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Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
Odyssey Class Project
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Odyssey Class Project

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EJHS students Odyssey projects

EJHS students Odyssey projects

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  • The Trojan War(in a minute)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Odyssey
    • 2.
    • 3.
    • 4.
    • 5.
    • 6.
    • 7.
    • 8.
    • 9.
    • 10.
    • 11. Antinous
      Suitor Extraordinaire
    • 12. Antinous- The Original Jerk
      Antinous was one of Penelope’s chief suitors.
      He was also one of the meanest, most disliked, and was responsible for all the suitors moving into Odysseus’ house.
      Antinous even attempted to kill Odysseus’ son, Telemachus, upon Telemachus’ return from Menelaus. Luckily however, Telemachus avoided the trap.
      Antinous is the first suitor to be slain. Odysseus shot him through the throat with an arrow while Antinous was drinking.
      Antinous had a complete disregard for the Greek rules of hospitality, and, ironically, this was the reason he was killed. When Odysseus came disguised as a beggar to his own house Antinous turned him away, and this was an offense equal to blaspheming the gods.
    • 13.
      • Goddess of love and beauty
      • 14. Zeus married her to Hephaestus
      • 15. Aphrodite was also known as “Kypris” and “Cytherea” after the two places, Cyprus and Kythira, which claim her birth.
      • 16. She is characterized as vain, ill-tempered, and easily offended.
      • 17. Daughter of Zeus, king of the gods.
      • 18. She granted Paris protection and the most beautiful mortal wife if he would chose her the most beautiful between her and two other goddesses, Athena and Hera, and he did.
      • 19. Aphrodite had a festival of her own, the Aphrodisia, which was celebrated all over Greece, but particularly in Athens and Corinth.
      Aphrodite
    • 20. “Calliope” by Marcello Bacciarelli
      Calliope (The Muse)
      Calliope is the Muse of epic poetry
      There are 9 Muses
      The Muses are the goddesses of literature and poetry.
      Calliope’s name means “beautiful voice”.
    • 21. Calypso
      Calypso (also known as Atlantis) was a sea nymph who lived on the island of Ogygia. She was the daughter of Tethys and Atlas. She was confined to the island for supporting her father and the Titans during the Titanomachy. After the last of Odysseus’ men had perished at sea, Odysseus himself was washed ashore on Ogygia, where Calypso became enamored of him, taking him as her lover and promising him immortality if he would stay with her. She imprisoned Odysseus on her island in order to make him her immortal husband. Eventually, Athena asked Zeus to spare Odysseus of his torment on the island, as he longs for his wife Penelope. Zeus releases Odysseus when he sends Hermes to Ogygia to order Calypso to set Odysseus free. She complied reluctantly, allowing Odysseus to construct a small boat and set sail from the island. In her sadness she attempted suicide, but she is thwarted by her own immortality. She bore Odysseus two children, Nausithous and Nausinous.
    • 22. Circe by Nicole Schane
      • Circe was a sorceress living on the island of Aeaea.
      • 23. Her father was Helios, the god of the sun and owner of the land where Odysseus’ men ate cattle.
      • 24. Her mother was Perse, an oceanid.
      • 25. She was the sister of two kings of Colchis and of Pasiphaë, and the mother of Minotaur.
      • 26. Circe transformed her enemies, or those who offended her, into animals through the use of her magical wand and potions.
      • 27. Her daughter is Aega, the goddess of the sun.
      • 28. Circe and Odysseus had a child together named Telegonus who later ruled over the Tyrsenians.
      • 29. She is renowned for her knowledge of magic and poisonous herbs.
    • This is a picture of Circe.
      • During the nights, Circe could be wasted in fear because of the uncontrolled visions which filled her house.
      • 30. When visitors came to Circe’s house they said to have seen beasts roaming around acting as domesticated animals showing their kindness by wagging their tails.
      • 31. Some say they were drugged victims of Circe.
