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Read with Pride | LGBTQ+ Reads

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Join Kayla as she discusses LGBTQ+ titles for all ages to include in your collections--including some new 2021 releases--as well as display and programming ideas to help you gear up for Pride month at your library.

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Read with Pride | LGBTQ+ Reads

  1. 1. READ WITH PRIDE KAYLA MARTIN-GANT CONTINUING EDUCATION COORDINATOR MISSISSIPPI LIBRARY COMMISSION LGBTQ+ READS & PROGRAMMING IDEAS
  2. 2. HELLO! I’m Kayla Martin-Gant. I’m the Continuing Education Coordinator for the Mississippi Library Commission. I’m also a former YA, reference, and genealogy librarian (though not all at once, thankfully).
  3. 3. PICTURE BOOKS
  4. 4. Whenever Ari's Uncle Lior comes to visit, they ask Ari one question: "What are your words? Some days Ari uses she/her. Other days Ari uses he/him. But on the day of the neighborhood's big summer bash, Ari doesn't know what words to use. On the way to the party, Ari and Lior meet lots of neighbors and learn the words each of them use to describe themselves, including pronouns like she/her, he/him, they/them, ey/em, and ze/zir. As Ari tries on different pronouns, they discover that it's okay to not know your words right away--sometimes you have to wait for your words to find you. May 2021 What Are Your Words? A Book About Pronouns by Katherine Locke Anne Passchier (Illustrator)
  5. 5. In this deeply moving and empowering true story, young readers will trace the life of the Gay Pride Flag, from its beginnings in 1978 with social activist Harvey Milk and designer Gilbert Baker to its spanning of the globe and its role in today’s world. Award-winning author Rob Sanders’s stirring text, and acclaimed illustrator Steven Salerno’s evocative images, combine to tell this remarkable—and undertold—story. A story of love, hope, equality, and pride. 2018 Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag by Rob Sanders Steven Salerno (Illustrator)
  6. 6. Casey loves to play with his blocks, puzzles, and dump truck, but he also loves things that sparkle, shimmer, and glitter. When his older sister, Jessie, shows off her new shimmery skirt, Casey wants to wear a shimmery skirt too. When Jessie comes home from a party with glittery nails, Casey wants glittery nails too. And when Abuelita visits wearing an armful of sparkly bracelets, Casey gets one to wear, just like Jessie. The adults in Casey's life embrace his interests, but Jessie isn't so sure. Boys aren't supposed to wear sparkly, glittery, shimmery things. Then, when older boys at the library tease Casey for wearing -girl- things, Jessie realizes that Casey has the right to be himself and wear whatever he wants. Why can't both she and Casey love all things shimmery, glittery, and sparkly? 2017 Sparkle Boy by Lesléa Newman Maria Mola (Illustrator)
  7. 7. Once upon a time, in a kingdom far from here, there was a prince in line to take the throne, so his parents set out to find him a kind and worthy bride. The three of them traveled the land far and wide, but the prince didn't quite find what he was looking for in the princesses they met. While they were away, a terrible dragon threatened their land, and all the soldiers fled. The prince rushed back to save his kingdom from the perilous beast and was met by a brave knight in a suit of brightly shining armor. Together they fought the dragon and discovered that special something the prince was looking for all along. 2018 Prince & Knight by Daniel Haack Stevia Lewis (Illustrator)
  8. 8. Once in a faraway kingdom, a strong, brave maiden is invited to attend the prince's royal ball…but she’s definitely not as excited to go as everyone else. After her mother convinces her to make an appearance, she makes a huge impression on everyone present, from the villagers to the king and queen. But she ends up finding true love in a most surprising place. 2019 Maiden & Princess by Daniel Haack & Isabel Galupo Becca Human (Illustrator)
  9. 9. Susan thinks her little sister Jackie has the best giggle! She can't wait for Jackie to get older so they can do all sorts of things like play forest fairies and be explorers together. But as Jackie grows, she doesn't want to play those games. She wants to play with mud and be a super bug! Jackie also doesn't like dresses or her long hair, and she would rather be called Jack. 2018 Jack (Not Jackie) by Erica Silverman Holly Hatam (Illustrator)
  10. 10. MIDDLE-GRADE BOOKS
  11. 11. Ana-Marie Jin, the reigning US Juvenile figure skating champion, is not a frilly dress kind of kid. So, when Ana learns next season's program will be princess themed, doubt forms fast. Once Ana meets Hayden, a transgender boy new to the rink, thoughts about the program and gender identity begin to take center stage. And when Hayden mistakes Ana for a boy, Ana doesn't correct him and finds comfort in this boyish identity when he's around. As their friendship develops, Ana realizes that it's tricky juggling two different identities on one slippery sheet of ice. And with a major competition approaching, Ana must decide whether telling everyone the truth is worth risking years of hard work and sacrifice. Ana on the Edge by A.J. Sass (2020)
