Placemaking Conference: Pedaling Toward Healthy Communities

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  • Advocates as Equal Partners Advocates, NGOs, Private Sector as Key Players Advocate/promote/partner at all levels: businesses, chamber, non-profits, foundations, clubs, regional orgs Facilitate Change; Get More People on Bikes
  • The NACTO guide is the first national design guide to supplement these existing standards and provide more complete guidance on international best practices and designs. Two of the treatments in the guide are considered experimental. FHWA has stated that they are willing and eager to accept experiments for these specific bikeway treatments.
  • NACTO, for those who are unfamiliar with us, is an organization composed of 15 of the largest cities in the United States . In addition to Cities for Cycling, NACTO has held workshops and sponsored projects on Bus Rapid Transit, Light Rail, Freight, Parking, and other issues that effect large city DOTs. While most of what I am presenting today was developed with large cities in mind, I think you’ll find it equally applicable in many smaller and regional cities across the West. In fact, many of our roadways have even higher volumes than streets in New York and Chicago, we just don’t have as many of them. NACTO’s official mission is to foster the exchange of transportation ideas, insights, and practices among large central cities, and a cooperative approach between these cities on key national transportation issues. We envision the transportation departments of major cities as effective and necessary partners in regional and national transportation efforts, and advocate for cities in these efforts.
  • The NACTO guide is the first national design guide to supplement these existing standards and provide more complete guidance on international best practices and designs. Two of the treatments in the guide are considered experimental. FHWA has stated that they are willing and eager to accept experiments for these specific bikeway treatments.
  • Cycling has yet to be as well-recognized a mainstream transportation option for everyday use. Especially for more hesitant groups such as children, women, and the elderly. Whereas existing guidelines are inherently biased towards confident cyclists, the NACTO guide seeks to accommodate the large percentage of people who are interested in cycling more, but do not consider the road safe or feel comfortable riding with speeding cars.
  • In the United States, cycling is already accepted as a family-friendly, recreational activity. A significant percentage of Americans own bikes already and enjoy bicycling for fun.
  • In the United States, cycling is already accepted as a family-friendly, recreational activity. A significant percentage of Americans own bikes already and enjoy bicycling for fun.
  • In the United States, cycling is already accepted as a family-friendly, recreational activity. A significant percentage of Americans own bikes already and enjoy bicycling for fun.
  • Two Way Cycle Track Two-way cycle tracks are physically separated cycle tracks that allow bicycle movement in both directions on one side of the road. Two-way cycle tracks share some of the same design characteristics as one-way tracks, but may require additional considerations at driveway and side-street crossings. Can be at street, intermediate or raised level.
  • While containing many similar items to our existing signing and marking system, this section is specific to bicycle boulevards. Pavement markings from the large 6foot wide markings in use in many cities down to using the existing shared lane marking are discussed here. Branding signing along the route, signing to notify approaching vehicles on the cross-street, and wayfinding specific elements found on many bicycle boulevard systems. Branding is very important as these networks are less visible to the public than those on major streets.
  • While New York, Portland, Minneapolis, and others have been early leaders in making their streets more bicycle and people-friendly, the cities of Dallas and Chicago are jump starting ambitious campaigns to rival or equal New York and Portland in the years to come. Only a month after Rham Emanuel and his Transportation Commissioner Gabe Klein took office, the city opened its first cycle track on Kinzie Street. The city of Dallas, meanwhile, will be embarking on an ambitious ten-year plan including trails, cycle tracks, and bike lanes connecting bicyclists throughout the expansive city.
  • 05/07/13 Clarus Consulting Group-- (205) 254-0129
  • And a corresponding drop in injuries and in fatalities. This demonstrates that as more cyclists ride, streets become safer for both cyclists, and by extension, pedestrians.
  • In the US, New York City has emerged as the model for reinventing city streets under the most challenging conditions. The city has not only created an immense network of separated, buffered, and conventional bikeways- adding 255 lane miles in 4 years- but has done so under unprecedented constraints and the highest levels of traffic and street life. The city’s Bicycle Share program, due for release in 2012, will set a new tone for bike share systems in the United States, with over 10,000 total bikes in circulation at its initial release. If New York can do it, anyone can.
  • And a corresponding drop in injuries and in fatalities. This demonstrates that as more cyclists ride, streets become safer for both cyclists, and by extension, pedestrians.
  • The Racing to a Liveable Charlotte vision is the culmination of over a decade of partnership and planning work by the Carolina Thread Trail partners in Mecklenburg and Cabarrus Counties.
  • … new and improved bridges, signage and markings, and multiuse trails.
  • As they say, if you build it they will come, and that’s exactly what we saw. The orange bars are the expansion of the bikeway network, and the white line represents the number of bicyclists entering downtown on our major bike-friendly bridges. In 1992, we had 83 miles of bikeways and 2800 daily bridge trips. By 2007, the number of bikeways had tripled (to 271 miles) and the number of riders had quintupled (to 14,500 daily bridge trips).
