Measuring PR in the Digital Age - Evaluating Communications Effectiveness

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Evaluating Communications Effectiveness:
Social & Traditional Media ROI

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Measuring PR in the Digital Age - Evaluating Communications Effectiveness

  1. 1. Evaluating Communications Effectiveness: Social & Traditional Media ROILars Voedisch Georg AckermannManaging Media Consultant, APAC Media Lab Team LeaderDow Jones and Company Dow Jones and Companylars.voedisch@dowjones.com georg.ackermann@dowjones.com@larsv @derackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  2. 2. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  3. 3. Welcome & IntroductionWho are we?Why are we here?What to expect? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  4. 4. Who is… Lars Voedisch?Managing Media Consultant, Asia Pacific• Looking after key clients and prospects in the Public Relations & Corporate Communications industry – in terms of sales enabling and retentionBackground• A professional in the Communications and Knowledge Management arena with more than 10 years experience in the areas of Marketing, Public Relations, Media, Journalism, Strategic Development, Change Management and Intranet/Internet projects.• Living in Asia for about 8 years (Hong Kong/Singapore)• Likes and interested in football (soccer) – playing for “Real Ale Madrid”, diving, skiing, travelling, music, DJ/MC-ing, social media• Speaks German (native), English, French and about 8 words of Chinese• Holds a Master in Economics• Hometown: Hannover (North-Western part of Germany) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  5. 5. Who is… Georg Ackermann? Media Lab Team Leader • Media Report Production• Journalist, Editor, Analyst and Report Writer • Factiva, Dow Jones Insight • Setting up DJ Insight desk in Singapore • Freelancing for German Newspapers • Master in PR and Media Management • English, German, Spanish, French, Catalan © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  6. 6. Who are the people around us?1. Turn to your neighbour(s) – 10 sec2. Learn about him/her – 2 min – Name, Company, Role – Why are you here? – A fun fact…?3. Introduce your neighbour – 1 min ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  7. 7. About Dow Jones: Meet the Family ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 7
  8. 8. Relevant Information → Actionable Intelligence 27,000+ global sources 17M+ companies Other People’s 35M+ executives Web/Social Content Mainstream 16M+ Websites and blogs Media Media Dow Jones Research 150+ researchers 130,000+ indexes Media/VC/Risk Dow JonesOver 150 years News, 2,000 journalists Commentaryof Indispensable & Analysis 84 bureaus 18,000+ daily news itemsContent ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 8
  9. 9. Content + Technology = Relevant Information Dow Jones Content 150 researchers 2000 journalists 11 languages Personalization Wealth Management 18K news items a day Content Content Visualization Investment Management normalization normalization Search Researchers & Premium Content Knowledge Workers 27,000 global sources Discovery 22 languages Investment Banking Over 200K news items a day Metadata Metadata Alerting & Triggers Sales & Trading Symbology Symbology PeopleWeb and Social Media Content Visualization Taxonomy Taxonomy Connections PR & Corp Comm 13K websites Risk & Compliance 60K message boards Integration 16 M blogs Private Markets 300K articles a day Widgets Best of breed Sales technologies Newsletters Company and Executive Info 17 M Company Profiles 35 M Executive ProfilesExtracted from 75 Million Websites TECHNICAL DIVERSE DATA SOURCES TECHNOLOGY PLATFORM CUSTOMERS CAP ABILITIIES 5| ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 9
  10. 10. What WE expect from US• Timeliness• Learn, share & contribute• Have funWhat do YOU expect? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  11. 11. What we will do today &tomorrow?• Understand that it’s not enough to LOOK busy• NOT talking about ROI?!• Focus on KPIs• Look at CONTEXT• Hear about REAL problems and REAL solutions ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  12. 12. Why measure media coverage? Quick discussion Quick discussion in small groups: in small groups: Why do you Why do you want to measure ? want to measure ? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  13. 13. Why measure media coverage?Reason 1: Demonstrate value of PR (e.g. Outputs) – What key initiatives did you drive? Results?Reason 2: Plan & evaluate communications activities across channels and markets (e.g. Outtakes) – How do you connect to publications & journalists, campaigns; what’s your brand perception?Reason 3: Strategic Communications (e.g. Outcomes) – How do your results relate to the budget allocation? Do you measure KPIs linking PR to business results? What is the value PR adds your organization?Reason 4: Discovering opportunities and threats (Radar) – What’s happening in the industry, with my clients; is there a crisis, are there issues…? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  14. 14. Challenge within Organizations: Who ‘owns’ Social Media?Source: Blurring Lines, Turf Battles and Tweets: The Real Impact of Integrated Communications on Marketing and PR ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  15. 15. Challenge within Organizations: Who ‘owns’ Social Media? Who cares?! • The lines between PR and marketing are blurring. • “Turf battles” are evident. • Ownership of social media and blogging still undecided. • Benefits and communication measurement providesSource:common ground. Real Impact of Integrated Communications on Marketing and PR Blurring Lines, Turf Battles and Tweets: The ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  16. 16. Social Media is about 3 things: CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENTSource: Youtube / Old Spice Channel ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  17. 17. Social Media is about 3 things: CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENTSource: Youtube / Old Spice Channel ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  18. 18. Session 1Aligning Measurement with Business Objectives ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  19. 19. 1) Aligning measurement with business objectives• Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives & setting smart goals Too many communicators Too many communicators work very hard on tactics… work very hard on tactics… …that DON’T support corporate goals! …that DON’T support corporate goals! ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  20. 20. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness GoalsSource: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  21. 21. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Make business GOALS your communications goals, then develop STRATEGIES:Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  22. 22. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Conduct a gap analysis to understand your benchmarks and to decide what are your priorities• Choose metrics to measure the resultsSource: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  23. 23. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• You can’t manage what you don’t measure• What impact do your programs have – what are the results?Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  24. 24. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Example: Bicycle Manufacturer• The challenge is to measure your success in a meaningful way!Source: Align Corporate Communications to Achieve Business Goals, David Meerman Scott, A Dow Jones/Factiv a Whitepaper ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  25. 25. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Example: Bicycle Manufacturer ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  26. 26. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Example: Bicycle Manufacturer ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  27. 27. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Example: Bicycle Manufacturer ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  28. 28. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals• Example: Bicycle Manufacturer ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  29. 29. Align Corporate Communications to AchieveBusiness Goals The challenge is to measure your success in a meaningful way! ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  30. 30. Business Objectives Communications Objectives & Strategy Planning, Execution, Controlling Monitor Analyse Discover Engage research & issues, trends opportunities & & pinpoint promote & strategies for risks in time better the the buzz impact to act influentialOriginally, measurement is post-mortem analysis. For fast environments, it becomes near-time! ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  31. 31. Simple start: Smart Goal Setting for your (Social) Media Strategy • Goals drive the type of measurements you are going to use • What’s your ultimate objective: 1. Awareness 2. Image / Reputation 3. Sales 4. Cost savings 5. Something else?Source: 25 Must Read Social Media Marketing Tips ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 31
  32. 32. Group Exercise: Objective Setting1. Form a group of 3-5 people2. Briefly introduce yourselves3. Choose one of the three case studies – G20 – Qantas – ASX / SGX4. You have 15 minutes to work on these tasks and then share with all: 1. Define max. 3 Communications Objectives 2. What strategies would you chose for these objectives (1-3 per objective)? 3. What could be desired results of your communications approach (How would you know if you were successful)? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 32
  33. 33. Case Study: G20 Summit in Korea• Situation: – Following an agreement between leaders of the world’s major economies (Group of 20; G20) to institutionalize the “G20” forum as a permanent council on global economic cooperation, South Korea hosted the Group of 20 summit in November 2010 – You are part of Korea’s Tourism Organization• Define Communications Objectives: How could you leverage the G20 summit?• What strategies would you chose for these objectives?• What could be desired results of your communications approach? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  34. 34. Case Study: Qantas Engine Failure• Situation: – Just before Qantas’ 90th anniversary, two flights reported severe engine failures in November 2010. – A Qantas Boeing 747 had been forced to turn back to Singapore with engine troubles, not long after it left the airstrip en route to Sydney. – The incident came a day after a Qantas Airbus A380 returned to make an emergency landing in Singapore after an explosion in an engine shortly after take-off. – You are a member of Qantas Corporate Communications team• Define Communications Objectives: How should you react to the situation?• What strategies would you chose for these objectives?• What could be desired results of your communications approach? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  35. 35. Case Study: SGX/ASX merger• Situation: – End of October, the Singapore stock exchange (SGX) unveiled a multi-billion dollar bid for the company that owns the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) in Sydney. – If approved, the $8.3bn takeover would mark the first stock exchange merger in the Asia Pacific region. – The deal would enhance Singapore as a major financial hub in the region and benefit Australian investors by giving them greater access to Asian markets. A merged exchange would hope to compete more effectively with Hong Kong. – You are member of the SGX Corporate Communications team.• Define Communications Objectives: Given the different reactions in Australian media, what messages would you send out?• What strategies would you chose for these objectives?• What could be desired results of your communications approach? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  36. 36. Group Exercise: Objective Setting1. Form a group of 3-5 people2. Briefly introduce yourselves3. Choose one of the three case studies – G20 – Qantas – ASX / SGX4. You have 15 minutes to work on these tasks and then share with all: 1. Define max. 3 Communications Objectives 2. What strategies would you chose for these objectives (1-3 per objective)? 3. What could be desired results of your communications approach (How would you know if you were successful)? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 36
  37. 37. Group Exercise: Objective Setting - SharingPlease share with all:• What’s your case study and why did you choose it?• Please share the main answers/results for these tasks: 1. Define max. 3 Communications Objectives 2. What strategies would you chose for these objectives (1-3 per objective)? 3. What could be desired results of your communications approach (How would you know if you were successful)? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 37
  38. 38. 1) Aligning measurement with business objectives• Managing what you measure, identifying the right objectives & setting smart goals Key learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  39. 39. Social Media is about 3 things: CONTENT, CONTENT, CONTENTSource: Youtube / Old Spice Channel ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  40. 40. Session 2Basics of Measurement: Key Approaches that giveYou the Right Kick-Start ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  41. 41. How to measure media coverage? Quick discussion Quick discussion in small groups: in small groups: What do you What do you currently currently measure ? measure ? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  42. 42. What can we look at? What’s your share of voice? What are the What’s the context? main topics? Where is the conversation? Who’s talking? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  43. 43. Understanding PR Measurement1. Measurement is research, research is measurement.2. PR should link communications and business objectives.3. Measurement must move beyond simple outputs.4. There is no singular industry standard.5. Approaches to measurement are evolutionary. “We aren’t in the business of securing media coverage. We’re in the business of projecting and protecting the reputations of organizations.” Alan Chumley, Director of Measurement for Hill & Knowlton, Toronto ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  44. 44. Determine what success looks like• Benchmark – What’s your image now in your core markets• Conduct a rigorous self-assessment – Spend time up front to know what you’re getting into.