Cities of the future - Jan Sturesson

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Cities of the future - Jan Sturesson

  1. 1. www.pwc.com Cities of... - Opportunity... - Tomorrow ... - the Future... Global Challange 2012 05 30Jan SturessonGlobal Leader Government and Public ServicesPartner
  2. 2. IntroductionPwC 2
  3. 3. PwC - Thought Leadership - Cities
  4. 4. COGNITIVE LANDSCAPEII Simpósio Internacional PwC - Inovação em Gestão Pública
  5. 5. Är vi en intelligent eller ignorant stad? The Ignorance Meter Ignorance High ignorance/ Low Ignorance/ Intelligence Low intelligence High Intelligence Autism 1 7 Openness Blindness 1 7 Vision Followership 1 7 Leadership Disintegration 1 7 Cohesion Vanity 1 7 Self-Reflection Abuse of IC 1 7 Use of IC Regression 1 7 Learning Disruption 1 7 Connectivity Lethargy 1 7 Initiative No-risk 1 7 ExperimentationII Simpósio Internacional PwC - Inovação em Gestão Pública Source. K.North
  6. 6. Vision ”Creating the Society of the Future for the Citizens of Tomorrow - Today – together with a more Trusted, Sustainable and Collaborating Government! 6
  7. 7. ?
  8. 8. It is all about cities….or…. “There is no question that cities are the engines ofeconomic growth and centres of dynamic social and cultural activities and development, although thereexist some contrary messages like the future lies in a living country side….” John Naisbitt Author and Futurist, USA
  9. 9. Visionsförverkligande - LandsbygdSeminarium Region Skåne 2009 01 22 Jan Sturesson Slide 9
  10. 10. Maps…PwC 10
  11. 11. Global Distribution of PopulationSource: The Rise of the Mega-Region RichardFlorida, Tim Gulden & Charlotta Mellander
  12. 12. Global distribution of Economic Activity (LRP)Source: The Rise of the Mega-Region RichardFlorida, Tim Gulden & Charlotta Mellander
  13. 13. Global distribution of patent activitySource: The Rise of the Mega-Region RichardFlorida, Tim Gulden & Charlotta Mellander
  14. 14. Global distribution of star scientists (highly cited science authors)Source: The Rise of the Mega-Region RichardFlorida, Tim Gulden & Charlotta Mellander
  15. 15. PerspectivePwC 15
  16. 16. Future of Future Cities !“The future is not as it used to be – we need energizing visions,personal leadership and passion to be able to imagine possiblefutures to accomplish the mission of reinventing future cities” From mega to meta - bigger and bigger… The urban meets the rural –thought high speed transport and internet Green, solar, wind etc. integrated Without - or much less – cars... Strategic business insourcing and citizen crowd sourcing Social intelligence 2.0 – Local leverage on global mega trends * 3
  17. 17. Future of Future Cities !! The future is not as it used to be – we need energizing visions, personal leadership and passion to be able to imagine possible futures to accomplish the mission of reinventing future cities  Stakeholder Collaboration - cross sectors – The new core business for city management  Holistic approach to sustainability – The “New Capitalism” …  Opened citizen participation and digital mass collaboration - through legitimate leadership  Reinventing the power of innovation and prototyping - big is beautiful, but in small scale… 3
  18. 18. The agenda of today and tomorrow… Competitiveness Attractiveness Sustainable Balanced Development Brand defining Growth Citizen Effective Engagement Service
  19. 19. A City Government Staircase The vision of future well fare and growth to the Future… External control”New Core Business” – Brand, CollaborationMagnetism, Excitement, Attractiveness Experiences for growth and well fare. AttractivenessBlue Ocean – New Business Logic Innovation Tomorrow Brand development Opportunity focus Citizen Consultation Yesterday Communication Streets, water ”Old Core Business” – taken for granted… Social care Red Ocean – traditional business logic. Internal control Risk Focus
  20. 20. TrendsPwC 20
  21. 21. Mega trends - effecting the strategic agenda !• Uncertainty – the new normal – financial crisis, epidemics, catastrophes and terrorism• Globalization and localization  Glocalisation*• Competition & Collaboration  Co-opetition*• Territoryzation and flow• Merging and fusion - territories and spheres melting together• Urbanization (Urban corridors)• Individualization• Governmentization and Privatization• Hi-tech (www, E-government)• Hi-touch (Experience society)