  12. 12. Rick's never questioned much. He's gone along with his best friend Jeff even when Jeff's acted like a bully and a jerk. He's let his father joke with him about which hot girls he might want to date even though that kind of talk always makes him uncomfortable. And he hasn't given his own identity much thought, because everyone else around him seemed to have figured it out. But now Rick's gotten to middle school, and new doors are opening. One of them leads to the school's Rainbow Spectrum club, where kids of many genders and identities congregate, including Melissa, the girl who sits in front of Rick in class and seems to have her life together. Rick wants his own life to be that ... understood. Even if it means breaking some old friendships and making some new ones. Note: Check out this post from Alex Gino on how to talk about the title and character name. Rick by Alex Gino (2020)
  13. 13. Rahul Kapoor is heading into seventh grade in a small town in Indiana. The start of middle school is making him feel increasingly anxious, so his grandfather, gives him some well-meaning advice: Find one thing you’re really good at. And become the BEST at it. Those four little words sear themselves into Rahul’s brain. While he’s not quite sure what that special thing is, he is convinced that once he finds it, bullies like Brent will stop torturing him at school. And he won’t be worried about staring too long at his classmate Justin. With his best friend, Chelsea, by his side, Rahul is ready to crush this challenge. . . But what if he discovers he isn’t the best at anything? The Best At It by Maulik Pancholy (2019)
  14. 14. When a tornado rips through town, twelve-year-old Ivy Aberdeen's house is destroyed and her family of five is displaced. Ivy feels invisible and ignored in the aftermath of the storm--and worse, her notebook filled with secret drawings of girls holding hands has gone missing. Mysteriously, Ivy's drawings begin to reappear in her locker with notes from someone telling her to open up about her identity. Ivy thinks--and hopes--that this someone might be her classmate, another girl for whom Ivy has begun to develop a crush. Will Ivy find the strength and courage to follow her true feelings? Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World by Ashley Herring Blake (2018)
  15. 15. Melly only joined the school band because her best friend, Olivia, begged her to. But to her surprise, quiet Melly loves playing the drums. It’s the only time she doesn’t feel like a mouse. Now, she and Olivia are about to spend the next two weeks at Camp Rockaway, jamming under the stars in the Michigan woods. But this summer brings big changes for Melly: her parents split up, her best friend ditches her, and Melly finds herself falling for a girl at camp named Adeline. To top it off, Melly's not sure she has what it takes to be a real rock 'n' roll drummer. Will she be able to make music from all the noise in her heart? Drum Roll, Please by Lisa Jenn Bigelow (2018)
  16. 16. Jeremiah wants a normal summer with his dad, who just moved into an apartment with his new boyfriend, Michael. It’s soon clear that his dad is getting closer to Michael’s group of friends, which would be great if it wasn’t making Jeremiah feel invisible. Fortunately, there’s Sage, the only other kid in their hipster neighborhood. Although Sage is quirky, their friendship is cemented at the Pride festival when Jeremiah finds out Sage has two moms. Two moms –like he might have two dads if he doesn’t put a stop to Michael. Enter Mr. Keeler, the grouchy old smoker downstairs who has an ongoing feud with Michael. It's looking like this is going to be a long summer. Second Dad Summer by Benjamin Klas (2020)
  17. 17. Zenobia July is starting a new life in Maine. She used to spend most of her time behind a computer screen, but now she's coming out of her shell and discovering a community of friends. People used to tell her she was a boy; now she's able to live openly as the girl she always knew she was. When someone anonymously posts hateful memes on her school's website, Zenobia knows she's the one with the abilities to solve the mystery, all while wrestling with the challenges of a new school, a new family, and coming to grips with presenting her true gender for the first time. Timely and touching, Zenobia July is, at its heart, a story about finding home. Zenobia July by Lisa Bunker (2019)
  18. 18. Hurricane Child by Kacen Callender (2018) Being born during a hurricane is unlucky, and Caroline has had her share of bad luck lately. She's hated and bullied, a spirit only she can see won't stop following her, and—worst of all—Caroline's mother left home and never came back. But when a new student named Kalinda arrives, Caroline's luck begins to turn around. Kalinda, a solemn girl with a special smile for everyone, becomes Caroline’s only friend— and her crush. Caroline must find the strength to confront her feelings for Kalinda, brave the spirit stalking her through the islands, and face the reason her mother abandoned her. Together, Caroline and Kalinda must set out in a hurricane to find Caroline's mother—before Caroline loses her forever.