• Ask: “Why do we want to measure?” – Whose perception do you want to impact? – Don’t start too wide -- it can distract from core goals – Identify the KPIs which will show success ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  45. 45. Turn Output into Positive Outcomes • What do you want to do with the data you gather? – Justify spend and headcount – Help prove your value to your organization • Don’t be afraid of what you might find: – Finding out that you are not who you thought you were should be seen as a success, not a failure of the initiative. • Promote your successes internally • Reassess.Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  46. 46. Turn Output into Positive Outcomes • Outputs – what is generated as a result of a PR program or campaign • Outtakes – what audiences have understood and/or heeded and/or responded to • Outcomes – quantifiable changes in awareness, knowledge, attitude, opinion and behavior levelsSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  47. 47. Too dry, too theoretical,too complicated? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  48. 48. Example – FIFA WorldcupGOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?”Become Play in the final Score goals Win matches 2010 Worldthe best round in South Championcountry Africa 7 matches 16 goals scored Won 5 games 3rd Place played 7 matches 8 goals scored Won 6 games WORLD CHAMPION played How to translate this to PR? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  49. 49. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Place product # meetings % awareness of your # of requests for Leads reviews # of speaking brand information Initiate speakers engagements % considering your program # of blog mentions brand Proactive # of reviews % preferring your blogger outreach brand # of media contacts made # of news releases sentSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  50. 50. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Group Exercise: of your # of requests for Place product # meetings % awareness Leads reviews # of speaking brand information Use your initial exercise example Initiate speakers engagements % considering your program # of blog mentions brand (G20 / #Qantas / SGX-ASX) Proactive of reviews % preferring your blogger outreach brand and #work out suitable of media contacts made Outputs -# of news releases - Outcomes Outtakes sentSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  51. 51. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Place product # meetings Leads reviews BYO: % awareness of your # of requests for brand information # of speaking Build your own KPIconsidering your Initiate speakers program % framework, brand engagements # of blog mentions suiting your requirements, Proactive blogger outreach % preferring your brand # of reviews # of media contacts capabilities and resources made # of news releases sentSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  52. 52. Example DHL:Built our own KPI framework, suiting our requirements, capabilities and resources ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  53. 53. Case Study :Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales Key Message A Key Message B Key Message C• Business Goal: time for a It’s Easy-to-use – not Increasing – Sell more Palm Centro phones smart decision just ‘another’ personal• Communications Objectives: computer productivity on – Introduce lifestyle & non-tech media influencers the go – Attract fashion phone upgraders – Encourage PalmCentro is the usersThrough it’s intuitive user Choosing the handheld to change to a smartphone Messaging, email, built-in• Measurement Metrics:lysis for Tone Ana decision ultimate smart Tone Ana lysis interface and the capabilities to view & edit fashion phone upgraders combination of touch documents and access to – Outputs: who want both style & screen and keyboard, the On-Messa ge Ana lysis On-Messa ge applications, over 20,000 Ana lysis • Number of articles smart phone Centro is the ideal partner makes the Centro THE functionalities • Audience reach for young, energetic and 3 3 customizable mobile sociable users who want a companion for dynamic – Outtakes: smart phone to organize junior- to mid-level • How favourable is No. of theirviewed by the media the device lives and No. of Positives professionals to help Positives • Is the coverage on No. of relationships on the go message them managing their busy No. of work and social live No. On Message – Outcomes: Number of phones sold Neutrals Neutrals No. On Message No. Not On Message No. of No. Not On Message• Result: No. of Negatives Negatives – Close to 80 articles; most positive (rest neutral); nearly all on message 23 23 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  54. 54. Case Study : Measuring PR’s Contribution to Sales • Business Goal: – Sell more airplane tickets • Communications Objective: – Drive traffic to web site from press releases and media stories • Measurement Metrics: – Outputs: Number of articles – Outtakes: Awareness of Southwest service to the region; % increase in unique visitors to web site from PR site – Outcomes: Number of tickets sold • Result: – Over $40 million in ticket sales from press releases.Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  55. 55. Case Study : Using Research to Win Support for Your Strategy • Business Goal: – Win contracts • Communications Objective: – Position the brand as innovative and technologically superior • Measurement Metrics: – Outputs: Number of trade press articles – Outtakes: Media acceptance of client spokespeople as industry authorities: share of spokespeople quoted; share of favorable positioning on key issues – Outcomes: Win contracts • Results: – Went from last place in share-of-quotes to first in 12 months and increased share-of-quotes 10% to 70%. – Doubled visibility of brand in 12 months – Increase in the number of competitive contracts wonSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  56. 56. Case Study: Media PerceptionsUK General Elections 2010 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  57. 57. UK Elections - Background• Since WW II, the UK did not have a coalition government• It is the first time TV debates for the candidates were introduced• Gordon Brown did not go through public elections before• UK strongly affected by global financial crisis ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  58. 58. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze06 Apr – Brown calls elections ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  59. 59. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze16 Apr – Clegg ‘wins’ first TV debate (Domestic policy) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  60. 60. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze22 Apr – Second TV debate helps Cameron and Clegg (International affairs) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  61. 61. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze28 Apr - Brown calls 65-year-old widow ‘bigoted woman’, apologizes ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  62. 62. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze29 Apr – Cameron does well during third TV debate (Economy & Taxes) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  63. 63. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media Analyze6 May – Polling Day ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  64. 