-centred attitude means it cares not where you go, only how you getthere and that way is the motorway. It drags both you and your car along until you are both battered andshattered and leaves you to fend for yourself once you leave its company.
  38. 38. In the poem „‟From the Motorway‟ the motorway is portrayed as a mind-numbingly dull experiencewhich saps precious moments away from unwitting drivers. Good overview Textual Support  The poet describes the motorway as an endless cycle of reoccurring images that never cease to boredrivers as they witness the same road in the same constant stripe: “while identical miles thunder under you”. The writer uses distressed, repetitive imagery to create the same dull feeling in the reader as the scenery does to the driver. However the beginning may begin lacking excitement as the narrator describes the motorway, the narrator ends the poem with a irresistibly luring description of the placesthe drivers miss as they drive on past: “apple scented villages”. The narrator is therefore claiming that the motorway drains and leeches the fun and excitement of travelling as it boxes you in its path andwon‟t release you until you reach your destination.. Reader involvement  The narrator refers to the country as a gift not to be opened as you drive on down the frustratinglynever-ending motorway, “tying the country in a parcel... No time to examine the contents”.Right Word Thenarrators tone when describing the parcel is pleasant and excitable however the tone drops to that ofdepression like that of a disappointed child unable to open a present. Again this shows that with Metaphor Engaging the motorway prevents any fun being absorbed on the long inescapable trek. However the poet does later open the package for the reader towards the end of the poem. The gift is that of freedom “lanestrickling off into childhood” all that which the motorway is stripping away. All these people need is away out, which presents them as prisoners and the motorway as the person with the key unwilling toshare once again portraying the motorway as an evil dictator.   The writer uses personification to place blame on the motorway as if it is the motorway‟s doing , like itis the motorway‟s fault “they‟re all the same to the road which loves it‟s self... hands you...”. Thisportrays the motorway as a selfish, self obsessed, attention clutching captor who will spit you out whenyou‟ve served your purpose. It self-centred attitude means it cares not where you go, only how you get there and that way is the motorway. It drags both you and your car along until you are both battered andshattered and leaves you to fend for yourself once you leave its company.Critical engagement and insight. Not exhaustive but does discuss the material in the poem and the candidate has structured well.
  39. 39. WHAT DOES AN A LOOK LIKE IN THEC O N T E M P O R A RY P O E T RY E X A M ? ( A O 1 A N D 2 ) This is a forceful response to the unseen poem. The introduction suggests a willingness to engage with both AO1 and AO2. The poet‟s disdain for the motorways is immediately identified and literary devices referred to. There is analysis of and response to the „parcel‟ metaphor and supported discussion of the personification of the motorway and its arrogance. The candidate comments intelligently on the structure in the last paragraph. Although there is not always comment on some aspects on which the response touches (“orange witches”), critical insight is clear. What mark did you give it? This was given a Band 2: 13 marks Do we agree?
  40. 40. WHAT DOES AN A LOOK LIKE IN THE C O N T E M P O R A RY P O E T RY E X A M ? ( A O 1 A N D 2 )Examiner‟s tips:Basic responses will make relevant comments on what Stevenson says, largely throughparaphrasing. They will move on through the bands as understanding becomes more secure andbetter supported by textual reference. Good responses will begin to explore the language of thepoem. There are sound devices reflecting the miles travelled on a motorway that “thunder under”.Metaphors like “necklaces of fumes”, and the activities of the military Major roadworks,protecting the shamelessly naked free lane might be discussed/analysed in high band answers here.Comment on structure might consider the use of enjambment, the constricted third line of versefive mirroring the traffic filtering because of a lane not taken, the way the last five verses hurry to afull stop at the end of verse 6. There is much that can be said about this poem (its title hasambiguities) and it is important to accept thoughtful exploration here. Best answers will discussthe poem, its language and structure with some insight.

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