Advanced troubleshooting

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Advanced troubleshooting

  1. 1. Advanced Troubleshooting Introduction In your career as a technician, it is important that you develop advanced skills in troubleshooting techniques and diagnostic methods for computer components, operating systems, networks, laptops, printers, and security issues. Advanced troubleshooting can sometimes mean that the problem is unique or that the solution is difficult to perform. More often, advanced troubleshooting means that the probable cause is difficult to diagnose. Advanced troubleshooting uses not only your advanced diagnostic skills when working with hardware and software, but also the interaction between technicians and customers or other technicians. The way in which you work with customers and other technicians can determine how quickly and comprehensively the problem gets diagnosed and solved. Take advantage of your resources, other technicians, and the online technician community to get answers to your diagnostic challenges. You might be able to help another technician with a problem. Computer Components and Peripherals Apply Troubleshooting Process to Computer Components and Peripherals
  2. 2. The troubleshooting process helps resolve problems with the computer or peripherals. These problems range from simple, such as updating a drive, to more complex problems, such as installing a CPU. Use the troubleshooting steps as a guideline to help you diagnose and repair problems. The first step in the troubleshooting process is to identify the problem. Figure 1 shows a list of open-ended and closed-ended questions to ask the customer. After you have talked to the customer, you can establish a theory of probable cause. Figure 2 shows a list of some common probable causes of computer or peripheral problems. After you have developed some theories about what is wrong, test your theories to determine the cause of the problem. Figure 3 shows a list of quick procedures that can determine the exact cause of the problem or even correct the problem. If a quick procedure corrects the problem, you can go to step 5 to verify full system functionality. If a quick procedure does not correct the problem, you might need to research the problem further to establish the exact cause. After you have determined the exact cause of the problem, establish a plan of action to resolve the problem and implement the solution. Figure 4 shows some sources you can use to gather additional information to resolve an issue. After you have corrected the problem, verify full functionality and, if applicable, implement preventive measures. Figure 5 shows a list of the steps to verify the solution. In the final step of the troubleshooting process, you must document your findings, actions, and outcomes. Figure 6 shows a list of the tasks required to document the problem and the solution.
  3. 3. Computer Components and Peripherals Apply Troubleshooting Process to Computer Components and Peripherals
  4. 4. Computer problems can be attributed to hardware, software, networks, or some combination of the three. You will resolve some types of problems more often than others. The figure shows a chart of common problems and solutions.
  5. 5. Computer Components and Peripherals Apply Troubleshooting Process to Computer Components and Peripherals
  6. 6. Now that you understand the troubleshooting process, it is time to apply your listening and diagnostic skills. The first lab is designed to test your troubleshooting skills with computer and peripheral problems. You will troubleshoot and fix a computer that does not boot. The second lab is designed to reinforce your communication and troubleshooting skills. In this lab, you will perform the following steps: Step 1. Receive the work order. Step 2. Talk the customer through various steps to try and resolve the problem. Step 3. Document the problem and the resolution. The third, fourth and fifth labs are designed to reinforce your skills with computer and peripheral problems. You will troubleshoot and repair a computer that has more than one problem. Operating Systems Apply Troubleshooting Process to Operating Systems The troubleshooting process helps resolve problems with the operating system. Use the troubleshooting steps as a guideline to help you diagnose and repair problems. The first step in the troubleshooting process is to identify the problem. Figure 1 shows a list of open-ended and closed-ended questions to ask the customer. After you have talked to the customer, you can establish a theory of probable cause. Figure 2 shows a list of some common probable causes for operating system problems. After you have developed some theories about what is wrong, test your theories to determine the cause of the problem. Figure 3 shows a list of quick procedures that can determine the exact cause of the problem or even correct the problem. If a quick procedure corrects the problem, you can go to step 5 to verify full system functionality. If a quick procedure does not correct the problem, you might need to research the problem further to establish the exact cause. After you have determined the exact cause of the problem, establish a plan of action to resolve the problem and implement the solution. Figure 4 shows some sources you can use to gather additional information to resolve an issue. After you have corrected the problem, verify full functionality and, if applicable, implement preventive measures. Figure 5 shows a list of the steps to verify the solution.