64. Public Timeline: Traditional vs. Social Media AnalyzeSocial vs Traditional Media:• Higher amplitudes• Looking for ‘news’• Generally in-sync 11/12 May – Government forms, Cameron becomes PM ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  65. 65. Early stages: Brown dominates until first TV debate Brown dominates the media•06 Apr – Brown calls elections•16 Apr – Clegg ‘wins’ first TV debate ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  66. 66. Phenomenon Clegg: Liberal leader’s star starts rising even before the first TV debate-Nick Clegg’s rise started before the 1st debate – not only down to TV appearance.-Comparing days immediately before and after the debate, Cameron lost ground, Clegg gained ground Brown remained stable (based on volume). ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  67. 67. Candidate Presence – Cameron 2010 Clegg received more media attention than eventual Prime minister Cameron until shortly before the confirmation of a conservative led government. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  68. 68. Domestic Issues – Immigration / Crime• Immigration – Brown – (31.03.) – “Controlling Immigration for a Fairer Britain” keynote speech• Immigration – Clegg – (16.04.) – “good/bad immigration”, “other parties talk tough on immigration, but deliver chaos”• Crime – Brown (10.04.) – Campaigning for DNA database• Crime – Clegg – (16.04.) – Prison reform & deterrents for young offenders (However, ascent started pre-debate with manifesto) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  69. 69. Domestic Issues Dominating ElectionsNo real topic ‘Ownership’ • Clegg’s immigration policy plans caused much controversy • Brown did not manage to dominate economic topics after all • Conservative topics like Crime and Education were not picked up enough ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  70. 70. Clegg gets attention through controversies• Incumbent PM Brown was largely shown in a neutral context• Liberal Clegg caused the most emotional reactions – but stayed top-of-mind• Challenger Cameron could actually not win a significant favourable public perception ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  71. 71. Social Media: Short lived in AttentionSocial Media ingeneral – andeven more #leadersdebate: 5.5% ofTwitter doesTwitter coverage follows the total twitter activityNOT WANT to traditional media timeline, butduring first TV debate - is muchplay by faster – with the news and gone againbig as ipad thats as launchtraditional mediarules.Hence, it islargely casualspeak:emotional, notbalanced – fromthe heart. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  72. 72. UK Elections - Observations• It’s the first mass-media influenced election – TV debates – NOT (yet) social media• Driven by domestic issues• Everybody lost – End of Labour government – Tories have to form coalition – Liberals could not ‘cash in’ the Clegg bonus ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  73. 73. 2) Basics of measurement: Key approaches that give you the right kick-start• Input vs Output vs Outcomes• PR is always comparative: What’s your benchmark?• Field studies, media content analysis, etc Key learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  74. 74. Old Spice Answers: @TheEllenShowSource: Youtube / Old Spice Channel ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  75. 75. Session 3Major Research & Evaluation Models © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  76. 76. What PR professionals like to do… © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  77. 77. DATAcrunching ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  78. 78. “Making decisions based on datasaves time and boosts yourcredibility.” KD Paine © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  79. 79. We suggest that you remove the term“measurement” from the equation altogether, andreplace it with “data-driven decision-making.”Focus on “getting data with which to make betterdecisions” KD Paine © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  80. 80. Some terminology… Primary research (also called field research) involves the collection of data that does not already exist, which is research to collect original data Secondary research (also known as desk research) involves the summary, collation and/or synthesis of existing research rather than primary research Source: Wikipedia © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  81. 81. Primary data (or raw data) is a term for data collectedon source which has not been subjected to processingor any other manipulationSecondary data is data collected by someone otherthan the user (processed data) © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  82. 82. Analysis of secondary data… Market research (usually surveys, interviews of focusgroups)… Customer satisfaction research (usually surveys)… Employee surveys that may have been undertaken by HR… Industry or sector studies that have been published… Publicly released polls (such as Gallup)… Case studies (particularly useful in times of crisis whenthere is usually no time to conduct primary research) Source: Jim Macnamara © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  83. 83. What PR professionals like to do… Networking and Partying © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  84. 84. …and the day after Evaluation © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  85. 85. Relationship ManagementRelationship Level MeasurementMeasuring the relationship with influencers by gainingfeedback before and during an event.… Do the media respond immediately to an invitation?… Do they confirm their attendance?… When they refuse, do they explain why?… Do they request information if unable to attend?… Collect feedback during the event Source: AMEC © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  86. 86. Relationship Management How does it change in the digital age? Different communication? Different audience? Different tools? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  87. 87. Exercise:Let’s set up an online survey…You recently launched a campaign/organised an event.Now you are interested in feedback from your audience.1. What are 3 important questions you want to ask?2. Suggestion: Sign up to SurveyMonkey.com to create thequestionnaire. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  88. 88. 1.2. Name it3. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  89. 89. 4. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  90. 90. 5. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  91. 91. TheAVEdebate© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  92. 92. AVE (Advertising ValueEquivalents)… puts monetary value on mediacoverage… measures column inches orbroadcast seconds (“earnedmedia”)… multiplies these by theequivalent cost of advertising inthe same media © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  93. 93. AVE (Advertising Value Equivalents) … credible measurement tool to assess prominence … but what about sentiment, exclusivity and context?© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  94. 94. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  95. 95. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  96. 96. Advertising … - is purchased - complete control to the advertiser for content, placement and frequency - is almost always positive© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  97. 