  19. 19. Too Bright to See by Kyle Lukoff (April 2021) It's the summer before middle school and eleven-year-old Bug's best friend Moira has decided the two of them need to use the next few months to prepare. Except Bug doesn’t want to spend time trying to understand how to be a girl. Besides, there's something more important to worry about: A ghost is haunting Bug's eerie old house in rural Vermont... and maybe haunting Bug in particular. As Bug begins to untangle the mystery of who this ghost is and what they're trying to say, an altogether different truth comes to light--Bug is transgender.
  20. 20. Hazel Bly and the Deep Blue Sea by Ashley Herring Blake (May 2021) After her Mum's death, Hazel, her other mother and her little sister, Peach, have lived all over the country, never settling anywhere for more than a few months. When the family arrives in Rose Harbor, Maine, there’s a wildness to the small town that feels like magic. Then Mama runs into an old childhood friend, with a daughter named Lemon, who can't stop rambling on about the Rose Maid, a 150-year-old mermaid myth. Soon, Hazel finds herself just as obsessed with the Rose Maid—because what if magic were real? Can grief really change you so much you aren’t even yourself anymore?
  21. 21. Thanks A Lot, Universe by Chad Lucas (May 2021) Brian has always been anxious. His dad tries to get him to stand up for himself and his mom helps as much as she can, but after he and his brother are placed in foster care, Brian starts having panic attacks. And he doesn’t know if things will ever be “normal” again. Ezra’s always been popular. He’s friends with most of the kids on his basketball team—even Brian, who usually keeps to himself. But now, some of his friends have been acting differently, and Brian seems to be pulling away. Ezra wants to help, but he worries if he’s too nice to Brian, his friends will realize that he has a crush on him. But when Brian and his brother run away, Ezra has no choice but to take the leap and reach out. Both boys have to decide if they’re willing to risk sharing parts of themselves they’d rather hide. But if they can be brave, they might find the best in themselves—and each other.
  22. 22. Flight of the Puffin by Ann Braden (May 2021) Libby comes from a long line of bullies. She wants to be different, but sometimes that doesn’t work out. Now she's suspended again. On the opposite side of the country lives Vincent, who’s trying hard not to get stuffed into lockers at his new school. But that’s not working out too well either. Nearby is T, who couldn’t take living at home anymore and ran away. And then there’s Jack, a big-hearted kid so engaged in the fight to keep his small rural school open that he’s lost focus on the ones who need him most. Four kids. Four different lives…and then one card with a message of hope, helping each kid summon the thing they need. But best of all, it makes each one realize they matter—and that they're not flying solo anymore.