  7. 7. In the final step of the troubleshooting process, you must document your findings, actions, and outcomes. Figure 6 shows a list of the tasks required to document the problem and the solution.
  8. 8. Operating Systems Apply Troubleshooting Process to Operating Systems
  9. 9. Operating system problems can be attributed to hardware, software, networks, or some combination of the three. You will resolve some types of OS problems more often than others. A stop error is a hardware or software malfunction that causes the system to lock up. An example of this type of error is known as the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) and appears when the system is unable to recover from an error. The BSOD is usually caused by device driver errors. The Event Log and other diagnostic utilities are available to research a stop error or BSOD error. To prevent these types of errors, verify that the hardware and software drivers are compatible. In addition, install the latest patches and updates for Windows. When the system locks up during startup, the computer can automatically reboot. The reboot is caused by the auto restart function in Windows and makes it difficult to see the error message. The auto restart function can be disabled in the Advanced Startup Options menu. The chart shows common operating system problems and solutions.
  10. 10. Operating Systems
  11. 11. Apply Troubleshooting Process to Operating Systems Now that you understand the troubleshooting process, it is time to apply your listening and diagnostic skills. The first lab is designed to reinforce your skills with the operating system. You will check restore points before and after using Windows Update. The second lab is designed to reinforce your communication and troubleshooting skills. In this lab, you will perform the following steps: Step 1. Receive the work order. Step 2. Talk the customer through various steps to try and resolve the problem. Step 3. Document the problem and the resolution. The third, fourth, and fifth labs are designed to reinforce your skills with operating system problems. You will troubleshoot and repair a computer that has more than one problem. Networks Apply Troubleshooting Process to Networks To begin troubleshooting a network problem, you should first try to locate the source of the problem. Check to see whether a group of users, or only one user, has the problem. If only one user has the problem, begin troubleshooting with that user's computer. The first step in the troubleshooting process is to identify the problem. Figure 1 shows a list of open-ended and closed-ended questions to ask the customer. After you have talked to the customer, you can establish a theory of probable cause. Figure 2 shows a list of some common probable causes for network problems. After you have developed some theories about what is wrong, test your theories to determine the cause of the problem. Figure 3 shows a list of quick procedures that can determine the exact cause of the problem or even correct the problem. If a quick procedure corrects the problem, you can go to step 5 to verify full system functionality. If a quick procedure does not correct the problem, you might need to research the problem further to establish the exact cause. After you have determined the exact cause of the problem, establish a plan of action to resolve the problem and implement the solution. Figure 4 shows some sources you can use to gather additional information to resolve an issue.
  12. 12. After you have corrected the problem, verify full functionality and, if applicable, implement preventive measures. Figure 5 shows a list of the steps to verify the solution. In the final step of the troubleshooting process, you must document your findings, actions, and outcomes. Figure 6 shows a list of the tasks required to document the problem and the solution.
  13. 13. Networks Apply Troubleshooting Process to Networks Network problems can be attributed to hardware, software, or a combination of the two. You will resolve some types of problems more often than others, while other problems may require more in-depth troubleshooting skills. Network Connection Problems
  14. 14. These types of connection problems are often related to incorrect TCP/IP configurations, firewall settings, or devices that have stopped working, as shown in Figure 1. Email Failure Not being able to send or receive email is often caused by incorrect email software settings, firewall settings, and hardware connectivity issues, as shown in Figure 2. FTP and Secure Internet Connection Problems File transfer problems between FTP clients and servers are often caused by incorrect IP address and port settings, or security policies. Secure Internet connection problems are often related to incorrect certificate settings and ports blocked by software or hardware, as shown in Figure 3. Problems Revealed by CLI Commands Unexpected information reported from CLI commands is often caused by incorrect IP address settings, hardware connection issues, and firewall settings, as shown in Figure 4.

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