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Connecting Our Cities Lessons for Building Protected Bike Lane Networks

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Abstract: Leaders from some of the country's most sophisticated local transportation advocacy organizations will share the secrets of their campaigns to build networks of protected bike lanes, from a multi-year initiative to transform San Francisco's flatter streets to a battle to build hundreds miles of protected bike lanes in Chicago to tackling the most difficult projects in an already Platinum-level city.
Presenters:
Presenter: Mary Lauran Hall Alliance for Biking & Walking
Co-Presenter: Ron Burke Active Transportation Alliance
Co-Presenter: Chema Hernández Gil San Francisco Bicycle Coalition
Co-Presenter: Rob Sadowsky Bicycle Transportation Alliance

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Connecting Our Cities Lessons for Building Protected Bike Lane Networks

  1. 1. Connecting Our Cities Lessons for Building Protected Bike Lane Networks
  2. 2. Mary Lauran Hall Alliance for Biking & Walking Chema Hernández Gil San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Rob Sadowsky Bicycle Transportation Alliance (OR) Ron Burke Active Transportation Alliance
  3. 3. Mary Lauran Hall Alliance for Biking & Walking Chema Hernández Gil San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Rob Sadowsky Bicycle Transportation Alliance (OR) Ron Burke Active Transportation Alliance
  4. 4. Connecting the City: 100 Miles of Crosstown Bikeways for Everyone Connecting Our Cities: Lessons for Building Protected Bike Lane Networks Pro Walk Pro Bike Pro Place September 2014 Pittsburgh, PA
  5. 5. The Goal: Three “8-80” Routes
  6. 6. The Need: More and More People are Biking
  7. 7. Market Street: The Heart of SF
  8. 8. Polk Street: Ebb and Flow From protected contraflow lane… to bike lane… to sharrows
  9. 9. The Bike Funding Challenge To meet current need and future demand, San Francisco needs to invest $10 billion in transportation infrastructure through 2030. With $3.7 billion already identified, that leaves a $6.3 billion gap.
  10. 10. Building Power and Allies Connecting the City requires allies.
  11. 11. Vision Zero Complementing CTC Building alliances with pedestrian and community advocates for safer streets and more transportation funding.
  12. 12. Mary Lauran Hall Alliance for Biking & Walking Chema Hernández Gil San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Rob Sadowsky Bicycle Transportation Alliance (OR) Ron Burke Active Transportation Alliance
  13. 13. The Portland Experience
  14. 14. Portlandia -­‐-­‐ #4? Hah!
  15. 15. It always takes work
  16. 16. Numbers up but slowing down
  17. 17. Gentrifica?on & Community Needs
  18. 18. Campaigns That Engage
  19. 19. Mary Lauran Hall Alliance for Biking & Walking Chema Hernández Gil San Francisco Bicycle Coalition Rob Sadowsky Bicycle Transportation Alliance (OR) Ron Burke Active Transportation Alliance
  20. 20. Advancing Protected Bike Lanes in Chicago Ron Burke, Active Transportation Alliance
  21. 21. “When Richard M. Daley took office in 1989, bicycling was not very visible in Chicago. There were a few riders, very few. There were no bike lanes, no racks on the sidewalks and no city promotion of cycling. He has taken us from a city where bikes were fringe to a place where cycling is a planned-for and cared-for part of Chicago. For that we’re grateful. We still need to get to where bikes are mainstream, but we’re well on our way because of Mayor Daley’s leadership.” - Randy Neufeld, commenting shortly before Mayor Daley left office in 2011.
  22. 22. 27 Chicago Sun Times Protected bike lanes help business As business owners on Milwaukee Avenue, we fully support the cit1y ’s proposal to install protected bike lanes, reconfigure parking and make safety improvements on our street from Kinzie to Elston. We appreciate the city’s thorough outreach on this project. Unfortunately, the perspective of the many residents and businesses that support the project wasn’t included in the Sun-Times May 1 article, “Tension rises at city bike plan hearing.” These street improvements for the city’s most popular street for cycling will make our neighborhood safer for everyone and help our businesses grow by creating a more livable street. By framing the issue in terms of cyclists vs. anti-cyclists, your coverage overlooks the fact that most city dwellers (and business owners) don’t fit into exclusive categories when it comes to how we get around. We all benefit from safer streets with more orderly traffic. A close look at the public plans shows that there’s a lot more than just bike lanes and parking spaces going on — overall it will make our street a more comfortable place to hang out, helping us to attract more customers and greater investment into our neighborhood. What we’re up against here is a chaotic and unsafe roadway that stifles economic activity. This is the story you should be telling. Tim Coonan, Big Shoulders Cafe; Chris Dunstatter, 694 Wine and Spirits; Angelo Karras, Windy City Cafe
  23. 23. "But the direction Chicago -- and so many other cities -- is taking to enhance bike lanes and provide healthy, convenient and safe transportation options for all is an exciting one that we all need to embrace.” Beth Mosher, director of public affairs for AAA Chicago.
  24. 24. Milwaukee Ave: Before and After New Bike Lane and Complete Sts Design
  25. 25. Bicycling Magazine Chicago Named Second Best U.S. City for Cycling
  26. 26. Mary Lauran Hall MLHall@BikeWalkAlliance.org Chema Hernández Gil Chema@SFBike.org Rob Sadowsky Rob@BTAOregon.org Ron Burke Ron@ActiveTrans.org

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