  23. 23. YOUNG ADULT BOOKS
  24. 24. Yadriel has summoned a ghost. Now he can't get rid of him. When his traditional Latinx family has problems accepting his true gender, Yadriel becomes determined to prove himself a real brujo. With the help of his cousin and best friend Maritza, he performs the ritual himself, and then sets out to find the ghost of his murdered cousin and set it free. However, the ghost he summons is actually Julian Diaz, the school's resident bad boy, and he’s not about to go quietly into death. He's determined to figure out what happened and tie off some loose ends before he leaves. Left with no choice, Yadriel agrees to help Julian, so that they can both get what they want. But the longer Yadriel spends with Julian, the less he wants to let him leave. Cemetery Boys by Aiden Thomas (2020)
  25. 25. Liz has always believed she's too black, too poor, too awkward to shine in her small, rich, prom-obsessed midwestern town. But it's okay -- Liz has a plan that will get her out of Indiana, forever: attend the uber-elite Pennington College, play in their world-famous orchestra, and become a doctor. But when the financial aid she was counting on unexpectedly falls through, Liz's plans come crashing down…until she's reminded of her school's scholarship for prom king and queen. Despite her fear of the spotlight she's willing to do whatever it takes to get to Pennington. The only thing that makes it halfway bearable is the new girl in school, Mack. She's smart, funny, and just as much of an outsider as Liz. But Mack is also in the running for queen. Will falling for the competition keep Liz from her dreams . . . or make them come true? You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson (2020)
  26. 26. A stirring, bold, and moving anthology of stories and poetry by top LGBTQ+ YA authors as well as brand new talent, giving their unique responses to the broad theme of pride. Each story features an illustration by an artist who identies as part of the LGBTQ+ community. Compiled by Juno Dawson, author of THIS BOOK IS GAY and CLEAN. PROUD Edited by Juno Dawson (2019)
  27. 27. After losing spectacularly to her ex-girlfriend in their first game since their breakup, Scottie Zajac gets into a fender bender with the worst possible person: her nemesis, the incredibly beautiful and incredibly mean Irene Abraham. Things only get worse when their nosey moms get involved and the girls are forced to carpool together until Irene’s car gets out of the shop. Their bumpy start only gets bumpier the more time they spend together. But when an opportunity presents itself for Scottie to get back at her toxic ex (and climb her school’s social ladder at the same time), she bribes Irene into playing along. Hijinks, heartbreak, and a fake-dating scheme for the ages! She Drives Me Crazy by Kelly Quindlen (April 2021)
  28. 28. When Liam Cooper's older brother Ethan is killed in a hit-and-run, Liam has to not only learn to face the world without one of the people he loved the most, but also face the fading relationship with his two best friends. Feeling more alone and isolated than ever, Liam finds themself sharing time with Marcus, Ethan's best friend, and through Marcus, Liam finds the one person that seems to know exactly what they're going through, for the better, and the worse. This book is about grief. But it's also about why we live. Why we have to keep moving on, and why we should. The Ghosts We Keep by Mason Deaver (June 2021)
  29. 29. Emma is a die-hard romantic. She loves a meet-cute Netflix movie, her pet, Lady Catulet, and dreaming up the Gay Rom Com of her heart for the film festival competition she and her friends are entering. If only they’d listen to her ideas. Sophia is pragmatic. She’s big into boycotts, namely 1) relationships, 2) teen boys, and 3) Emma’s nauseating ideas. Forget starry-eyed romance, Sophia knows what will win: an artistic film with a message. Cue the drama. The movie is doomed before they even start shooting . . . until a real-life plot twist unfolds behind the camera when Emma and Sophia start seeing each other through a different lens. Suddenly their rivalry is starting to feel like an actual rom-com. . I Think I Love You by Auriane Desombre (March 2021)
  30. 30. On Wendy Darling’s first night in Chicago, a boy called Peter appears at her window. He’s dizzying, captivating, and beautiful… so she agrees to join him for a night on the town. Wendy thinks they’re heading to a party, but instead they’re soon running in the city’s underground. She makes friends—a punk girl named Tinkerbelle and the lost boys Peter watches over. And she makes enemies— the terrifying Detective Hook, and maybe Peter himself, as his sinister secrets start coming to light. Can Wendy find the courage to survive this night—and make sure everyone else does, too? . Darling by K. Ancrum (June 2021)
