Measuring the Effectiveness of PR Efforts:Are You Busy or Indispensable?

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Aligning measurement with business objectives
Basics of measurement
PR measurement of new and traditional media
Social Media ROI
Cost effective tools & applications
Post evaluation: Leveraging results

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Measuring the Effectiveness of PR Efforts:Are You Busy or Indispensable?

  1. 1. Measuring the Effectiveness of PR Efforts: Are You Busy or Indispensable?  Aligning measurement with business objectives  Basics of measurement  PR measurement of new and traditional media  Social Media ROI  Cost effective tools & applications Lars Voedisch Regional Head – Media Intelligence, APAC  Post evaluation: Dow Jones and Company lars.voedisch@dowjones.com Leveraging results @larsv © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company
  2. 2. About Dow Jones: Meet the Family © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company 2
  3. 3. Relevant Information → Actionable Intelligence 27,000+ global sources 17M+ companies Other People’s 35M+ executives Content 16M+ Websites and blogs Web/Social Mainstream Media Media 150+ researchers Dow Jones 130,000+ indexes Research Media/VC/Risk Dow Jones News, Over 150 Commentary years of & Analysis 2,000 journalists 84 bureaus Indispensable 18,000+ daily news items Content © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company 3
  4. 4. Content + Technology = Relevant Information Dow Jones Content 150 researchers 2000 journalists 11 languages Personalization Wealth Management 18K news items a day Content Content Visualization Investment Management normalization normalization Search Researchers & Premium Content Knowledge Workers 27,000 global sources Discovery 22 languages Investment Banking Over 200K news items a day Metadata Metadata Alerting & Triggers Sales & Trading Symbology Symbology People Web and Social Media Content Visualization Taxonomy Taxonomy Connections PR & Corp Comm 13K websites Risk & Compliance 60K message boards Integration 16 M blogs Private Markets 300K articles a day Widgets Best of breed Sales technologies Newsletters Company and Executive Info 17 M Company Profiles 35 M Executive Profiles Extracted from 75 Million Websites TECHNICAL DIVERSE DATA SOURCES TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM CUSTOMERS CAP ABILITIIES © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company 5|4
  5. 5. What we will do today?  Understand that it’s not enough to LOOK busy  NOT talking about ROI!  Focus on KPIs  Look at CONTEXT  Hear about REAL problems and REAL solutions © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  6. 6. Why measure media coverage? Quick discussion Quick discussion in small groups: in small groups: Why do you Why do you want to measure ? want to measure ? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  7. 7. Why measure media coverage? Reason 1: Demonstrate value of PR (e.g. Outputs) - What key initiatives did you drive? Results? Reason 2: Plan & evaluate communications activities across channels and markets (e.g. Outtakes) - How do you connect to publications & journalists, campaigns; what’s your brand perception? Reason 3: Strategic Communications (e.g. Outcomes) - How do your results relate to the budget allocation? Do you measure KPIs linking PR to business results? What is the value PR adds your organization? Reason 4: Discovering opportunities and threats (Radar) - What’s happening in the industry, with my clients; is there a crisis, are there issues…? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  8. 8. 1) Aligning measurement with business objectives  Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives & setting smart goals Too many communicators Too many communicators work very hard on tactics… work very hard on tactics… …that DON’T support corporate goals! …that DON’T support corporate goals! © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  9. 9. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  10. 10. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Make business GOALS your communications goals, then develop STRATEGIES: Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  11. 11. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Conduct a gap analysis to understand your benchmarks and to decide what are your priorities  Choose metrics to measure the results Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  12. 12. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  You can’t manage what you don’t measure  What impact do your programs have – what are the results? Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  13. 13. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Example: Bicycle Manufacturer  The challenge is to measure your success in a meaningful way! Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  14. 14. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Example: Bicycle Manufacturer Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  15. 15. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Example: Bicycle Manufacturer Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  16. 16. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Example: Bicycle Manufacturer Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  17. 17. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals  Example: Bicycle Manufacturer Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  18. 18. Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals The challenge is to measure your success in a meaningful way! Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  19. 19. Business Objectives Communications Objectives & Strategy Planning, Execution, Controlling Monitor Analyse Discover Engage research & issues, trends opportunities & & pinpoint promote & strategies for risks in time better the the buzz impact to act influential Originally, measurement is post-mortem analysis. For fast environments, it becomes near-time! © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  20. 20. Simple start: Smart Goal Setting for your (Social) Media Strategy  Goals drive the type of measurements you are going to use  What’s your ultimate objective: 1. Awareness 2. Image / Reputation 3. Sales 4. Cost savings 5. Something else? Source: 25 Must Read Social Media Marketing Tips © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 20