97. Publicity/Earned media …- control is with the medium- can result into positive, neutral or negative messages © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  98. 98. AVE – not really equivalent- limited to the cost of the campaign- not considering the impact at the audience- often non-comparative- limited to small group of mediaWhat about newswires or social media (Twitter, Facebook)? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  99. 99. Alternatives? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  100. 100. What are the results of the PR activity?• PR efforts contribute to organisational goals• output, outtake, outcome• awareness (output), understanding (outtake),attitudes (outtake), behaviours (outcome)• can be transaction/outcome-oriented (sales,membership, donations, enrolment) Source: IPR © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  101. 101. What are the results of the PR activity?• improved relationships• increased trust• higher levels of satisfaction and loyalty• enhanced reputation• meeting expectations for social responsibilities Source: IPR © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  102. 102. “Results-based” methods analyse…• tone of the message (favourable, unfavourable, neutral,balanced, unbalanced)• prominence and placement• appearance of key messages• credibility and targeted reach of the medium, impressions• comparison to previous performance, expected results orcompetitors Source: IPR © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  103. 103. Exercise:Sentiment analysis © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  104. 104. Major Research & Evaluation Models Key learnings? Key learnings? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  105. 105. Session 4Social Media ROI: Measuring Your Online Success ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  106. 106. Media Measurement is not (only) aboutSearch• Most free tools help you with your search efforts – maybe with monitoring• What about analysis and measurement? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  107. 107. Media Measurement is not (only) aboutSearch• Most free tools help you with your search efforts – maybe with monitoring• What about analysis and measurement? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  108. 108. Media Measurement is not (only) aboutSearch– Numbers are only approximations (what about duplications?)– Are all sources important? Are you excluding your own marketing?– Relevance vs. dates– Normalization (Coke vs. Coca Cola); want to include other brands (e.g. Sprite)?– Are we getting the correct meaning of “coke” ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  109. 109. Media Analysis: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting • “Measurement is not counting. Or monitoring. It is not the number of followers, friends, rankings, or scores. • Measurement is a process that requires you to compare results against something — either with your competition or with your own results over time. • You note the change, analyze the reasons why, and improve your program accordingly.”Source: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting, KD Payne ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 109
  110. 110. Media Analysis: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting • “Measurement is not counting. Or monitoring. It is not the number of followers, friends, rankings, or scores. • Measurement is a process that requires you to Show you’re busy – compare results against something — either with your competition or with your own results over time. or indispensable? • You note the change, analyze the reasons why, and improve your program accordingly.”Source: Stop confusing ROI with results, and measurement with counting, KD Payne ©2010 Dow Jones & Company 110
  111. 111. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  112. 112. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROA RETURN . ON . ATTENTION . ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  113. 113. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROE RETURN . ON . ENGAGEMENT . ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  114. 114. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROP RETURN . ON . . PARTICIPATION ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  115. 115. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROT RETURN . ON . TRUST . ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  116. 116. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROI RETURN . ON . . INVOLVEMENT ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  117. 117. ROI is a business metric, not a media metric (GAIN FROM INVESTMENT - COST OF INVESTMENT)ROI = COST OF INVESTMENTCan you connect your PR investments($$$ ) with the financial impact, e.g. salesor savings ($$$)? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  118. 118. Real ROI requires you to connect investments, activities and financial impact!Investments leading to activities $$$ Financial Impact $$$Source: The Brandbuilder – Basics of Social Media ROI ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  119. 119. Myth: Are you sure you mean ROI?ROI RETURN(OUTTAKES) . ON . INVESTMENT . (ACTIVITIES) ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  120. 120. ROI in Social Media? Yes and No!ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  121. 121. ROI in Social Media? Yes and No!ROI RETURN . ON . . INVESTMENT ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  122. 122. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics for Communications GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer “So what?” Sales Leads If not #ROI, what% do I do? # of requests for Place product reviews meetings # of speaking awareness of your brand information Build your own KPIconsidering your engagements Initiate speakers % framework, brand program # of blog mentions suiting# of reviews requirements, Proactive your % preferring your blogger outreach brand # of media contacts capabilities and resources made # of news releases sentSource: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  123. 123. 2 things might help: 1) The inequality of the webSocial 2) The concept of targetMedia media –where tostart? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  124. 124. 90-9-1 Principle: The Inequality of the WebSource: Jakob Nielsen - Participation Inequality: Encouraging More Users to Contribute ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  125. 125. Who Are You Listening to –Are You Catching the Long Tail?• How many relevant social media sites are there?• How many should or simply can you monitor or even measure? Re ac h vs . In flu e nc eSource: http://www.longtail.com – Chris Anderson ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  126. 126. Social Media (for PR) has two Core Metrics • Influence • EngagementSources: Social Media Metrics ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  127. 127. Let’s get more concrete:Ratings worth monitoring on …• Blogs• Facebook• Twitter• Youtube ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  128. 128. Ratings worth monitoring on Blogs • Unique visitors per month to your blog • Total posts read • Subscribers to your RSS / email feed • Independent credibilty ratings by external authorities such as Klout, Compete.com or Hubspot • Number of comments • Who is commenting (small players or major players) • Links • Time on siteSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  129. 