  22. 22. Mega trends - effecting the strategic agenda !!• Hi-tech (www, E-government)• Hi-touch (Experience society)• Peak oil and renewable energy• Water – the new oil• Mobility & Connectivity• Transparency and openness• Acceleration and time effectiveness – distance in minutes• Integration – living, working, shopping and leisure• Migration / segregation / integration (people, money, knowledge and values)• Demographic changes and ageing
  23. 23. Some Global Mega, Giga or TeraTrends… Globalization  Glocalization Financial / Economic crisis  debt, deficit, economies under pressure Urbanization Corridors, Urbanomics, territoryzation, rurbanization, “smartcitieszation” Competition  Co-opetition Amalgamation (spheres of society, industries, etc.) New Technologies ICT, E mobility, smart grids etc. Knowledge & experience society Individualization / personalization Climate change / sustainability  sustsinagility Demographic changes  aging - the silver potentials… 23
  24. 24. The Future is different… The new normal2.0 Collaborating Society Global The Local club Innovation Team • Uncertainty •Glocal-ization Local • Co-opetition GlobalApproach •Ra-plexity Approach The Local fight Everybody goes global by themselves Competing Society
  25. 25. Some Global Mega, Giga or TeraTrends… Globalization  Glocalization Financial / Economic crisis  debt, deficit, economies under pressure Urbanization Corridors, Urbanomics, territoryzation, rurbanization, “smartcitieszation” Competition  Co-opetition Amalgamation (spheres of society, industries, etc.) New Technologies ICT, E mobility, smart grids etc. Knowledge & experience society Individualization / personalization Climate change / sustainability  sustsinagility Demographic changes  aging - the silver potentials… 25
  26. 26. Economic PerspectiveE7 could overtake G7 by 2020 60000 By 2030, the global Convergence Catch-Up Overtaking GDP rankings (at 50000 PPPs) could read as follows:GDP at PPPs (constant 2008 I$) 40000 1. China 2. US 30000 3. India 4. Japan 20000 5. Brazil 6. Russia 10000 7. Germany G7 GDP E7 GDP 8. Mexico 0 9. France 10. UK Source: World Bank for 2000-8, PwC projections of actual GDP in 2009-10 and trend GDP thereafter E7 includes China, India, Brazil, Russia, Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey (the seven largest emerging economies). 28
  27. 27. Some Global Mega, Giga or TeraTrends… Globalization  Glocalization Financial / Economic crisis  debt, deficit, economies under pressure Urbanization Corridors, Urbanomics, territoryzation, rurbanization, “smartcitieszation” Competition  Co-opetition Amalgamation (spheres of society, industries, etc.) New Technologies ICT, E mobility, smart grids etc. Knowledge & experience society Individualization / personalization Climate change / sustainability  sustsinagility Demographic changes  aging - the silver potentials… 29
  28. 28. Leverage on current trends and integrate strategy and operations in our value prop Territory Transforming a territory (a city or a nation) for growth and development cross sectors Transform through Strategic Internal Implementation External Prototyping Developing wealth and well fare - effective processes and efficient service Organization
  29. 29. Understanding the Smart Communities concept ina comprehensive and holistic manner • eGovernment • Education • Data centers • Small & Medium • Broadband Intellectual Enterprises • Wireless ICT & Innovation • Human Development • E Payments • Digital economy • Urban planning • Conventional & • Health Renewable Energy • Safety & Security Social Infrastructure • Smart grids • Social integration & cohesion Smart • Transportation • Water Communities • Buildings/Housing • Tourism • Lighting • Leisure venues management Culture & Environmental • Solid Waste • Cultural venues Leisure management management Political • Water Waste Participation management • Citizen consultation & • Air quality participation management • Government outreach • Green areasPwC 31
  30. 30. Det bästa från två världar…Action, puls, täthet, ljud och ljus… Relax, utrymme, stjärnljus, mörker och tystnad… Slide 32
  31. 31. Samhällsentreprenör i Teckomatorp Samhällsentreprenörer i TeckomatorpSeminarium Region Skåne 2009 01 22 Jan Sturesson Slide 33
  32. 32. Future of Future Cities !! The future is not as it used to be – we need energizing visions, personal leadership and passion to be able to imagine possible futures to accomplish the mission of reinventing future cities  Stakeholder Collaboration - cross sectors – The new core business for city management  Holistic approach to sustainability – The “New Capitalism” …  Opened citizen participation and digital mass collaboration - through legitimate leadership  Reinventing the power of innovation and prototyping - big is beautiful, but in small scale… 3