  31. 31. Jake Livingston is one of the only Black kids at St. Clair Prep, one of the others being his infinitely more popular older brother. It’s hard enough fitting in but to make matters worse and more complicated, Jake can see the dead. In fact, he sees the dead around him all the time. Most are harmless. Stuck in their death loops as they relive their deaths over and over again, they don’t interact often with people. But then Jake meets Sawyer, a troubled teen who shot and killed six kids at a local high school last year before taking his own life. Now a powerful, vengeful ghost, he has plans for his afterlife–plans that include Jake. Suddenly, everything Jake knows about ghosts and the rules to life itself go out the window as Sawyer begins haunting him and bodies turn up in his neighborhood. High school soon becomes a survival game–one Jake is not sure he’s going to win.. The Taking of Jake Livingston by Ryan Douglass (July 2021)
  32. 32. Jeremy Harkiss, cheer captain and student body president, won’t let coming out as a transgender boy ruin his senior year. Instead of bowing to the bigots and outdated school administration, Jeremy decides to make some noise—and how better than by challenging his all-star ex-boyfriend, Lukas, for the title of Homecoming King? Lukas Rivers, football star and head of the Homecoming Committee, is just trying to find order in his life after his older brother’s funeral and the loss long-term girlfriend— who turned out to be a boy. But when Jeremy threatens to steal his crown, Lukas kick starts a plot to sabotage Jeremy’s campaign. When both boys take their rivalry too far, the dance is on the verge of being canceled. To save Homecoming, they’ll have to face the hurt they’re both hiding—and the lingering butterflies they can’t deny. May the Best Man Win by Z.R. Ellor (May 2021)
  33. 33. Eleanor Zarrin has been estranged from her family for years. When she flees boarding school after a horrifying incident, she goes to the only place she thinks is safe: the home she left behind. But she struggles to fit in with her monstrous relatives, who prowl the woods around the family estate and read fortunes in the guts of birds. Eleanor finds herself desperately trying to hold the family together — in order to save them all, Eleanor must learn to embrace her family of monsters and tame the darkness inside her. What Big Teeth by Rose Szabo (February 2021)
  34. 34. ADULT BOOKS
  35. 35. Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir (2019) The Emperor needs necromancers. The Ninth Necromancer needs a swordswoman. Gideon has a sword, some dirty magazines, and no more time for undead nonsense. She’s ready to abandon a life of servitude and an afterlife as a reanimated corpse, but her childhood nemesis won't set her free without a service. Harrowhark Nonagesimus, Reverend Daughter of the Ninth House and bone witch extraordinaire, has been summoned into action. The Emperor has invited the heirs to each of his loyal Houses to a deadly trial of wits and skill. If Harrowhark succeeds, she’ll become an immortal, all-powerful servant of the Resurrection . . . but no necromancer can ascend without their cavalier. Without Gideon's sword, Harrow will fail, and the Ninth House will die. Of course, some things are better left dead.
  36. 36. The Binding by Bridget Collins (2019) Books are dangerous things in this world, a place vaguely reminiscent of 19th-century England. People visit book binders to rid themselves of painful or treacherous memories. Once their stories have been told and bound between the pages of a book, the slate is wiped clean, and their memories lose the power to hurt or haunt them. After having suffered some sort of mental collapse, Emmett Farmer is sent to the workshop of one such binder to live and work as her apprentice. Leaving behind home and family, Emmett slowly regains his health while learning the binding trade. He is forbidden to enter the locked room where books are stored, so he spends many months marbling end pages, tooling leather book covers, and gilding edges. But his curiosity is piqued by the people who come and go from the inner sanctum, and the arrival of the lordly Lucian Darnay, with whom he senses a connection, changes everything.
  37. 37. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune (2020) Linus Baker leads a quiet, solitary life. At forty, he lives in a tiny house with a devious cat and his old records. As a Case Worker at the Department in Charge Of Magical Youth, he spends his days overseeing the well-being of children in government-sanctioned orphanages. Summoned suddenly by Extremely Upper Management, Linus is given a curious and highly classified assignment: travel to Marsyas Island Orphanage, where six dangerous children reside. Linus must set aside his fears and determine whether or not they’re likely to bring about the end of days. But the children aren’t the only secret the island keeps. Their caretaker is the charming, enigmatic Arthur Parnassus, who will do anything to keep his wards safe. As Arthur and Linus grow closer, long-held secrets are exposed, and Linus must make a choice: destroy a home or watch the world burn.