129. Ratings worth monitoring on Blogs • Unique visitors per month to your blog • Total posts read • Subscribers to your RSS / email feed • Independent credibilty ratings by external authorities such as Klout, Adage, Compete.com or Hubspot (with its website and blog gradings) • Number of comments • Who is commenting (small players or major players) • Links • Time on siteSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring Dow Jones & Company ©2010 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  130. 130. Ratings worth monitoring on Facebook • Number of fans • Types of Fans (ordinary or high value) • CommentsSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  131. 131. Ratings worth monitoring on Facebook • Number of fans • Types of Fans (ordinary or high value) • CommentsSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring Dow Jones & Company ©2010 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  132. 132. Ratings worth monitoring on Twitter • Number of followers • How many lists you are on • How many ReTweets you are generating • The number of Direct Messages • Followers-per-tweet • Klout ratingSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  133. 133. Ratings worth monitoring on Twitter • Number of followers • How many lists you are on • How many ReTweets you are generating • The number of Direct Messages • Followers-per-tweet • Klout ratingSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring Dow Jones & Company ©2010 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  134. 134. Ratings worth monitoring on YouTube • Number of views • Number of subscribers • Quantity of commentsSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  135. 135. Ratings worth monitoring on YouTube • Number of views • Number of subscribers • Quantity of commentsSources: 20 Social Media Ratings You Should Be Monitoring Dow Jones & Company ©2010 ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  136. 136. Old Spice Campaign: Looking at the ResultsSource: W + K Old Spice Case Study ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  137. 137. 4) Social Media ROI: Measuring your online success• Myths and Realities• How to quantify efforts in blogs, Twitter, etc. Key learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  138. 138. Session 5PR Measurement of New & Traditional Media © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  139. 139. Social Media RelationsEverything Changes?Yes!• It’s about two-way conversations• You’ve to deal with more channels• We HAVE to listen and understand what’s said about us!• What about those negative comments and posts?• The game get’s so much faster © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  140. 140. Social Media RelationsEverything Changes?No!• You’ve to manage relationships• So it’s wires, print, broadcast – and social media• You already: monitor and analyse your media coverage• Not every negative comment means a crisis• Already forgot newswires? Look at trends over time © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  141. 141. Communications Objectives & Strategy Planning, Execution, Controlling Monitor Analyse Discover Engageresearch & issues, trends opportunities & & pinpoint promote & strategies for risks in time better the the buzz impact to act influential © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  142. 142. Social Media Relations Everything Changes?Originally,measurement waspost-mortemanalysis. For fast environments, it becomes near-time! © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  143. 143. It takes 20 years to build a reputation and fiveminutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently. Warren Buffet © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  144. 144. Monitor© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  145. 145. Monitor© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  146. 146. Monitor© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  147. 147. Monitor Analyse Analyse -Break it down © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  148. 148. Monitor Analyse© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  149. 149. Monitor Analyse© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  150. 150. Analyse What are topics/ issues discussed? Who are they talking about? How is your media footprint globally?How good is your brand image? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  151. 151. Analyse What are trends in traditional vs. social media? What are Who is writingkeywords of your about you?brand coverage? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  152. 152. Discover© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  153. 153. Focus on Asia © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  154. 154. How to reach out in Asia? Source: Ogilvy Public Relations © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  155. 155. How to reach out in Asia? Source: comScore © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  156. 156. How to reach out in Asia? Source: comScore © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  157. 157. How to reach out in Asia?China Source: Ogilvy Public Relations © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  158. 158. How to reach out in Asia? http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/global/social-media- dominates-asia-pacific-internet-usage/ © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  159. 159. Top Sites in…1. Yahoo.com Hong Kong2. Facebook.com3. Google.com.hk 谷歌4. Youtube.com5. Google.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  160. 160. Top Sites in…1. Baidu.com China2. QQ.com3. Taobao.com 淘宝网4. Sina.com.cn 新浪新闻中心5. Google.com.hk 谷歌 © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  161. 161. Top Sites in…1. Google.com.vn Vietnam2. Google.com3. Yahoo.com4. VnExpress.net5. Zing.vn © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  162. 162. Top Sites in…1. Facebook.com Indonesia2. Google.co.id3. Google.com4. Blogger.com5. Yahoo.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  163. 163. Top Sites in…1. Yahoo.com Taiwan2. Facebook.com3. Wretch.cc 無名小站4. Google.com.tw 繁體中文搜尋5. Youtube.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  164. 164. Top Sites in…1. Naver.com 네이버 Korea2. Google.com3. Facebook.com4. Yahoo.com5. Daum.net 다음daum © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  165. 165. Top Sites in…1. Google.co.in India2. Google.com3. Facebook.com4. Yahoo.com5. Youtube.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  166. 166. Top Sites in…1. Facebook.com Singapore2. Google.com.sg3. Youtube.com4. Yahoo.com5. Google.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  167. 167. Top Sites in… Malaysia1. Facebook.com2. Google.com.my3. Google.com4. Yahoo.com5. Youtube.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  168. 168. PR measurement of new and traditional mediaDifferences, challenges, and the right approach to take Key learnings? Key learnings? © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  169. 169. Session 6Measuring with a tight budget:Cost-Effective Tools & Applications ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  170. 170. What’s already there?