CerebellumBy: Mohammed Khatem
Makes up 11% of the brain’s mass
Cerebellum (“little brain”)—two smaller
hemispheres located at the lower back
of the brai...
The cerebellum is at the back of the brain,
below the cerebrum. It's a lot smaller than
the cerebrum at only 1/8 of its si...
It is located behind the brain stem
right at the bottom of the brain. It
has a large mass of cerebral cortex
above and a p...
Three fiber bundles called cerebellar peduncles connect
the cerebellum to the three parts of the brain stem—
the midbrain,...
The cerebellum coordinates
voluntary movements by fine-
tuning commands from the
motor cortex in the cerebrum.
The cerebel...
If there is any traumatic brain injury or brain cancer, the
function of cerebellum may go out of order. It causes slow
and...
Asynergia: This is loss of coordination of motor movement.
Dysmetria: The person finds it difficult to judge distance and
...
Books
Bell CC, Han V, Sawtell NB (2008). "Cerebellum-like
structures and their implications for cerebellar
function". Annu...
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Cerebellum

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Cerebellum

  1. 1. CerebellumBy: Mohammed Khatem
  2. 2. Makes up 11% of the brain’s mass Cerebellum (“little brain”)—two smaller hemispheres located at the lower back of the brain beneath the occipital lobes, which coordinates body movements. The outer layer, or cortex, of the cerebellum consists of fine folds called folia. As in the cerebrum, the outer layer of gray matter surrounds the structure. The Cerebellum
  3. 3. The cerebellum is at the back of the brain, below the cerebrum. It's a lot smaller than the cerebrum at only 1/8 of its size. Because of your cerebellum, you can stand upright, keep your balance, and move around. Think about a surfer riding the waves on his board. What does he need most to stay balanced? The best surfboard? The coolest wetsuit? Nope — he needs his cerebellum! The Cerebellum
  4. 4. It is located behind the brain stem right at the bottom of the brain. It has a large mass of cerebral cortex above and a portion of the brain stem. Cerebellum is divided into two hemisphere, and has a cortex that surrounds these hemispheres. The Cerebellum consists of two cerebellar hemisphere united in the midline by the vermis Location?
  5. 5. Three fiber bundles called cerebellar peduncles connect the cerebellum to the three parts of the brain stem— the midbrain, the pons, and the medulla oblongata. Three peduncles The Three Peduncles Inferior cerebellar peduncle •connect the cerebellum with medulla and the spinal cord Middle cerebellar peduncle •Connect the cerebellum with pons Superior cerebellar peduncle •Connect the cerebellum with midbrain
  6. 6. The cerebellum coordinates voluntary movements by fine- tuning commands from the motor cortex in the cerebrum. The cerebellum also maintains position and balance by controlling muscle tone and sensing the position of the limbs. All motor activity, from hitting a baseball to fingering a violin, depends on the cerebellum. Function?
  7. 7. If there is any traumatic brain injury or brain cancer, the function of cerebellum may go out of order. It causes slow and uncoordinated movements in the body. Therefore, people with cerebellum injuries sway and stagger while they walk. The damage to cerebellum may lead to many problems in an individual. What happens when the part doesn’t function properly?
  8. 8. Asynergia: This is loss of coordination of motor movement. Dysmetria: The person finds it difficult to judge distance and when to stop. Adiadochokinesia: This is a condition where the person is unable to perform rapid alternating movements. Intention tremor: The patient may tremor while carrying out certain movements. Ataxic gait: Staggering and swaying while walking. Hypotonia: A person develops weak muscles. Ataxic dysarthria: Development of slurred speech. Nystagmus: Abnormal eye movements. Cerebral Problems
  9. 9. Books Bell CC, Han V, Sawtell NB (2008). "Cerebellum-like structures and their implications for cerebellar function". Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 31: 1–24. Houk JC, Buckingham JT, Barto AG (1996). "Models of the cerebellum and motor learning". Behav. Brain Sci. 19 (3): 368–383. Websites http://www.wayfinding.net/cerebell.htm References

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