  21. 21. 1) Aligning measurement with business objectives  Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives & setting smart goals Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  22. 22. 2) Basics of measurement: Key approaches that give you the right kick-start  Input vs Output vs Outcomes  PR is always comparative: What’s your benchmark?  Field studies, media content analysis, etc © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  23. 23. How to measure media coverage? Quick discussion Quick discussion in small groups: in small groups: What do you What do you currently currently measure ? measure ? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  24. 24. What can we look at? What’s your share of voice? What are the What’s the context? main topics? Where is the conversation? Who’s talking? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  25. 25. Understanding PR Measurement 1. Measurement is research, research is measurement. 2. PR should link communications and business objectives. 3. Measurement must move beyond simple outputs. 4. There is no singular industry standard. 5. Approaches to measurement are evolutionary. “We aren’t in the business of securing media coverage. We’re in the business of projecting and protecting the reputations of organizations.” Alan Chumley, Director of Measurement for Hill & Knowlton, Toronto © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  26. 26. Determine what success looks like  Benchmark - What’s your image now in your core markets  Conduct a rigorous self-assessment - Spend time up front to know what you’re getting into.  Ask: “Why do we want to measure?” - Whose perception do you want to impact? - Don’t start too wide -- it can distract from core goals - Identify the KPIs which will show success © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  27. 27. Turn Output into Positive Outcomes  What do you want to do with the data you gather? - Justify spend and headcount - Help prove your value to your organization  Don’t be afraid of what you might find: - Finding out that you are not who you thought you were should be seen as a success, not a failure of the initiative.  Promote your successes internally  Reassess. Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  28. 28. Turn Output into Positive Outcomes  Outputs - what is generated as a result of a PR program or campaign  Outtakes - what audiences have understood and/or heeded and/or responded to  Outputs - quantifiable changes in awareness, knowledge, attitude, opinion and behavior levels Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  29. 29. Too dry, too theoretical, too complicated? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  30. 30. Example – FIFA Worldcup GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Become Play in the final Score goals Win matches 2010 World the best round in South Champion country Africa 7 matches 16 goals scored Won 5 games 3rd Place played 7 matches 8 goals scored Won 6 games WORLD played CHAMPION How to translate this to PR? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  31. 31. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Place # meetings % awareness of # of requests Leads product # of speaking your brand for information reviews engagements % considering Initiate # of blog your brand speakers mentions % preferring program your brand # of reviews Proactive # of media blogger contacts made outreach # of news releases sent Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  32. 32. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Place BYO: % awareness of # of requests # meetings Leads Build your own KPI considering for information product reviews # of speaking engagements your brand % framework, suiting# your requirements, Initiate of blog your brand speakers capabilities and % preferring program mentions # of reviews resources your brand Proactive # of media blogger contacts made outreach # of news releases sent Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  33. 33. Example DHL: Built our own KPI framework, suiting our requirements, capabilities and resources © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  34. 34. Case Study : Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales  Business Goal: - Sell more Palm Centro phones  Communications Objectives: - Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencers - Attract fashion phone upgraders - Encourage Palm handheld users to change to a smartphone  Measurement Metrics: - Outputs: - Number of articles - Audience reach - Outtakes: - How favourable is the device viewed by the media - Is the coverage on message - Outcomes: Number of phones sold  Result: - Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral); nearly all on message © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  35. 35. Case Study : Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales  Business Goal: - Sell more Palm Centro phones  Communications Objectives: - Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencers - Attract fashion phone upgraders - Encourage Palm handheld users to change to a smartphone  Measurement Metrics: - Outputs: - Number of articles - Audience reach - Outtakes: - How favourable is the device viewed by the media - Is the coverage on message - Outcomes: Number of phones sold  Result: - Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral); nearly all on message © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  36. 