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  • How you can help them and how they can find you – leads into the ISEMP introduction
  • By listening and participating actively in today’s workshop, you’ll vastly improve your skills in information seeking, which will help improve your grades and help you to success in your academic career.
  • Student ID and PIN overview
  • Student ID and PIN overview
  • This will depend on the group of students and their assignment
  • We could find out all about this using Wikipedia, right?Perhaps start with Wikipedia – to get them to understand where you’re going with this, say “Wikipedia works for day-to-day questions, but why can’t you use just Wikipedia for all your research needs?” You’re looking for them to understand that a single source, regardless of what it is, is not enough for their research, even if it seems to provide all the answers they need…because it’s providing just one perspective, one author’s viewpoint. Facts may have been excluded or modified. You have to use a variety of sources to ensure you’ve got the best information, and the broadest perspective.List potential sources on the screen or on the board – the ones students suggest and you suggest will depend on the research topic
  • Do a quick search for your question, together. Have students look at the first page of results and see if they intuitively know the best from the worst (this can be just by the names of the links and their domain suffixes, or you could pick one or two (one good, one bad) and present the question openly (“Do you think this website is trustworthy, or not? Why or why not? Think about it and then we’ll discuss it.”). You could also do this with preselected websites which you lead students to with links. After the open discussion, present the CAARS/CRAAP acronym to fill in additional considerations. Could also do this in reverse, using the CAARS evaluation tool up front [depends on timing and audience]
  • Do a quick search for your question, together. Have students look at the first page of results and see if they intuitively know the best from the worst (this can be just by the names of the links and their domain suffixes, or you could pick one or two (one good, one bad) and present the question openly (“Do you think this website is trustworthy, or not? Why or why not? Think about it and then we’ll discuss it.”). You could also do this with preselected websites which you lead students to with links. After the open discussion, present the CAARS/CRAAP acronym to fill in additional considerations. Could also do this in reverse, using the CAARS evaluation tool up front [depends on timing and audience]
  • Do a quick search for your question, together. Have students look at the first page of results and see if they intuitively know the best from the worst (this can be just by the names of the links and their domain suffixes, or you could pick one or two (one good, one bad) and present the question openly (“Do you think this website is trustworthy, or not? Why or why not? Think about it and then we’ll discuss it.”). You could also do this with preselected websites which you lead students to with links. After the open discussion, present the CAARS/CRAAP acronym to fill in additional considerations. Could also do this in reverse, using the CAARS evaluation tool up front [depends on timing and audience]
  • Facebook:Social mediaSocial NetworksWeb 2.0TechnologyWebsitesInternetAcademic Performance:EducationHigher EducationLearningGradesGPAStudentsCollege StudentsUniversity StudentsBehaviour
  • Use the print examples you brought to explain what a student can find in a database. Emphasize variety of information, ease of use, scholarly holdings, quality of information and tools provided for organizing resultsAcademic Search CompleteFacility Management AutomationEXPANDFacility Management OR Building Management OR Real Estate Management OR FacilitiesAutomation or Automatic Control
  • Use the print examples you brought to explain what a student can find in a database. Emphasize variety of information, ease of use, scholarly holdings, quality of information and tools provided for organizing resultsAcademic Search CompleteFacility Management AutomationEXPANDFacility Management OR Building Management OR Real Estate Management OR FacilitiesAutomation or Automatic Control
  • Google Scholar orders your searchPhilipp Mayr and Anne-Kathrin Walter 85FIGURE 1. Google Scholar ApproachDownloaded By: [Canadian Research Knowledge Network] At: 17:34 15 May 2011results by how relevant they are to your query, so the most usefulreferences should appear at the top of the page. This relevance rankingtakes into account the full text of each article as well as the article’sauthor, the publication in which the article appeared and howoften it has been cited in scholarly literature. Google Scholar alsoautomatically analyzes and extracts citations and presents them asseparate results, even if the documents they refer to are not online.This means your search results may include citations of older worksand seminal articles that appear only in books or other offline publications.”
  • Discuss the above as the two principle ways to find information through the library.Direct students to go the LRC homepage to get started. Proceed with search examples without additional slides.
  • This page links to the Contact Us page by clicking on the screen shot of Contact Us.

Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to Research forMechanical Systems EngineeringUsing the Library Resource Centre Melanie Parlette-Stewart, BA, MLIS Program Liaison February 2013
  • 2. I AM . . .Melanie Parlette-StewartLRC Program LiaisonSchool of Engineering and Information TechnologyEmail: mparlettestewart@conestogac.on.caTwitter: @ConestogaLib_MP
  • 3. TODAY we will :1. Improve your search skills through “pre-searching” and “re-searching” to refine keyword strategies2. Locate various types of resources to balance your research with high quality information from the LRC’s collections3. Understand the criteria you can use to evaluate resources to ensure they are of good quality.4. Discover resources to assist you in creating proper citations
  • 4. Off-Campus Access Visit the LRC to PIN NUMBERS - You can use your PIN to: get your PIN. • Access resources from Off-Campus Don’t forget to bring • Renew a book, place a hold your student card • Review your account with the 2013 sticker on it!
  • 5. LRC Homepage  Research Help  Engineering  Mechanical Systems EngineeringYOUR Research Guide http://bit.ly/MechanicalSysKey Tabs:• Articles from Databases• Books . . .• Cite Your Sources• Contact Us
  • 6. Today’s Research Topic is….•Is there a relationship Facebook use and academic performance?