  • Things have changed even since the 2006 study was completed. Portland was recently designated a Platinum level bicycle friendly community by the League of American Bicyclists - one of only two in the country. The bicycle industry sector has experienced tremendous growth. The number of bike shops has increased to at least 50, and one estimate of the value of the bicycle sector is $100 million value. Downtown boutique hotels have started advertising bicycle-themed packages, and the number of local framebuilders has increased from 5 to 18. New bike-related businesses opening weekly, including a bike-powered gardener, Courier Coffee (which delivers freshly-roasted coffee beans by bicycle), Café Velo (a coffee stand that collapses into a cargo bike for transport), and a downtown pedicab service. There are also businesses that don’t directly provide bicycle-related services or goods, but who reach out to bicyclists and have loyal customer bases among the cycling community. Examples: Amnesia Brewing, which has more bike parking spots than car spots Hopworks Urban Brewing, or HUB, where you can buy a patch kit at the bar and fix your bike in the repair stand outside The Lucky Lab Brewpub that boasts indoor bike parking right in the pub Black Sheep Bakery, which has a bike-thru window (and no auto access) Staccato Gelato, which has a bicycle “ice cream truck” called the Freezee Rider Yoga teachers who specialize in classes for cyclists … and much more. Every serious candidate for City Council is seeking the “bike vote”, and one is even defending the fact that she isn’t a cyclist. You’re looking at the picture of what I hope is our next mayor. A major new economic study came out showing that Portlanders have $2.6 billion more to put back into the local economy thanks to our travel savings, related to strong bicycle, walking and transit use. Portland is also attracting young, college-educated workers 5X faster than national average, in large part because of our bike-friendly reputation. There’s also tremendous local awareness of and pride in bicycle industry and culture, even among people who don’t ride bicycles, and Portland is poised to become THE national center for bicycle-related businesses.
  • Advocates as Equal Partners Advocates, NGOs, Private Sector as Key Players Advocate/promote/partner at all levels: businesses, chamber, non-profits, foundations, clubs, regional orgs Facilitate Change; Get More People on Bikes
  • Placemaking Conference: Pedaling Toward Healthy Communities

    1. 1. PEDALING TOWARD HEALTHYPEDALING TOWARD HEALTHYCOMMUNITIESCOMMUNITIESTHE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 2013 IQC PLACEMAKINGTHE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA 2013 IQC PLACEMAKINGCONFERENCECONFERENCE
    2. 2. Alta Planning + DesignCreating active communities where bicycling andwalking are safe, healthy, fun and normal dailyactivities
    3. 3. • HEALTH: Public/Individual, Environmental, Civic/Social,Economic• New Paradigm for Building Bicycle Infrastructure and Culture:Public Sector can’t get it all done. . .Cities, Businesses, NGOstaking the lead• Establish a Vision• Build Partnerships• Get it built• Catalyze Bike Culture• Calculate benefitsPedaling Towards Healthy Communities
    4. 4. National Home Builders Assocand National Assoc of RealtorsTrails consistentlyrank in the top fiveamenities in makingreal estate purchasedecisions. (NAHB)
    5. 5. “Biking is . . .part of ourstrategy to attract and retainbusinesses. . .We want youngtalent to come here andstay..” – Mayor R.T. RybackAttract Residents, Workers, Investment
    6. 6. The NACTO GuideExpanding the Toolkit
    7. 7. AtlantaAustinBaltimoreBostonChicagoDetroitHoustonLos AngelesMinneapolisNew YorkPhiladelphiaPhoenixPortlandSan FranciscoSeattleWashington D.C.Affiliate Members:Arlington VA. Austin.Cambridge. Hoboken.Indianapolis. MemphisVentura CANational Association of City Transportation Officials(NACTO)
    8. 8. Post 2011 Bikeway Design Guidance
    9. 9. NACTO: Accommodate “interested but concerned”Based on surveys conducted in Portland, ORStrong and fearless Enthused and confident“No way, no how”Interested but concerned
    10. 10. TWO-WAY CYCLE TRACK
    11. 11. “Sooner Cycle Track” Concept: OU Bike Master Plan 2012
    12. 12. Asp Avenue Buffered Bike Lane Concept
    13. 13. Bicycle Boulevards
    14. 14. ESTABLISH A VISION
    15. 15. Atlanta120mile bikewaynetwork by2016Dallas1300mile bikewaynetwork by2021
    16. 16. Atlanta Goal: 60 miles of “Green Lanes”
    17. 17. Image courtesy Looney Ricks Kiss• 15 counties; NC & SC• 2.3 million people• $17M endowment
    18. 18. –US Dept. of Health funding–Land Trust, 30+municipalities,–250 miles of proposedgreenways/trails and 500miles of complete streetsBirmingham Trail System
    19. 19. • $11M grant award forimplementation• Power company, RR, localfoundation partnersBirmingham Trail System
    20. 20. Memphis, TN: Broad Avenue
    21. 21. Memphis, TN: Overton-Broad Connector
    22. 22. Razorback Greenway Vision Workshop: 2010• 40 miles• 6 communities• University of Arkansas• 1 MPO• Major corporate andphilanthropic partnersand sponsors• Basis for $15M TIGERgrant award withequal local match
    23. 23. 10. NW ARKANSAS: A New Way ofThinkingRazorback Greenway Groundbreaking: 2012
    24. 24. GET IT BUILT
    25. 25. Charlotte2012:- 1stgreenbikeway- 1stbike box- Bike share(20 stations)- 1stBufferedBike Lane- 2 cycle trackprojects instudy phase
    26. 26. Harahan Bridge, Memphis
    27. 27. BUILD BIKE CULTURE
    28. 28. Evaluation. . .(more biking!)