    • Zeus was known in Greek mythology as the king of gods. Zeus ruled Mount Olympus and was the god of sky and thunder. He was also a dominant role, commanding over the Greek Olympian pantheon. Zeus was a supreme cultural artifact, on which many Greek religions were founded. Zeus plays a major role in the Odyssey because he favors Odysseus.
      Zeus
    • 32. APOLLO
      • God of sun, truth, music, and prophecy.
      • 33. Leader of the muses and director of their choir.
      • 34. Son of Zeus and Leto.
      • 35. Twin brother of Artemis.
      • 36. Know as the destroyer of rats and locust.
      • 37. Paean is a song sung to honor Apollo.
      • 38. Responsible for driving the sun across the sky.
      • 39. The crow is his bird and the dolphin is his animal.
      Dylan Mobley
    • 40.
    • 41. LaertesKing of Ithaca
      Laertes, son of Arcesius, is the father of Odysseus.
      Laertes was Odysseus’s foster father. Begotten by the son of Hermes, Autolycu, Who often stole wives from husbands.
      Laertes willingly forgave his wife, Anticlea, and became a good father to Odysseus.
      In his last years, Athena rejuvinated Laertes in order to fight with his son against the families of the suitors Odysseus had killed after they tried to take his kingdom and wife.
      By: gabbi vaLLE.
      In the photograph, Laertes is shown with his wife, Ophelia.
    • 42. POLYPHEMUS
      Of the Cyclopes race . . .
    • 43. Polyphemus was a Cyclops from an island ruled by the Cyclopes race.
      He had returned to his cave dwelling to find Odysseus and a dozen of his crew inside.
      Polyphemus tells Odysseus that he is not afraid of the Greek Gods and customs.
      Then Polyphemus rolls a giant stone over the opening of the cave, and quickly devours two of Odysseus’s men.
      POLYPHEMUS
    • 44. That morning, Polyphemus ate two more of Odysseus’s men, and went out to work.
      While he was away, Odysseus and his men sharpened a log to use as a weapon. When Polyphemus came back, the soldiers shoved the sharpened log into the one-eyed Polyphemus.
      POLYPHEMUS
    • 45. After being blinded by the Greeks, Polyphemus searched unsuccessfully for the soldiers.
      That morning, when Polyphemus let his sheep out, but before he did, he searched each and every one of the sheep’s backs to see if the Greeks were riding on them.
      However, he did not check the underside of the sheep, where the soldiers had tied themselves.
      The Greeks got away from Polyphemus, and Polyphemus pleaded with his father Zeus to seek revenge on the Greek soldiers.
      POLYPHEMUS
    • 46. Homer
      Homer was a Greek poet and was the initial story teller of both the Iliad and the Odyssey. Most people believe that Homer was blind because he described everything by using his sense of hearing and smell rather then his sense of sight. Homer lived around 800 B.C and his poems have taught us many lessons. Also his stories have inspired philosophers and students alike for thousands of years and they will till the end of time.
    • 47. The Trojan War
      (in a minute)
      • The war began when King Menelaus invited Prince Paris to Sparta. King Menelaus’s wife, Helen, was lonely and fell in to lust with Paris. She left with him to Troy, thus sparking the Trojan War.
      • 48. King Menelaus was infuriated and called on his Greek cousins and fellow suitors of Helen to help him get his revenge.
      • 49. Once the Greeks landed out Troy however, the realized they had bit off a bit more than they could chew. The walls of Troy were shut fast and the greeks couldn’t defeat them on the open field either. The battles raged for ten years.
    • Continued……
      • Menelaus wanted the conflict to end, so he challenged Paris to a duel. Paris fought Menelaus but was greatly outmatched. Just as Menelaus was about to kill Paris, Aphrodite swept in and saved him. Menelaus was infuriated. Claiming he had won by default. The Trojans agreed, but some idiot shot at Menelaus, sparking the conflict anew.