  38. 38. This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone (2019) In the ashes of a dying world, an agent of the Commandant finds a letter. It reads: Burn before reading. Thus begins an unlikely correspondence between two rival agents hellbent on securing the best possible future for their warring factions. Now, what began as a taunt, a battlefield boast, grows into something more. Something epic. Something romantic. Something that could change the past and the future. Except the discovery of their bond would mean death for each of them. There's still a war going on, after all. And someone has to win that war.
  39. 39. Lone Stars by Justin Deabler (February 2021) Julian Warner, a father at last, wrestles with a question his husband posed: what will you tell our son about the people you came from, now that they're gone? Finding the answers takes Julian back in time…from the Eisenhower administration’s immigration border raids, an epistolary love affair during the Vietnam War, crumbling marriages, queer migrations to Cambridge and New York, all the way up to the disorienting polarization of Obama's second term. In these answers, there lies a hope: that by uncloseting ourselves—as immigrants, smart women, gay people— we can find power in empathy.
  40. 40. Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers (February 2021) Grace is a straight A, work-through-the-summer certified high achiever. She is not the kind of person who goes to Vegas and gets drunkenly married to a woman whose name she doesn’t know…until she does exactly that. This one moment of departure from her stern ex-military father’s plans for her life has Grace wondering why she doesn’t feel more fulfilled from completing her degree. Staggering under the weight of her father’s expectations, a struggling job market and feelings of burnout, Grace flees with the wife she barely knows…and falls hard for her creative and beautiful wife, Yuki Yamamoto. But when reality comes crashing in, Grace must face what she’s been running from all along—the fears that make us human, the family scars that need to heal and the longing for connection, especially when navigating the messiness of adulthood.
  41. 41. Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell (February 2021) While the Iskat Empire has long dominated the system through treaties and political alliances, several planets, including Thea, have begun to chafe under Iskat's rule. When tragedy befalls Imperial Prince Taam, his Thean widower, Jainan, is rushed into an arranged marriage with Taam's cousin, the disreputable Kiem, in a bid to keep the rising hostilities between the two worlds under control. But when it comes to light that Prince Taam's death may not have been an accident, and that Jainan himself may be a suspect, the unlikely pair must overcome their misgivings and learn to trust one another as they navigate the perils of the Iskat court, try to solve a murder, and prevent an interplanetary war... all while dealing with their growing feelings for each other.
  42. 42. One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston (June 2021) For cynical twenty-three-year-old August, moving to New York City is supposed to prove her right: that things like magic and cinematic love stories don't exist, and the only smart way to go through life is alone. And there's certainly no chance of her subway commute being anything more than a daily trudge through boredom and electrical failures. But then, there's this gorgeous girl on the train. Jane. Dazzling, charming, mysterious, impossible Jane. Jane with her rough edges and soft smile, showing up in a leather jacket to save August's day when she needed it most. August's subway crush becomes the best part of her day, but pretty soon, she discovers there's one big problem: Jane doesn't just look like an old school punk rocker. She's literally displaced in time from the 1970s, and August is going to have to use everything she tried to leave in her own past to help her.
  43. 43. NONFICTION BOOKS
  44. 44. As a nonbinary, transmasculine parent, Krys Malcolm Belc has thought a lot about the interplay between parenthood and gender. Giving birth to his son clarified his gender identity and allowed him to project a more masculine self. And yet, when his partner Anna adopted Samson, the legal documents listed Belc as “the natural mother of the child.” By considering how the experiences contained under the umbrella of “motherhood” don’t fully align with Belc’s own experience, this memoir journeys both toward and through common perceptions of what it means to have a body and how that body can influence the perception of a family. The Natural Mother of the Child by Krys Malcolm Belc (June 2021)