36. Case Study : Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales Key Message A Key Message B Key Message C  Business Goal: for a It’s time Easy-to-use – Increasing - Sell more Palm Centro phones just smart not personal  Communications Objectives: ‘another’ decision productivity - Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencerson the go computer - Attract fashionCentro is upgraders intuitive Choosing the phone Through it’s Messaging, email, built- - Encourage Ana lysis Palm handheld users to change to a in capabilities to Tone ultimate smart the Ana lysis Tone user interface and smartphone decision for fashion the combination of view & edit  Measurement Metrics: On-Messa ge Anaand phone upgraders documents lysis touch screen and On-Messa ge Ana lysis - Outputs: want both style who keyboard, the access to over 3 & smart phone - Number of articles Centro is the ideal 3 20,000 applications, functionalities partner for young, makes the Centro - Audience reach No. of energetic and THE customizable No. of - Outtakes: Positives sociable users who mobile companion Positives No. of is the want a smart phone No. of - How favourable Neutralsdevice viewed by the media Neutrals to organize their for dynamic junior- Message No. On Message No. On to mid-level No. Not On Message No. Not On Message No. of - Is the coverage on message and No. of lives professionals to Negatives Negatives - Outcomes: Number of phones sold relationships on help them the go managing their  Result: busy work and 23 - Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral);social live onnearly all 23 message © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  37. 37. Case Study : Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales  Business Goal: - Sell more airplane tickets  Communications Objective: - Drive traffic to web site from press releases and media stories  Measurement Metrics: - Outputs: Number of articles - Outtakes: Awareness of Southwest service to the region; % increase in unique visitors to web site from PR site - Outcomes: Number of tickets sold  Result: - Over $40 million in ticket sales from press releases. Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  38. 38. Case Study: Media Perceptions UK General Elections 2010 © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  39. 39. UK Elections - Background  Since WW II, the UK did not have a coalition government  It is the first time TV debates for the candidates were introduced  Gordon Brown did not go through public elections before  UK strongly affected by global financial crisis © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  40. 40. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 06 Apr – Brown calls elections © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  41. 41. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 16 Apr – Clegg ‘wins’ first TV debate (Domestic policy) © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  42. 42. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 22 Apr – Second TV debate helps Cameron and Clegg (International affairs) © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  43. 43. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 28 Apr - Brown calls 65-year-old widow ‘bigoted woman’, apologizes © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  44. 44. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 29 Apr – Cameron does well during third TV debate (Economy & Taxes) © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  45. 45. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze 6 May – Polling Day © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  46. 46. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze Social vs Traditional Media: • Higher amplitudes • Looking for ‘news’ • Generally in-sync 11/12 May – Government forms, Cameron becomes PM © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  47. 47. Early stages: Brown dominates until first TV debate Brown dominates the media •06 Apr – Brown calls elections •16 Apr – Clegg ‘wins’ first TV debate © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  48. 48. Phenomenon Clegg: Liberal leader’s star starts rising even before the first TV debate -Nick Clegg’s rise started before the 1st debate – not only down to TV appearance. -Comparing days immediately before and after the debate, Cameron lost ground, Clegg gained ground Brown remained stable (based on volume). © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  49. 49. Candidate Presence – Cameron 2010 Clegg received more media attention than eventual Prime minister Cameron until shortly before the confirmation of a conservative led government. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  50. 50. Domestic Issues – Immigration / Crime • Immigration – Brown – (31.03.) – “Controlling Immigration for a Fairer Britain” keynote speech • Immigration – Clegg – (16.04.) – “good/bad immigration”, “other parties talk tough on immigration, but deliver chaos” • Crime – Brown (10.04.) – Campaigning for DNA database • Crime – Clegg – (16.04.) – Prison reform & deterrents for young offenders (However, ascent started pre-debate with manifesto) © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  51. 51. Domestic Issues Dominating Elections No real topic ‘Ownership’ • Clegg’s immigration policy plans caused much controversy • Brown did not manage to dominate economic topics after all • Conservative topics like Crime and Education were not picked up enough © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  52. 52. Clegg gets attention through controversies • Incumbent PM Brown was largely shown in a neutral context • Liberal Clegg caused the most emotional reactions – but stayed top-of-mind • Challenger Cameron could actually not win a significant favourable public perception © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  53. 