      • 50. Finally, Odysseus thought of an idea to trick the Trojans. He designed the Trojan horse, and snuck into the city at night. The Greeks stormed Troy, slaughtering everyone and pillaging the city. Odysseus was praised, and he boasted himself. Because of his vanity, Odysseus was plagued with troubles on his way home. Which sets the stage for our story, the Odyssey.
    • Alcinous
      • Alcinous was the king of the Phaeacians, in whose court Odysseus tells his story.
      • 51. Alcinous is the grandson of Poseidon.
      • 52. Alcinous was a welcoming king.
      • 53. Alcinous was known for his hospitality to strangers.
      • 54. “King Alcinous and his Phaeacians… are decent, civilized, and kind.”
      –CliffsNotes.com
      Stephanie Williams
    • 55. Charybdis
    • 56. Charybdis
      Charybdis was a sea monster, once a beautiful naiad and the daughter Poseidon and Gaia.
      She takes forms as a huge creature whose face was all mouth and whose arms were all flippers. She swallows huge amounts of water 3 times a day before belching them back out again, creating whirlpools.
      The myth has Charybdis lying on one side of a narrow channel of water while Scylla (another sea monster) was on the other side of the strait.
      They were so close together that when sailors used to sail through there, they sailed away trying to avoid Scylla and got to close to Charybdis. The phrase “between Scylla and Charybdis” is said to be the origin of the phrase “between a rock and a hard place”.
    • 57. > The Goddess of wisdom, skill, and battle
      > Daughter of Zeus and Metis
      > One of the most important Olympian deities
      > Guardian of cities
      >She was born fully armed
      > The owl is her symbol
      > She created the olive tree
      Athena
    • 58. Aeolus
      The Greek god of winds.
    • 59. Who is Aeolus?
      Aeolus is the Greek god of winds who lived on the floating island of Aeolia.
      Aeolus was the son of Hippotas and Melanippe.
      He was the husband of Amphithea and had six sons and six daughters.
    • 60. The Names of Aeolus’ Children
      Lapithus
      Astyochus
      Xanthus
      Ardocles
      Pheraemon
      Cance
      Jocastus
      Agathrnus
      Arne
      Polymele
      Diores
      Macareus
    • 61. Aeolus’ Symbol
      Aeolus’ s symbol is a bag with wind escaping out of it.
      Unfortunately I was not able to find the symbol.
    • 62. Why is He so Important?
      He played an important role in The Odyssey.
      He gave Odysseus a back of winds to carry him and his ships home to Ithaca.
      Unfortunately his men thought he was hiding gold from them, and unleashed the winds the opposite way towards the island of Lipera.
    • 63. Odysseus
      Main hero in the Odyssey
      King of Ithaca and captain of his ship
      Becomes an enemy of Poseidon, god of the sea and earthquakes
      Struggles for ten years against Poseidon and many other outside forces to get back to his home and wife, Penelope.
    • 64. Persephone
      By Cheyenne Mickelson
    • 65. Persephone
      Persephone is the wife of Hades, God of the underworld.
      She is the daughter of Demeter, goddess of the harvest and Zeus, king of gods.
      She was abducted by Hades and became his wife.
    • 66. Persephone
      Her abduction and time spent in the Underworld is used to explain the changing of the seasons.
      The Homeric form of her name is Persephoneia
      Persephone is sometimes referred to as “Queen of the Dead.”
    • 67. Tiresias
      Blind prophet of the Underworld
    • 68. Tiresias
      Blind prophet in the Underworld from Thebes
      Prince of Thebes
      Odysseus was told to see him by the goddess Kirke
      After Odysseus talked to Tiresias he could return to Ithaca
      Tiresias told Odysseus that he would encounter Helios's herd on Thrinacia
    • 69. Tiresias cont.
