Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

What is Goal Science?

4,084 views

Published on

Goal Science Thinking™ is a set of goal principles that helps people set better goals, and pursue their goals more successfully. It builds on frameworks like SMART and enhances highly-effective processes like OKRs and MBOs.

Published in: Leadership & Management
  • Be the first to comment

What is Goal Science?

  1. 1. 1 Goal Science™ Thinking
  2. 2. 2 A Brief History 2012 GST Goal Science Thinking! 1967 1973 1981 1984 1990 1999 S.M.A.R.T. George Doran’s “S.M.A.R.T. Way” MBOs The Effective Executive By Peter Drucker
  3. 3. 3 The Good and Bad of MBOs The Good The Bad • Infrequently updated • Siloed • Management-driven • Tied to performance reviews and compensation • MBOs ushered in era of results-oriented management
  4. 4. 4 The Good and Bad of SMART Goals • Attainable: research has proven that challenging goals are better • Focuses on the setting of goals, not pursuing • Stifles creative thinking for knowledge workers • Specific: absolutely critical • Measurable: good when appropriate • Relevant: aligned goals are better goals • Timely: deadlines boost performance • Better than no goals The Good The Bad
  5. 5. 5 20121967 1973 1981 1984 1990 1999 S.M.A.R.T. George Doran’s “S.M.A.R.T. Way” A Brief History OKRs John Doerr introduces OKRs to Google KPIs MBOs The Effective Executive By Peter Drucker
  6. 6. 6 The OKRs Revolution • Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) are invented at Intel • KPCB’s John Doerr brings OKRs to Google and more Benefits • Quarterly vs. Annual process • Transparent and aligned • Aspirational • Not tied to performance reviews/compensation
  7. 7. 7 How High Performing Companies Manage Goals Open Transparent and all individuals participate Frequent Quarterly and monthly check-ins Cross-Functional Horizontal coordination and dependency alignment
  8. 8. 8 A Brief History Today GST Goal Science Thinking 1967 1973 1981 1984 1990 1999 S.M.A.R.T. George Doran’s “S.M.A.R.T. Way” KPIs MBOs The Effective Executive By Peter Drucker OKRs John Doerr introduces OKRs to Google
  9. 9. 9 Goal Science Thinking • A set of principles that helps people achieve their goals ‒ Better goal-setting and goal-pursuing ‒ Enhances SMART goal-setting • Not a process like OKRs or MBOs • Goal Science thinking is based on: ‒ Leading academic research ‒ Consumer engagement techniques ‒ Data from our platform
  10. 10. 10 Goal Science Questions What? Who? When? How? Why? Concrete and focused You and your coworkers Continually Progress and feedback Make an impact • You know exactly what your goals are, and how they interrelate to your business as a whole. • You focus on 3-5 goals at a time. • Your goals are quantifiable with clear metrics and milestones. • Your goals are yours to create and own, but they connect to others too. • Having a supportive community alongside you increases goal progress. • The aspirational, future goals you want take time. You have smaller steps along the way to help reach them. • The workplace is dynamic. Adapting goals when appropriate helps you stay flexible and on track. • Progress is the positive force motivating you to do your best. • Achieving small steps makes feedback relevant, which further fuels momentum. • You want to accomplish challenging things at work, and make a difference. • Mastering aspirational, meaningful goals leads to greater engagement, performance, and satisfaction at work.
  11. 11. 11 Goal Science™ Thinking Connected Supported Progress-based Adaptable Aspirational Transparent and aligned Social reinforcement and recognition Frequent and measurable feedback Flexibility to respond to changing priorities Retrospection to encourage excellence
  12. 12. 12 • Individuals will achieve more when they are connected and have an internal sense of what they can do to make the biggest impact for the business • Goals need to be connected in three ways – Vertical: cascading of goals is challenging at organizational scale, including bottoms-up goals ‒ Only 6% of managers have meetings/discussions to set goals throughout the year – Company/Mission: An individual can clearly see how his or her goals connect to the company goals and mission, making goals more meaningful – Horizontal: capturing cross-functional dependencies is difficult has major operational implications Connected
  13. 13. 13 Alignment at a Glance™ Connected Top-down, bottom-up, and horizontal alignment
  14. 14. 14 Connected Top-down, bottom-up, and horizontal alignment See how people connect with Goal Chart
  15. 15. 15 Connected Top-down, bottom-up, and horizontal alignment Create and cascade goals
  16. 16. 16 Connected Top-down, bottom-up, and horizontal alignment Set bottom-up milestones and goals
  17. 17. 17 Supported Top-down, bottom-up, and horizontal alignment 0 20 40 60 80 100 Goal success Matthews, Gail. "Goals Research Summary." (2013). No writing Writing Writing & sharing Writing, sharing & feedback GoalSuccess
  18. 18. 18 • Transparent goal setting creates a social contract – Employees are accountable for their goals – Co-workers are accountable for helping them achieve those goals • Visibility fosters more recognition and encouragement – #1 factor for happiness at work: appreciation for your work • Celebrating success with social gestures is very effective – 90% of cheers result in a returned cheer or nudge Supported
  19. 19. 19 Supported Working transparently with social reinforcement and recognition Work Profile™
  20. 20. 20 Supported Working transparently with social reinforcement and recognition @Mentions
  21. 21. 21 Follow or add followers to goals Supported Working transparently with social reinforcement and recognition
  22. 22. 22 • Fitbit users – 43% more steps than non-Fitbit users – Lose 13 lbs – After 12 weeks they are up to 30-40% more active • Quantified self: people want frequent, measurable, and visual feedback • Progress towards meaningful work is the strongest workplace motivator Progress-based
  23. 23. 23 Company Dashboards Relevant feedback and frequent wins Progress-based
  24. 24. 24 Beautifully visualized goal data Relevant feedback and frequent wins Progress-based
  25. 25. 25 Relevant feedback and frequent wins Progress-based Weekly planning digests
  26. 26. 26 Real-time notifications Relevant feedback and frequent wins Progress-based
  27. 27. 27 Adaptable High agility orgs: More likely to capitalize on change High agility employees: More likely to be top quartile performers 4.5x 3.5x
  28. 28. 28 • An annual cadence for goal setting is almost like having no goals at all • Highly agile or quarterly goal setting organizations like Google: – 4.5x likely to capitalize on change – 5x likely to have cultures fostering innovation and trust – 4x more likely to value creativity • High agility employees are 3.5x likely to be top quartile performers • A lack of adaptability has major operational implications – 66% of managers don’t revise their goals throughout the year Adaptable
  29. 29. 29 Edit goals when necessary Flexibility to respond to changing business needs Adaptable
  30. 30. 30 Add goals to your calendar Flexibility to respond to changing business needs Adaptable
  31. 31. 31 Manage goals on any device Flexibility to respond to changing business needs Adaptable
  32. 32. 32 • Stretch goals produce the highest levels of effort and performance • Because goals should be difficult to achieve, they should not be tightly coupled to compensation – Tight coupling can lead to sandbagging • Aspirational goals need to be personally meaningful – Not all goals should come from corporate – GV partner Rick Klau suggests more than 50% of goals should originate from employees – Securing employee participation = reaching previously unattainable goals Aspirational
  33. 33. 33 Aspirational Greater achievement and encourage excellence

×