53. Social Media: Short lived in Attention Twitter coverage follows the traditional media timeline, but is much faster – with the news and gone again Source: Trendistic © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  54. 54. Social Media: Short lived in Attention #leadersdebate: 5.5% of Twitter coverage follows the total twitter activity traditional media timeline, butduring first TV debate - is much faster – with the news and gone againbig as ipad that's as launch Source: Trendistic © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  55. 55. Social Media: Short lived in Attention Social Media in general – and even moreTwitter coverage follows the #leadersdebate: 5.5% of total twitter activity Twitter doestraditional media timeline, butduring first TV debate - is much NOT WANT to – with the news and gone againbig as ipad faster that's as play by launch traditional media rules. Hence, it is largely casual speak: emotional, not balanced – from the heart. Source: Trendistic © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  56. 56. UK Elections - Observations  It’s the first mass-media influenced election - TV debates - NOT (yet) social media  Driven by domestic issues  Everybody lost - End of Labour government - Tories have to form coalition - Liberals could not ‘cash in’ the Clegg bonus © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  57. 57. 2) Basics of measurement: Key approaches that give you the right kick-start  Input vs Output vs Outcomes  PR is always comparative: What’s your benchmark?  Field studies, media content analysis, etc Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  58. 58. 3) PR measurement of new and traditional media  Differences, challenges, and the right approach to take © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  59. 59. Media Measurement is not (only) about Search  Most free tools help you with your search efforts – maybe with monitoring  What about analysis and measurement? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  60. 60. Media Measurement is not (only) about Search  Most free tools help you with your search efforts – maybe with monitoring  What about analysis and measurement? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  61. 61. Media Measurement is not (only) about Search - Numbers are only approximations (what about duplications?) - Are all sources important? Are you excluding your own marketing? - Relevance vs. dates - Normalization (Coke vs. Coca Cola); want to include other brands (e.g. Sprite)? - Are we getting the correct meaning of “coke” © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  62. 62. Social Media Relations: Everything Changes!? Everything Changes Nothing Changes  It’s about two-way  You’ve to manage conversations relationships  You’ve to deal with more  So it’s wires, print, channels broadcast – and social media  We HAVE to listen and understand what’s said  You already: monitor and about us! analyze your media coverage  What about those negative comments and  Not every negative posts? comment means a crisis  The game get’s so much  Already forgot newswires? faster Look at trends over time © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  63. 63. Business Objectives Communications Objectives & Strategy Planning, Execution, Controlling Monitor Analyse Discover Engage research & issues, trends opportunities & & pinpoint promote & strategies for risks in time better the the buzz impact to act influential Originally, measurement is post-mortem analysis. For fast environments, it becomes near-time! © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  64. 64. Monitor Case Study: Automotive It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently. Warren Buffet © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 64
  65. 65. Monitor Analyse What is the context? Break it down: The best way to analyse the big picture is to break it down. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 65
  66. 66. Analyse Ready to dive deeper? Where is your How good is your brand brand image? discussed?? What are the important trends? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 66
  67. 67. Analyse Ready to dive deeper? Who are they talking about? What topics / issues are discussed? How is your media footprint globally? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 67
  68. 68. Analyse Example: Toyota Crisis How bad (good) is it? Where does it happen vs. where How does the story does it start? play out in traditional and social media? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company 68 |
  69. 69. Discover Discovery Issues in Time to Act: Toyota Crisis’ Key Topics iPhone “This is not about searching knowns, this is about uncovering unknowns and understanding the context.” © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 69
  70. 70. Discover Change: Mainly Positive Topics Now for Toyota! iPhone “This is not about searching knowns, this is about uncovering unknowns and understanding the context.” © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 70
  71. 71. 3) PR measurement of new and traditional media  Differences, challenges, and the right approach to take Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  72. 72. 4) Social Media ROI: Measuring your online success  Myths and Realities  How to quantify efforts in blogs, Twitter, etc. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  73. 73. Media Analysis: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting  “Measurement is not counting. Or monitoring. It is not the number of followers, friends, rankings, or scores.  Measurement is a process that requires you to compare results against something — either with your competition or with your own results over time.  You note the change, analyze the reasons why, and improve your program accordingly.” Source: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting, KD Payne © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 73