    29. 29. • More people on bikes• More women on bikes• Better biking business• Increases transit range• Safer biking cities• 5-40% bike share tripsreplace car tripsBike Share isTransformative!
    30. 30. Bike Sharing in North America
    31. 31. Capital Bikeshare MembershipsWASHINGTON DC / ARLINGTONCapital Bikeshare (CABI)Launched: September, 20101,100+ Bicycles, 114 Stations> 2,000,000 Trips!80,000 Casual users19,000 Annual members
    32. 32. CALCULATE BENEFITS
    33. 33. New York, NY4 years255bike lanemiles added45%growth incommutercycling72%decrease inaverage riskof injury
    34. 34. Evaluating. . .(more biking!)
    35. 35. Charlotte TrailBenefits AnalysisConnected separateagencies’ projectstogether into one regionaltrail vision• $28M trail• 162 millionbike/walk trips• $45 M inhouseholdtransportationsavings• $14 M in healthcare savings• 300 jobs
    36. 36. Year:0 050100150200250300350Bridge Bicycle TrafficBikeway MilesBridge Bicycle TrafficBikeway MilesIncreasing Bicycle UseBikewayMiles1992:83 miles of bikeways2,850 daily trips2007:271 miles of bikeways14,563 daily trips1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 20072,5005,0007,50010,00012,50015,0002,850 3,555 3,885 3,830 3,207 4,520 5,225 5,690 5,910 6,015 7,686 8,250 8,562 8,875 10,192 12,046 14,56378 84 86 103 113 144 166 183 213 222 235 252 254 260 262 263 266CyclistsPer Day
    37. 37. • Growth in bike sector:– $100 M/year (+ 100%since ‘05)– 50+ bike shops (+ 50%since ‘05)– New bike-relatedbusinesses weekly• Further economicstudies:– $2.6 Billion in travelsavings– Attracting educatedworkers 5x fasterEconomic Impacts?
    38. 38. NC EconomicImpact Analysis
    39. 39. Economic Impact: Downtown• “The downtown area of Dunedin,Florida was suffering a 35percent storefront vacancy ratein the early 1990s until thePinellas Trail came into town.Now, storefront occupancy is 100percent and business isbooming.”(source: National Bicycle & PedestrianClearinghouse, 1995)
    40. 40. • HEALTH: Public/Individual, Environmental, Civic/Social,Economic• New Paradigm for Building Bicycle Infrastructure and Culture:Public Sector can’t get it all done. . .Cities, Businesses, NGOstaking the lead• Establish a Vision• Build Partnerships• Get it built• Catalyze Bike Culture• Calculate benefitsPedaling Towards Healthy Communities
    41. 41. THANK YOUJohn Cockjohncock@altaplanning.comDavidson, NCwww.altaplanning.comOur Mission: . . .design better places to bike, walk, play, andlive.
    42. 42. Bike Share Benefits – Study*Source: Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Cost-Benefit Analysis as part of the TIGER applicationfor 3,500 bicycles, as published on the Bike Sharing BlogBike Share Benefit Estimated Cost Savings per Year*Personal cost savings $8.8 millionTime saved commuting $17.1 millionIncreased access to other modes oftransportation$1.7 millionCongestion reduction $381,000Emissions reduction $918,000Public health $90,000Reduced auto accidents $141,000Total Benefits $29 million per year
    43. 43. More Disposable Income• Reducing vehicle milestraveled (VMT) per personby one mile per day in eachof the 51 largest metroareas would produce anaggregate annualhousehold savings of $29billion annually.
    44. 44. Percent of Commuters Who DrivePrice and Godwin, Planetizen 2012
    45. 45. Return on Investment• Vancouver, BCinvested $3 milliondollars on 3.5 milesof trails• A return of $300million in trail-frontinvestments

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