  33. 33. Creating a new playground for growth -stakeholder collaboration
  34. 34. Holistic approach to sustainability – The“New Capitalism”
  35. 35. The New Value Matrix for SocietalInnovation – Opportunity Space Opportunity space…
  36. 36. Structure of PwC Cities Assessment Tool Strategic Vision Ambition Social Leadership City Brand City finance IntelligenceEnablers Management Prioritisation Capacity Programme/ Performance Partnerships Project & Risk Environmental Social capital Culture and leisure capital capital Capital policy and management Sustainable Local Economy Intellectual Participation and capital political capital Infrastructure ICT capital capitalDelivery and Achievement  Performance & A City of Results KPIs the Future
  37. 37. Methodology - Facing the urban challenge How do we create a How do we guarantuee sense of community? a sustainable level of welfare? Social Capital How do we utilise all of Welfare capital the human potential? Do we have an attractive brand Human - orfor global visitors? intellectual capital Tourist and Do we have the visitors capital infrastructure in place to support growth? Infrastructure capital Financial capital Are we financially Environmental and sustainable? natural resources Trade and capital industry capital & immigration Which policies Political and citizen How do we manage our should we adopt Culture and participation capital resources in a to drive economic growth? experience capital sustainable manner? How do we promote How do we citizen participation? create a liveable PwC city? 39
  38. 38. A changing picture of urban successCentral thesis: The more well-balanced a city is for both businesses and residents, the better it will farePwC Cities of Opportunity - What makes the difference? 40
  39. 39. City of the Future (CoF) measurement tool + “Dreaming” Intelligent City: City city of the future (CoF) ?Policy ? “Ignorant” city “Gambling” city - - Performance + The results of the tool, coupled with further analysis, may give the city an idea of where it stands in relation to being or becoming a CoF and PwC how to chart its path towards becoming a CoF. 41
  40. 40. Assessing Policy vs. Performance
  41. 41. Capital model measurement tool for cities Illustrative Vision 100 ICT Capital Leadership 75 Own Value Infrastructure Capital 50 Brand Benchmark 25 Best In Class Social Environmental Capital 0 Intelligence Culture & Leisure Capital Finance Capital Participation Intellectual & Political Social Capital Capital Capital The above spider graph allows a city to assess where its capital strengths and weaknesses are, in comparison to best practice andPwC international benchmarks. 43
  42. 42. Utrecht – City vs stakeholder perspective City perspective Stakeholder perspectivePwC 44
  43. 43. Solna – Assessment of its capitals Intellectual Capital 100 80 Infrastructure Social Capital Capital 60 40 20 0 Information &Communications Environmental Technology Capital Capital Participation and Culture and Political Capital Leisure Capital  PwC 45
  44. 44. Arendal – City positioning & developmentpotentialPwC 46
  45. 45. Result – Utrecht Development Board (UDB)Partnering to achieve successAs an independent advisory board, the UDB supports the Critical success factors for partnering__ city of Utrecht in realizing its potential. To achieve this, cooperation between local leaders, citizens and businesses is crucial for its success.The UDB has succeeded over the last year in working together with the municipality (setting up strategy) and executing the strategy by connecting various stakeholders of the city of Utrecht. In particular, UDB has created partnerships between various stakeholders within, and also outside, the city of Utrecht, including: • ‘City labs’ – working together (education, business communities, government organizations) on different challenges e.g. local labor market, broadband, civil society and new ways of working. • An annual encouragement award for the local economy, initiated by the UDB and the municipality • A permanent lobby to encourage the participation of industries within the city’s Strategic Agenda • Creating a new connection between the TradePwC 47 area and the municipality
  46. 46. Cities ofopportunityPwC 48