  74. 74. Media Analysis: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting  “Measurement is not counting. Or monitoring. It is not the number of followers, friends, rankings, or scores.  Measurement is a process that requires you to Show you’re busy – compare results against something — either with your competition or with your own results over time. or indispensable?  You note the change, analyze the reasons why, and improve your program accordingly.” Source: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting, KD Payne © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | 74
  75. 75. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  76. 76. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROA RETURN . ON . ATTENTION . © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  77. 77. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROE RETURN . ON . ENGAGEMENT . © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  78. 78. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROP RETURN . ON . . PARTICIPATION © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  79. 79. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROT RETURN . ON . TRUST . © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  80. 80. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROI RETURN . ON . . INVOLVEMENT © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  81. 81. ROI is a business metric, not a media metric (GAIN FROM INVESTMENT - COST OF INVESTMENT) ROI = COST OF INVESTMENT Can you connect your PR investments ($$$ ) with the financial impact, e.g. sales or savings ($$$)? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  82. 82. Real ROI requires you to connect investments, activities and financial impact! Investments leading to activities $$$ Financial Impact $$$ Source: The Brandbuilder – Basics of Social Media ROI © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  83. 83. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI? ROI RETURN (OUTTAKES) . ON . INVESTMENT . (ACTIVITIES) © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  84. 84. ROI in Social Media? Yes and No! ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  85. 85. ROI in Social Media? Yes and No! ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  86. 86. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics for Communications GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales PlaceIf not #ROI, what%do I do? # of requests meetings awareness of Leads Build your own KPI considering for information product reviews # of speaking engagements your brand % framework, suiting# your requirements, Initiate of blog your brand speakers capabilities and % preferring program mentions # of reviews resources your brand Proactive # of media blogger contacts made outreach # of news releases sent Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  87. 87. Social Media 2 things might help: – 1) The inequality of the web where to 2) The concept of target start? media © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  88. 88. 90-9-1 Principle: The Inequality of the Web Source: Jakob Nielsen - Participation Inequality: Encouraging More Users to Contribute © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  89. 89. Who Are You Listening to – Are You Catching the Long Tail?  How many relevant social media sites are there?  How many should or simply can you monitor or even measure? Re ac h vs . In flu e nc e Source: http://www.longtail.com – Chris Anderson © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  90. 90. Let’s get more concrete: Ratings worth monitoring on …  Blogs  Facebook  Twitter  Youtube © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  91. 91. Ratings worth monitoring on Blogs  Unique visitors per month to your blog  Total posts read  Subscribers to your RSS / email feed  Independent credibilty ratings by external authorities such as Klout, Compete.com or Hubspot  Number of comments  Who is commenting (small players or major players)  Links  Time on site Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  92. 92. Ratings worth monitoring on Blogs  Unique visitors per month to your blog  Total posts read  Subscribers to your RSS / email feed  Independent credibilty ratings by external authorities such as Klout, Adage, Compete.com or Hubspot (with its website and blog gradings)  Number of comments  Who is commenting (small players or major players)  Links  Time on site Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  93. 93. Ratings worth monitoring on Facebook  Number of fans  Types of Fans (ordinary or high value)  Comments Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  94. 94. Ratings worth monitoring on Facebook  Number of fans  Types of Fans (ordinary or high value)  Comments Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  95. 95. Ratings worth monitoring on Twitter  Number of followers  How many lists you are on  How many ReTweets you are generating  The number of Direct Messages  Followers-per-tweet  Klout rating Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  96. 96. Ratings worth monitoring on Twitter  Number of followers  How many lists you are on  How many ReTweets you are generating  The number of Direct Messages  Followers-per-tweet  Klout rating Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  97. 97. Ratings worth monitoring on YouTube  Number of views  Number of subscribers  Quantity of comments Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  98. 98. Ratings worth monitoring on YouTube  Number of views  Number of subscribers  Quantity of comments Sources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  99. 99. 4) Social Media ROI: Measuring your online success  Myths and Realities  How to quantify efforts in blogs, Twitter, etc. Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  100. 100. 5) Measuring with a tight budget  Cost effective tools & applications © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  101. 101. Cost efficient tools that work Quick sharing: Quick sharing: Which tools do Which tools do you currently you currently use? use? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  102. 102. Start Here: Simple Tools for Basic Analysis © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  103. 103. Start Here: Simple Tools for Basic Analysis © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  104. 104. Start Here: Simple Tools for Basic Analysis © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  105. 105. Start Here: Simple Tools for Basic Analysis Remember the order and context: Remember the order and context: 1) Objectives 1) Objectives 2) Strategies 2) Strategies 3) … 3) … 4) Measurements: What for? 4) Measurements: What for? 1) Outputs 1) Outputs 2) Outtakes 2) Outtakes 3) Outcomes 3) Outcomes © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  106. 106. Looking at a more holistic picture © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  107. 107. Use the Right Tools and Correct Content  Not all approaches are right for all companies  Assess who you are - Your staff’s capacity; history with “high- tech” tools  Traditional vs. Social Media - Which channels are you looking at?  Understand what you can / can’t do alone - Hint: Simple search won’t cut it © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  108. 108. 5) Measuring with a tight budget  Cost effective tools & applications Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  109. 109. 6) Post evaluation  Leveraging results for management buy-in and strategic improvements © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  110. 110. 6) Post evaluation You want a seat  Leveraging results for management buy-in on the board table? and strategic improvements © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  111. 111. Translating PR results into the language of business • 60% of companies (PR Week) are measuring PR/ Communications at the request of senior management. – Better start before management asks for it • Use multiple metrics – Show the whole picture through Communications KPIs • Connect the dots between clip counts –trends in coverage and favourability Source: Dow Jones E-book: “Talk to me – 10 tips for translating the PR results into the language of business“. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  112. 112. Indispensable? Use KPIs to show your contribution! • Set your sights on the competition – show the context • Top executives only need a high-level summary of results “…From an executive’s viewpoint, it “…From an executive’s viewpoint, it can be interpreted as the difference can be interpreted as the difference between the PR team being busy and between the PR team being busy and the PR team being indispensable. the PR team being indispensable. Source: Dow Jones E-book: “Talk to me – 10 tips for translating the PR results into the language of business“. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  113. 113. To act strategicly, you’d need a strategy… THEN: Activities & Outputs NOW: Outtakes & Outcomes Tactical Strategic Reactive Pro-active Counting clips Benchmarking messages, competitors Clip books Media Analysis & KPIs Handful of key titles The world of sites, titles, blogs, videos Quantitative Quantitative and qualitative Only human analysis Smart tools & analysis Managing activities & outputs Managing outtakes & outcomes © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  114. 114. Measurement is a Process The measurement process is formed around some basic Situation questions: Planning analysis  What were the goals we wanted to achieve in the first place?  What do we want to measure against? Evaluation Execution  What do we want to compare? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  115. 115. 6) Post evaluation  Leveraging results for management buy-in and strategic improvements Key learnings? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  116. 116. Time for an exercise? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  117. 117. Reputational Risk: It’s all about perception... Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Spreading: Relevance Growing declines interest Emergence: Issue gets Potential: public Known areas YOU? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  118. 118. Exercise: BP = Best Practice?  Form groups of 5-8 people  You are the global communications team for BP now  Think about one on-line and one offline campaign in context of the Output, Outtake and Outcome framework that you would do  Use the template go guide you  Share after 10 minutes http://www.prnewsonline.com/features/Crisis-Expert-With-Oil-Industry-Experience-Weighs-In-on-BP_13958.html?hq_e=el&hq_m=1987647&hq_l=1&hq_v=0af9001ba1 © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  119. 119. Outlook & Summary © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  120. 120. Wrap Up: Strategic Media Measurement Keys to Success 1. Determine what success looks like 2. Use the right tools with the correct content 3. Have a plan to turn output into positive outcomes 4. Collaborate across markets and divisions to establish a consistent measurement program 5. Consider the impact of measuring across languages and cultures © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  121. 121. 1. Determine what success looks like  Benchmark - What’s your image now in your core markets  Conduct a rigorous self-assessment - Spend time up front to know what you’re getting into. - Staffing and ongoing investment  Ask: “Why do we want to measure?” - Whose perception do you want to impact? - Don’t start too wide -- it can distract from core goals - Identify the KPIs which will show success © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  122. 