      He told them to avoid the herd but if they didn’t they would die
      Then he would return to Ithaca and find suitors eating his food and courting his wife and he would either kill them or send them away
      Then he would go find a place where they didn’t know the sea and ate unsalted meat and there he would sacrifice a ram or bull to Poseidon
      After he did this he could return home
    • 70. Syclla
      In Greek mythology, a sea monster who lived underneath a dangerous rock at one side of the Strait of Messia, opposite the whirlpool Charybdis. She threatened the passing ships and in the Odyssey ate six of Odysseus’s companions.
      Syclla was a nymph and the daughter of Phorcys. The fishermen-turned -sea-god Glacus fell madly in love with Syclla ,but she fled from him onto the land where he could not follow. So he went to the sorceress Circe to ask for a love potion to melt Syclla’s heart. As he told his tale of love to Circe, she herself fell in love with him. Circe wooed him with her sweet words and looks, but Glacus didn’t want anything to do with Circe. Circe was very angry and prepared a very powerful poison and poured it into the pool where Syclla bathed. As soon as Syclla entered the water she was transformed into a monster.
      She had twelve feet and six hands, each with rows of teeth. Below the waist her body was made up of different monsters , like dogs, who barked non stop. She stood there in utter misery unable to move , loathing , and destroying everything that came into her reach. Whenever a ship passed each of her heads would seize one of the crew.
      Sky Warganich
    • 71. Helios
      Helios is the Greek Titan sun god.
      He is thought to ride a chariot drawn by horses through the sky, bringing light to the earth.
      The horses were called “ fire-darting steeds”, and were named Pyrios, Aeos, Aethon, and Phlegon.
      Helios is the son of Titans Theia and Hyperion.
      He sometimes referred to as Helios Panoptes meaning “the all seeing”.
      Helios is also called the Guardian of Oaths and the Gift of Sight.
      He lived in the River Okeanos at the eastern ends of the earth.
      Helios is depicted as a handsome, usually beardless man, clothed in purple robes and crowned with the shining aureole of the sun.
    • 72. Telemachus
      He is son of Odysseus and Penelope.
      He has a stout heart and an active mind.
      His Greek name means “far away fighter”.
      Telemachus was born not long before the Trojan war began.
      He does not marry in the Odyssey but in two different Greek literature he marries Nausicaa and Circe.
    • 73. The Lotus Eaters
      The Ideal Stoners
      By: Adam Smedley
      The Lotus Eaters were a tribe of people who lived on an island off the North coast of Africa. They were a care free people who had become enticed by the lotus flower.
      The lotus flower grows in muddy swamps and is the only flower that is also a fruit.
      Odysseus and his men arrived on the island of the lotus eaters nine days after the defeat of troy.
    • 74. When Odysseus and his men arrived on the island three soldiers were sent to scout the island. When those three men did not return Odysseus had to search for them, and he found them all right. To his horror the men had eaten the lotus. They had no want or intention to return home thus the lotus eaters had ensnared their new victims.
      Odysseus had to take each man and tie him down to the bench of his ship.
      This probably wasn’t what Odysseus looked like but there is water in the background!
    • 75. Eurycleia
      • Nurse of Odysseus
      • 76. Daughter of Ops, purchased by Laertes,
      brought up by Telemachus
      • First person to recognize Odysseus after
      he returned home from the Trojan War,
      though he was disguised as a beggar,
      but she knew it was him by a scar above
      his knee.
    • 77. The Sirens
      • Three dangerous bird-women who compelled sailors with enchanting music and voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast.
      • 78. Daughters of the river god, Achelous.
      • 79. These sea nymphs sang sweetly to these sailors.
      • 80. They have the legs of birds and played the harp.
    • Poseidon
      Poseidon is the god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses
      He had a bad temper. When he was mad he would strike the ground with his trident and create unruly springs, earthquakes, ship wrecks, and drownings
      However when he was in a good mood he would create islands from the sea and have a calm sea.
      Poseidon is Greek for “husband”
      Poseidon married a sea nymph named Amphitrite
      Tommy Stockhausen
    • 81. Music –
      Cautious Path by Curious Jay

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