  47. 47. Cities of Opportunity is a highly visible thought leadership initiative reflecting PwC’s views on cities Central thesis: “The more well-balanced a city is for both businesses and residents, the better it will fare”• Reflects PwC’s holistic approach to city management• The report in its fourth edition is produced by PwC with support from the global network and the ISU and in cooperation with the Partnership for New York City.• Takes both a quantitative and qualitative look at the emerging picture of city life in 21 capitals of business, finance and culture worldwide.• To a great extent, the successes and shortcomings that surface in the study substantiate the central thesis of the research.• Cities of Opportunity may prove most useful for government officials, policymakers and business persons as a good orientation point on the move toward a city-centered world.• The study takes notice of the actions and policies that are working best for the common good, and its insights will prove valuable in that context. 49
  48. 48. How the cities rank overall Stockholm 23 5 Moscow London 21 14 Berlin Toronto 19 Paris Chicago 25San Francisco 24 20 26 New York 4 Istanbul Seoul 12 Beijing 10 11 13 15 Los Angeles 16 Houston Madrid Shanghai 8 Tokyo 7 Abu Dhabi 9 17 Mexico City 1 Hong Kong Mumbai 18 Singapore São Paulo Johannesburg 3 2 Santiago 6 22 Sydney PwC Partnership for New York City 50
  49. 49. Cities of Opportunity – Success Factors for CitiesPwC 51
  50. 50. Beta cities fared very well, compared to thedominant Alpha citiesTop 3 cities in each indicator New York/Intellectual capital and innovation Stockholm Toronto San Francisco Technology readiness New York Seoul StockholmTransportation and infrastructure Paris Chicago New York Demographics and livability Stockholm Sydney Toronto Economic Clout London Paris New York Cost Houston Los Angeles Chicago Lifestyle Assets New York Paris London Health, safety and security Stockholm Toronto Chicago 1 Ease of doing business Hong Kong Singapore New York 2 3 Sustainability Berlin Sydney StockholmPwC Cities of Opportunity - What makes the difference? 52
  51. 51. Indicator Rankings Indicator Best performing citiesIntellectual capital and innovation Stockholm Toronto New YorkTechnology readiness New York Seoul StockholmTransportation and infrastructure Paris Chicago New YorkDemographics and livability Stockholm Sydney TorontoEconomic Clout London Paris New YorkCost Houston Los Angeles ChicagoLifestyle Assets New York Paris LondonHealth, safety and security Stockholm Toronto ChicagoEase of doing business Hong Kong Singapore New YorkSustainability Berlin Sydney StockholmPwC Partnership for New York City 53
  52. 52. How it’s done … For example, 2 of 10 indicators + variables • Math/science skills attainment • Class size Social… • Percent of population with higher education • Literacy + enrollment • Libraries with public access Intellectual Capital • Research at top universities • Percent GDP spent on R+D + innovation • Intellectual property protection • Entrepreneurial environment • Mass transit coverage • Miles of mass transit track Economic … • Traffic congestion • Taxis • Cost of public transport Transportation + • Aircraft movements infrastructure • In/outgoing passenger flows • Airport to central business district ease • Skyscraper constructionPwC Partnership for New York City 54
  53. 53. Indicator and variable sampling • Math/science skills attainment Intellectual Capital • Percent of population with higher ed and innovation • Intellectual property protection • Mass transit coverage Transportation and • Miles of mass transit track infrastructure • Traffic congestion • Political environment Health, safety and • Crime security • Hospitals • Flexibility of visa travel Ease of doing • Foreign embassies or consulates business • Workforce management riskPwC Partnership for New York City 55
  54. 54. InnovationPwC 56
  55. 55. How manyseeds arethere in aapple?Traditionallythe rightquestion Business asusual…
  56. 56. …How manyapples are there in a seed..…New approach with new insights and increased opportunity space  Disruptiveinnovation and “rapidprotoptyping”…
  57. 57. Shaping the Future 59
  58. 58. A Constant Unique Tall Building…
  59. 59. The Worlds Tallest Building…II Simpósio Internacional PwC - Inovação em Gestão Pública
  60. 60. The Worlds Lowest Building…
  61. 61. FINALLY... We need a: Higher density of knowledge, innovation and solid relationships - inclusiveness Lower friction in communication, collaboration and between people, sectors and cultures Higher frequency and speed in citizen and stakeholder dialog in order to create the new! 3
  62. 62. The endPwC 64

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