  45. 45. In a series of personal essays, prominent journalist and activist George M. Johnson explores his childhood, adolescence, and college years in New Jersey and Virginia. From the memories of getting his teeth kicked out by bullies at age five, to flea marketing with his loving grandmother, to his first sexual relationships, this young-adult memoir weaves together the trials and triumphs faced by Black queer boys. This memoir is both a primer for teens eager to be allies as well as a reassuring testimony for young queer men of color, and covers topics such as gender identity, toxic masculinity, brotherhood, family, structural marginalization, consent, and Black joy. Johnson's emotionally frank style of writing will appeal directly to young adults. All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson (2020)
  46. 46. History sounds really official. Like it's all fact. Like it's definitely what happened. But that's not necessarily true. History was crafted by the people who recorded it. And sometimes, those historians were biased against, didn't see, or couldn't even imagine anyone different from themselves. That means that history has often left out the stories of LGBTQIA+ people: men who loved men, women who loved women, people who loved without regard to gender, and people who lived outside gender boundaries. Historians have even censored the lives and loves of some of the world's most famous people, from William Shakespeare and Pharaoh Hatshepsut to Eleanor Roosevelt. No Way, They Were Gay? Hidden Lives and Secret Loves by Lee Wind (April 2021)
  47. 47. Why has music so often served as an accomplice to transcendent expressions of gender? Why did the query "is he musical?" become code, in the twentieth century, for "is he gay?“ Why is music so inherently queer? For Sasha Geffen, the answers lie, in part, in music's intrinsic quality of subliminal expression which allows rigid gender roles to fall away in a sensual, ambiguous exchange between performer and listener. Glitter Up the Dark traces the history of this gender fluidity in pop music from the early 20th century to the present day. Glitter Up the Dark: How Pop Music Broke the Binary by Sasha Geffen (2020)
  48. 48. GRAPHIC NOVELS
  49. 49. SERIES
  50. 50. STAND ALONE
  51. 51. NONFICTION
  52. 52. NONFICTION
  53. 53. PROGRAM IDEAS
  54. 54. BADGES & PINS ∎ Canva tutorial + design session ∎ Hand-drawn/created or printed ∎ Don’t have a button-maker? Check with your local library commission or invest in one of your own—they’re good for other library programs, too! Pins with pronouns + flag colors are from PricklyCactusCollage on Etsy
  55. 55. BRACELETS ∎ Use a variety of colors for different genders and orientations, or make a full rainbow ∎ Great as a take-and- make project, too. ∎ Get the how-to link at Two of Wands here
  56. 56. SPEAKERS ∎ Q&A with teens + queer community leaders/organizations ∎ Programming for parents, grandparents, guardians, teachers, etc. who want to learn more about the LGBTQ+ community but feel a bit adrift ∎ LGBTQ+ history panels/discussions
  57. 57. OTHER IDEAS ∎ Melted Crayon art projects: easily adapted for different age groups (and with younger kids you can tie in picture books that utilize the colors-as-identities metaphor) and ability levels, generally cheap, easy, and fun. ∎ Poster contests for LGBTQ+ media: throw in different elements like a minimalist requirement or done in specific colors for an extra spin. ∎ Create Your Own Playlist projects: Great for multiple age groups, but teens often LOVE this kind of program. They can create playlists based on their own experiences, general pride-themed playlists, or even playlists for their favorite queer characters, relationships, or stories. They can share them with one another, create album art, etc.
  58. 58. DISPLAY IDEAS
  59. 59. ELEMENTS & THEMES ∎ Pennant banners, pride flags, and streamers make for easy, cheap, and/or DIY decorations no matter the area dimensions you’re working with. ∎ Be sure to include audiobooks, DVDs, graphic novels, and large type books in your displays whenever possible. ∎ Create a Pride-themed playlist on YouTube and use a QR code to link people. If your library has a Spotify account, you can have a collaborative playlist, too. ∎ Create a digital display that includes LGBTQ+ history videos, music videos from famous queer musicians, an art gallery featuring queer artists, and interesting articles, essays, and other ephemera from around the internet. ∎ For more ideas or tips on how to find this stuff, feel free to contact me!
  60. 60. RESOURCES ∎ LGBTQ Reads ∎ YA Pride ∎ Queer Books for Teens ∎ My LGBTQ+ RA board on Pinterest ∎ Book Riot
  61. 61. THANKS! Any questions? You can find me at kmartin-gant@mlc.lib.ms.us or call me at 601.432.4057
  62. 62. CREDITS Special thanks to all the people who made and released these awesome resources for free: ∎ Presentation template by SlidesCarnival ∎ Photographs by Unsplash

Join Kayla as she discusses LGBTQ+ titles for all ages to include in your collections--including some new 2021 releases--as well as display and programming ideas to help you gear up for Pride month at your library.

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