•Who’s using Twitter / what tools / what do youmeasure•Facebook © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  171. 171. Measuring success of your Facebook EffortsWhat Facebook Insights can do for you:•page views•unique views•total interactions•wall posts•discussion topics•Fans•New Fans•Removed Fans•Reviews•Photo Views•Audio Plays•Video Play ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  172. 172. Getting started with social media analysis tools •Overview: Some free tools •Get your hands ‘dirty’ for your : • News • Blogs • Twitter • Facebook © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  173. 173. Social Web www.socialmention.com www.collecta.com www.boardreader.comwww.blogsearch.google.com http://technorati.com/search Twitter www.klout.net www.tweetstats.com http://twittercounter.com http://twitrratr.com http://tweetfeel.com http://wefollow.com Facebook Search/Web www.booshaka.com www.google.com/insights/search www.kurrently.com www.google.com/trends http://itstrending.com www.google.com/analytics http://youropenbook.org http://facepinch.com © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  174. 174. Check the following Twitter tools for your casestudy context: • twitrratr.com • tweetfeel.com • twitter.com/search • twitterstats.comWhat are 1) the pros / cons, 2) useful metrics © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  175. 175. Check the following Facebook tools for your casestudy context: • Facebook – search • booshaka.com • kurrently.comWhat are 1) the pros / cons, 2) useful metrics © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  176. 176. Check the following Social Web tools for yourcase study context: • Socialmention.com • Klout.comWhat are 1) the pros / cons, 2) useful metrics © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  177. 177. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  178. 178. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  179. 179. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  180. 180. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  181. 181. Understanding what you want to track: • What is your goal? • Do you want to track how people are sharing your website? • Do you want to track a specific social media campaign? • Or maybe you’re just interested in trends related to a specific meme or social media phenomenon? Think about your Case Study and how to use these tools.Source: Mashable – Track Social Media Analytics © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  182. 182. Problems and challenges of free tools • I have to do it myself • Provides me only raw data • External perspective is missing • Limited language analysis • Free tools are specific, limited • Methodology not always transparent © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  183. 183. Session 6Measuring with a tight budget:Cost-Effective Tools & ApplicationsKey learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  184. 184. Old Spice Reaction: World VisionSource: Youtube / Old Spice Channel ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  185. 185. Session 7Crisis Management:Monitoring & Mitigation Effectiveness ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  186. 186. Nestlés social media crisis Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeaces video campaign ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  187. 187. Activistschange theirFacebookprofilephotos toanti-Nestléslogans andstart postingto the Nestléfan page Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeaces video campaign ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  188. 188. Activists Nestlé: “To repeat: we Nestlé: “To repeat: wechange their welcome your welcome yourFacebook comments, but please comments, but pleaseprofile dont post using an dont post using anphotos to altered version of any altered version of anyanti-Nestlé of our logos as your of our logos as yourslogans and profile pic--they will be profile pic--they will bestart posting deleted” deleted”to the Nestléfan page Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeaces video campaign ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  189. 189. Activists Nestlé: “To repeat: we Nestlé: “To repeat: wechange their welcome your welcome yourFacebook comments, but please comments, but pleaseprofile dont post using an Now it dont went using an all post Now iteven wentworse with allphotos to altered version of with even version of any altered worse any kinds of criticism, allegations kindsof our logos as your of criticism, allegationsanti-Nestlé of our logos as your and simple insults being and simple insults being be profile pic--they willslogans and postedprofilebottledwater be pic--they will posted(e.g. bottled water (e.g. deleted”start posting deleted” dispute in the US, “killing dispute in the US, “killingto the Nestlé babies”…)fan page babies”…) Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeaces video campaign ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  190. 190. Activists Nestlé: “To repeat: we Nestlé: “To repeat: wechange their welcome your welcome yourFacebook comments, but please comments, but pleaseprofile dont post using an post Key learnings: Now it dont went using an all Now iteven wentworse with allphotos to altered version of with even version of any altered worse any kinds of criticism, allegations kindsof our logos as your of criticism, allegationsanti-Nestlé of our logos as your and simple insults being and simple insults Control? Dont use being profile pic--they will beslogans and profile pic--they will be posted (e.g. bottledlawyers to take posted (e.g. bottledwater deleted” waterstart posting deleted” “killing dispute in the US, “killing off the dispute in the US, thingsto the Nestlé babies”…)fan page babies”…) Nestlé Internet unwillingly it, Admit it, stop put public and apologize. FAST! attention to Greenpeaces Customers video you are criticizing telling you campaign very something valuable ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  191. 191. Activists Nestlé: “To repeat: we Nestlé: “To repeat: wechange their welcome your welcome yourFacebook comments, but please comments, but pleaseprofile dont post using an post Key learnings: Now it dont went using an all Now iteven wentworse with allphotos to altered version of with even version of any altered worse any kinds of criticism, allegations kindsof our logos as your of criticism, allegationsanti-Nestlé of our logos as your and simple insults being and simple insults Control? You never being profile pic--they will beslogans and profile pic--they will be posted (e.g. bottledreally had it! posted (e.g. bottledwater deleted” waterstart posting deleted” “killing dispute in the US, “killing dispute in the US,to the Nestlé babies”…)fan page babies”…) Nestlé stop it, Admit it, What are your What are your and apologize. unwillingly FAST! Rules of Engagement? put public Rules of Engagement?A crisis response protocol? CustomersA crisis response protocol? criticizing you are attention to How fast can you react?Greenpeaces How fast can you react? telling you Who decides? Who decides? video very something valuable campaign ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  192. 192. Reputational Risk: It’s all about perception... Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Spreading: Relevance Growing declines interest Emergence: Issue getsPotential: publicKnown areas YOUR BRAND? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  193. 193. Reputational Risk: It’s all about perception... Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Spreading: Relevance Growing declines interest Emergence: Issue getsPotential: public If a crisis happens:Known areas Get it fast, YOUR Get it right, Get it out, and BRAND? Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin
