Bilingual 2

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Bilingual 2

  1. 1. 1 Bilingualism and SLI A slide show to accompany the RALLI film: Bilingualism & SLI
  2. 2. Can a bilingual child have SLI? • SLI is just as likely in a bilingual child as in a monolingual child. • Bilingualism does not cause SLI • Paradis, J., Genesee, F., & Crago, M. (2011). Dual language development and disorders: A handbook on bilingualism and second language learning (2nd Edition). Baltimore, MD: Brookes. • Paradis, J. (2007). Bilingual children with specific language impairment: Theoretical and applied issues. Applied Psycholinguistics, 28, 512-564.
  3. 3. How can we spot SLI in a bilingual child? • Signs of SLI are the same as in a monolingual child e.g. difficulties with • Learning new words • Understanding sentence • Explaining things • Difficulties will be present in all languages including the first/ home language • It is therefore important to get an accurate picture of language development in the first/home language • Paradis, J. (2010). The interface between bilingual development and specific language impairment. Keynote article for special issue with peer commentaries. Applied Psycholinguistics, 31, 3-28
  4. 4. Should we worry if a child mixes up languages? • Mixing languages is normal process in learning 2 languages • “Code switching” • Using words and word order from one language with words/ parts of words from another language • Saying one sentence in one language and following sentence in the other • Children & adults can use more code switching as they become more competent at 2 languages and more aware of what the listener will understand. Opportunities to code switch effectively increase and more complex code switching is possible. • Paradis, J., Genesee, F., & Crago, M. (2011). Dual language development and disorders: A handbook on bilingualism and second language learning (2nd Edition). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.
  5. 5. What if a child doesn’t mix languages? • Some parents follow strict rules about not code switching themselves, though there is no evidence to support the need for this. (see RALLI Myths of Bilingualism film) • Lack of code switching can sometimes be a concern. Children with SLI sometimes have difficulties linking the meanings and labels for words in one language, with the labels in the other language. • Paradis, J., Genesee, F., & Crago, M. (2011). Dual language development and disorders: A handbook on bilingualism and second language learning (2nd Edition). Baltimore, MD: Brookes.
  6. 6. Assessment for SLI • Mixing of languages can be misinterpreted as errors in the use of one language • When assessing a child for SLI, it is therefore important to be able to identify code switching between languages. • Also important to be aware that code switching is part of typical bilingual language development • This means the assessor can distinguish between code switching and actual language errors that may indicate SLI Saenz, T.I. and Huer, M.B. (2003) Testing strategies involving least biased language assessment of bilingual children. Communication Disorders Quarterly. 24 (4) 184-193
  7. 7. What if the child has difficulties understanding at school? • Takes about 2 years to become fluent in conversation • Takes much longer to acquire complex vocabulary needed for school curriculum • Without SLI • Bilingual child’s level of total vocabulary in 2 languages = approx level of vocabulary for a monolingual child • Therefore being ‘behind’ on vocabulary in one language is not necessarily an indicator of SLI Pearson, B.Z., Fernández, S.C. & Oller, D.K. (1993). Lexical development in bilingual infants and toddlers: Comparison to monolingual norms. Language Learning, 43, 93-120 However see: Thordardottir, E. (2011). The relationship between bilingual exposure and vocabulary development. International Journal of Bilingualism, 15(4), 426-445.
  8. 8. What if the child is silent at school? • Silent period can be part of typical development in a new language environment • Silent period can be about 6 months-but very dependent upon individual situation and child • Concerns if: • Silent period goes on for a long time • Child is not speaking in first language, there is a general reluctance to speak • Child is not joining in activities or indicating their needs Roseberry-McKibbin C. and Brice, A. (2005). Acquiring English as a second language: what's "normal", what's not. Retrieved from http://www.asha.org/public/speech/development/easl.htm
  9. 9. 10 RALLI www.YouTube.com/rallicampaign N.B. RALLI logos only to be used on RALLI materials as authorised by RALLI members above
  10. 10. 10 RALLI www.YouTube.com/rallicampaign N.B. RALLI logos only to be used on RALLI materials as authorised by RALLI members above

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