122. 2. Use the right tools and correct content  Not all approaches are right for all clients.  Assess who you are - Your staff’s history with high-tech tools  Traditional vs. Social Media - Are you exposed by not monitoring social media?  Understand why you shouldn’t do it alone - Hint: Search engine’s won’t cut it © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  123. 123. 3. Turn output into positive outcomes  What do you want to do with the data you gather? - Justify spend and headcount - Help prove your value to your organization  Don’t be afraid of what you might find: - Finding out that you are not who you thought you were should be seen as a success, not a failure of the initiative.  Promote your successes internally  Reassess. © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  124. 124. 4. Collaborate for Consistent Measurement • Get all markets and divisions on the same page. - Save time and money with one approach (e.g. through assigning a 3rd party) - Identify the global issues each unit has in common. - Establish consistent metrics with one methodology  But don’t forget to stay local. - Include sets of issues and competitors specific to each region - Measure in the local language © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  125. 125. 5. Consider the impact of measuring across languages and cultures  Some campaigns, markets and products cross borders and some don’t  Your vendor should speak your languages - Not just transliteration of search strings  Ensure equal measurement approaches in multiple languages - Normalized content structure and search approaches © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  126. 126. What we did today?  Understand that it’s not enough to LOOK  busy  NOT talking about ROI!   Focus on KPIs   Look at CONTEXT   Hear about REAL problems and REAL solutions  © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  127. 127. Best Practices in Media Measurement  Use an objective evaluator - Think about governance  Think cause and effect - Connect communications activities to bottom-line business results - Match metrics to your PR strategy and objectives  Think scalable - Marry human and artificial intelligence to cost- effectively manage large volumes of information © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  128. 128. Media Measurement: Where to Start Three Keys to Success  Determine what success looks like  Use the right tools with the correct content  Have a plan to turn output into positive outcomes © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  129. 129. Questions? Thank you. Lars Voedisch Regional Head – Media Intelligence, APAC Dow Jones and Company lars.voedisch@dowjones.com @larsv © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  130. 130. Measuring the Effectiveness of PR Efforts: Are You Busy or Indispensable?  Appendix Lars Voedisch Regional Head – Media Intelligence, APAC Dow Jones and Company lars.voedisch@dowjones.com @larsv © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  131. 131. Outcomes and Outputs Outcomes  The effects of communications: i.e. numbers of people attending your exhibition or show because of the media coverage, number of web hits, etc. Distinguish between outcomes and outputs  Outcomes are the effect of your communications (see above)  Outputs are the number of media releases issued, number of media attending events, number of column centimetres and stories, reach of media coverage, etc © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  132. 132. How to use Media Evaluation to best effect  Set your objectives carefully: all good research starts here  Define your target audiences: who, when, where and why?  Identify your key messages: write them down, be clear and consistent  It’s the content that counts: consider what issues affect you and your sector  Don’t just think about your own coverage: consider your competitors’ too.  Watch for bias: when sourcing materials and interpreting the results.  Decide what output or report you need: not what the others want to sell you.  Win commitment at Board level: by demonstrating measured results.  Share results with the other departments: their interest may help shape the budget.  Use the results: this is for planning and sharing, not for sitting on the shelf. How timely do you need results? © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company | (AMEC, 2005)
  133. 133. Key Benefits of Media Evaluation  To demonstrate the influence that media coverage can have on the attainment of PR objectives  To facilitate more effective audience targeting and reinforce other aspects of PR planning  To analyze key message pick-up in media and among journalists and their audiences  To gather intelligence about a sector, trends and issues (historic and future), and an organization and its peers’ perception in the media  To provide a benchmark against which to measure the effectiveness of media coverage both during a PR programme and in the final analysis  To help build the credibility and influence of PR in organizations, and demonstrate PR’s contribution to strategic business decision-making  To provide a ‘hard’ measure of success to reinforce the case for an expanded role for PR. Institute of Public Relations Toolkit, 2003 © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |
  134. 134. The Future of Media Measurement  Improvements to the mix of humans and machines  Technology improvements around: - machine translation - automated sentiment detection - speech to text (to harness video and podcasts) - discovery algorithms  Improved integration of print media measurement with online advertising metrics, market surveys and other data used for KPIs.  More workflow integration of media measurement tools © Copyright 2010 Dow Jones and Company |

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