  194. 194. Reputational Risk: It’s all about perception...33% of global CCOs Establishment:33% of global CCOs Full crisisare not prepared forare not prepared forsocial media based Spreading: Erosion: social media based Relevancereputation threats !!! Growingreputation threats !!! declines interest Emergence: Issue getsPotential: public If a crisis happens:Known areas Get it fast, YOUR Get it right, Get it out, and BRAND? Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin
  195. 195. Reputational Risk: It’s all about perception... Exercise: Establishment: Exercise: Full crisis What are crisis What are crisis indicators you can Erosion: indicators you can Spreading: Relevance measure? Growing measure? declines interest Emergence: Issue getsPotential: publicKnown areas YOUR BRAND? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  196. 196. Exercise: BP = Best Practice?• Form groups of 5-8 people• You are the global communications team for BP now• Think about one on-line and one offline campaign in context of the Output, Outtake and Outcome framework that you would do• Use the template go guide you• Share after 10 minutes ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  197. 197. The majority of all crises come from within anorganization. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  198. 198. Session 7Crisis Management:Monitoring & Mitigation EffectivenessKey learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  199. 199. Session 8PR Measurement Industry Today ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  200. 200. Fragmentation &ConsolidationBIG offerhttp://wiki.kenburbary.com/social-meda-monitoring-wiki/ 149 providers © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  201. 201. Cision © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  202. 202. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  203. 203. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  204. 204. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  205. 205. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  206. 206. © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  207. 207. Quick Provider check • Analysed content: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Blogs, Forums and Traditional News Publications (Archive) • paid or free • country/region-focus or global, supported languages • industry-focus • automated, tool-focus or manual analysis • price and support • simple press clipping service or complex analysis platform © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  208. 208. There is no perfect solution!What are your needs and resources? >> next: The Future of Media Measurement © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  209. 209. The Future ofMedia Measurement Kraftwerk The Man-Machine, 1978 © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  210. 210. Kraftwerk Computer World, 1981© Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  211. 211. The Future ofMedia MeasurementImprovements to the mix of humans and machinesTechnology improvements around• machine translation• automated sentiment detection• speech to text (to harness video and podcasts)• discovery algorithms• cluster analysis - how certain words are gathering,“clustering” relative to a search topic © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  212. 212. The Future ofMedia Measurement• Improved integration of print mediameasurement with online advertising metrics,market surveys and other data used for KPIs• More workflow integration ofmedia measurement tools• Measurement and MediaManagement coming together © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  213. 213. Get Help © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  214. 214. International Association for Measurement and Evaluation ofCommunication• AMEC’s first international chapter in the USA• Global agency research heads and US-based AMEC membersCision, VMS, Dow Jones and Burrelles Luce• Developed measurement principles, presented and agreedat this year’s AMEC European Summit on Measurement inBarcelona, together with the Institute for Public Relations (IPR)• Asian Chapter launched in October 2010 © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  215. 215. AMEC: Barcelona Principles1. Importance of Goal Setting and Measurement2. Measuring the Effect on Outcomes is Preferred to Measuring Outputs3. The Effect on Business Results Can and Should Be Measured Where Possible4. Media Measurement Requires Quantity and Quality5. AVEs are not the Value of Public Relations6. Social Media Can and Should be Measured7. Transparency and Replicability are Paramount to Sound Measurement © Georg Ackermann ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  216. 216. Session 8PR Measurement Industry TodayKey learnings? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  217. 217. Session 9Post Evaluation:Start with the End in Mind ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  218. 218. 6) Post evaluation You want a seat at the board table? ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  219. 219. Translating PR results into the language of business• 60% of companies (PR Week) are measuring PR/ Communications at the request of senior management. – Better start before management asks for it• Use multiple metrics – Show the whole picture through Communications KPIs• Connect the dots between clip counts –trends in coverage and favourabilitySource: Dow Jones E-book: “Talk to me – 10 tips for translating the PR results into the language of business“. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  220. 220. Indispensable? Use KPIs to show your contribution!• Set your sights on the competition – show the context• Top executives only need a high-level summary of results“…From an executive’s viewpoint, it “…From an executive’s viewpoint, itcan be interpreted as the difference can be interpreted as the differencebetween the PR team being busy and between the PR team being busy andthe PR team being indispensable. the PR team being indispensable.Source: Dow Jones E-book: “Talk to me – 10 tips for translating the PR results into the language of business“. ©2010 Dow Jones & Company
  221. 221. Typical Output, Outtake and Outcome Metrics GOAL ACTION OUTPUT OUTTAKE OUTCOME (INPUT) METRIC METRIC METRIC has to answer Group Exercise: “So what?” Sales PlaceUse your exercise example requests for product # meetings % awareness of your # of Leads reviews # of speaking brand information Initiate(G20 / Qantas / % considering your speakers engagements SGX-ASX) program brand Proactive and define: your # of blog mentions # of reviews % preferring How do you want to share your blogger outreach # of media contacts made brand efforts and successes with the # of news releases sent board?Source: Using Public Relations Research to Drive Business Results, Institute for Public Relations ©2010 Dow Jones & Company

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