English Colonies of North America<br />By: Kasandra Bartels<br />History 140<br />
Most New England families sought out independency, being realistic and diligent they figured that if they owned enough lan...
New England economy portioned its rewards more equally among their farmers and tradesmen compared to the colonists in Ches...
The orthodox New English maintained that they had a divine mission to create a model society in the Americas. With the str...
The Carolina’s leaders believed that they must recruit Indians to be slave catchers by offering guns and ammunition as an ...
Far from undermining colonial security, the gun trade rendered the natives dependent upon weapons that they could neither ...
Carolina became cattle country in the English empire, as the Carolinians pioneered many practices later perfected on a gra...
During the early 17th century, the English developed two distinct and populous clusters of settlements along the Atlantic ...
At mid-century, as the English grew in power and ambition, their rulers developed a violent envy of Dutch wealth. King Cha...
The English grew in power and ambition, their rulers developed a violent envy of Dutch wealth. King Charles II and his bro...
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English colonies of north america

  1. 1. English Colonies of North America<br />By: Kasandra Bartels<br />History 140<br />
  2. 2. Most New England families sought out independency, being realistic and diligent they figured that if they owned enough land, farm or shop to support a family, then they wouldn’t have to work under anyone.<br />Competency meant a sufficiency, but not a surplus of goods, providing enough to eat, simple clothing, a roof over their heads and education for their children. New England provided many independent farms and families.<br />Chapter 8: New England<br />
  3. 3. New England economy portioned its rewards more equally among their farmers and tradesmen compared to the colonists in Chesapeake. However, the Englishmen produced less wealth than the plantations in Chesapeake.<br />Royalists despised the New England region because they had the most decentralized and popularly responsive form of government among all of the English empires. The Royalists called this republicanism.<br />Chapter 8: New England<br />
  4. 4. The orthodox New English maintained that they had a divine mission to create a model society in the Americas. With the struggle between God’s will and Satan’s wiles, New England became the backbone for all the eternal fate of mankind. Puritans would never doubt the power of God, they also knew that Satan played a big role in the makings of a society. That there had to be some form of balance between the two.<br />A belief in magic and witches made perfect sense to these people who oftentimes felt vulnerable to the unpredictable natural world beyond anyones control.<br />Chapter 8: New England<br />
  5. 5. The Carolina’s leaders believed that they must recruit Indians to be slave catchers by offering guns and ammunition as an incentive to perform such an act.<br />To afford these weapons, the natives raided other Indians for captives to sell as slaves, or they could track and return the runaway slaves.<br />Chapter 11: Carolina<br />
  6. 6. Far from undermining colonial security, the gun trade rendered the natives dependent upon weapons that they could neither make or repair. If deprived of ammunition, the natives would suffer in their hunting and fall prey to slave-raiding by better-armed Indians more favored by their colonial supplier. <br />Chapter 11: Carolina<br />
  7. 7. Carolina became cattle country in the English empire, as the Carolinians pioneered many practices later perfected on a grand scale in the American West, including cattle branding, annual roundups, cow pens and cattle drives from the interior to the market in Charles Town. <br />Many owners entrusted the roaming cattle to the care of black slaves, who had previous experience as herdsmen in Africa. <br />In Carolina the black herdsmen became known as 'cowboys - apparently the origin of that famous term.<br />Chapter 11: Carolina<br />
  8. 8. During the early 17th century, the English developed two distinct and populous clusters of settlements along the Atlantic seaboard. Until mid-century, the English neglected the intervening mid-Atlantic coast, despite its advantages. More fertile and temperate than New England, but far healthier than the Chesapeake, the mid-Atlantic region was especially promising for cultivating grain, raising livestock and reproducing people.<br />The English neglect enabled the Dutch and Swedes to establish their own small colonies: New Netherland in the Hudson Valley and New Sweden in the Delaware Valley. Although the English protested, they initially lacked the power to oust their rivals, and deemed it impolitic to try, for the Dutch and Swedes were fellow Protestants and allies in the European wars of religion during the early 17th century. <br />Chapter 12: Middle Colonies<br />
  9. 9. At mid-century, as the English grew in power and ambition, their rulers developed a violent envy of Dutch wealth. King Charles II and his brother James, the Duke of York, hoped expand the empire in America. By conquering New Netherland, Charles and James meant to strengthen England's commerce by weakening its principal rival, the Dutch empire. <br />The acquisition of New Netherland would also close the gap between the Chesapeake and New England, promoting mutual defense against other empires and the Indians. <br />Chapter 12: Middle Colonies<br />
  10. 10. The English grew in power and ambition, their rulers developed a violent envy of Dutch wealth. King Charles II and his brother James.<br />A conquest also promised increased crown control over its fractious colonies. Compared with the Spanish, French and Dutch rulers, the English monarch exercised little power over his colonists, primarily because of the persistent reliance on a proprietary system of colonization. During the early 17th century, the underfunded English crown had lacked the means to launch and administer distant colonies. Instead the crown entrusted early colonization to private interests licensed by royal charters, which awarded the proprietors both title to colonial land and the right to govern the colonists, subject to royal oversight. <br />Chapter 12: Middle Colonies<br />

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