  • 7. Finding A Source to AnswerYour Question• Where do we begin? • Google • Wikipedia • Other suggestions…
  • 8. Types of Sources What’s the Difference?Scholarly Journals Popular Magazines Trade Journals Conference Papers Technical Reports• Scholarly research or • General interest articles, • Industry related • Author is scholar in field, • Author is often a scholar projects. entertainment, or information, news and academic or researcher or a scientist, engineer,• Illustrations are usually information aimed at trends. Some • Conference papers tend government contractor, charts and graphs. the consumer. Usually illustrations. to be more recent than or technical personnel.• Authors are authorities colour photographs and • Authors are industry journal articles, but may • Published by a in their field. Often illustrations. experts, professionals, be considered less corporation or professors or • Articles are usually or practitioners who are authoritative depending educational institution researchers. written by magazine not always identified on the review and • Reputation is everything• Peer review process is in staff, freelance writers, • Typically no peer review acceptance process • Typically not peer place where the content or may be anonymous. or refereeing process. • Peer Review Process reviewed of an article is reviewed • No peer review or may or may not be Example: by one or more experts refereeing process. Examples: rigorous Design and Fabrication of a in the field. ASME Mechanical Tank-Applied Broad Area Examples: Engineering Magazine Example: Cooling Shield CouponExamples: Wired, Popular Mechanics Proceedings of ASME HeatIEEE/ASME transactions Transfer Divisionon mechatronics
  • 9. Balanced Research Effective research taps into a variety of sources Encyclopedias Websites Books Technical Scholarly Papers Journals Conference Newspapers Papers Professional Magazine (aka Trade Journals)
  • 10. Choosing Better Sources • How can you tell trustworthy information (the “better” information) from less- trustworthy information (“worse” information)?The CARS Test • Credibility Look for believable, well written information that is free of bias. Locate information about the author(s) and their credentials. How credible are the authors, what is their level of expertise on this particular topic. • Accuracy The information should be up-to-date, clear. You can confirm accuracy by locating information from a variety of sources. Look for a last updated date. • Reasonableness Information should be present objective and balanced arguments. • Support Other sources should support the information found. Always look for a reference list, bibliography or citations demonstrating where the information came from.
  • 11. Pre-Searching:Thinking About Your Search• What are the keywords or phrases in the question that you would use in your search?• Also think of synonyms and related terms….
  • 12. Pre-Searching: Academic Facebook PerformanceRelated Terms or Synonyms (words that Related Terms or Synonyms (words thatmean the same as the first term, above) mean the same as the first term, above)
  • 13. Let’s Research : LRC Discover Tool Facebook and Academic Performance http://www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc/
  • 14. Let’s Re/search: Don’t forget to Re/Search:  Full Text  Date  Source Type  Subject
  • 15. Searching A Database. . . Actually let’s The power of Search Costs search Life Cycle Costs the * Narrow by Life Cycle Let’s add Publication Date Energy Cost* Narrow by Peer Reviewed* (the asterisk wildcard)As the name implies, * can be substituted for any number of letters. This is particularly useful to include all wordswith a certain term and any suffix after it. Simply apply the asterisk to the end of a term and it will return alldocuments containing that term, followed by anything. For example: biostatistic* will find biostatistician orbiostatistics or biostatistical
  • 16. Searching A Database. . . Mechanical “Mechanical Expand Search by Engineering Engineering” including Full Text Narrow by Publication Add to Peer Date 2007 - RefWorks Reviewed 2013 Quotation Marks: " " Enclose specific phrases in quotation marks. This will direct the search engine to search the database for documents containing that exact phrase. A search for analytical chemist (without quotes) will return any document containing analytical and chemist with anything in between. If you place quotes around the phrase, searching for “facility management“ it will only documents with facility and management right beside each other.
  • 17. Let’s Re/search: Don’t forget to try using other “PRE- SEARCHING” terms: Ex: Social Networks and Media and Grades . . . and again: don’t forget to Re/Search:  Full Text  Date  Source Type  Subject
  • 18. WHAT IS GOOGLE SCHOLAR?A search interface for locating citations to academicresearch—and accessing the full-text online (sometimes).This is the definition of any research database.Google Scholar is just one more in a host of research toolssimilar to those offered by the library (but using it is free toall).Reading articles found in it is not free (not always, anyway).
  • 19. What can you search usinggoogle scholar?“…articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, fromacademic publishers, professional societies, online repositories,universities and other web sites.” • Some resources are “open access,” i.e. free • Many have a cost-per-article • The LRC can help improve access to the costly articles (but more on that later) Google. (2011). About Google Scholar. Retrieved from http://scholar.google.ca/intl/en/scholar/about.html
  • 20. What can’t you find usinggoogle scholar?• Google doesn’t search everything, and neither does Google Scholar• Only searches “scholarly” sources• So it does not search the following resources: • Newspapers • Trade Magazines • Professional Magazines • General Interest Magazines
  • 21. Google ≠ Good• What exactly is included? We don’t know and Google won’t say. • Calls into question content providers, i.e. how does Google define “scholarly”?• Good for “casual” research, but not acceptable as a single source for coverage of the literature on a topic. • Coverage is unknown • Relevancy Ranking of search results is questionable • Narrowing/sorting search results is rudimentary • No controlled vocabulary • Citations may be inaccurate due to reliance of web crawling extraction (e.g. Author Name: P Login) Jacsó, P. Google Scholars ghost authors. Library Journal 134: 26-27.
  • 22. Linking to LRC resources• Go to Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.ca)• Click “Scholar Preferences” in upper right hand of the search page.• On the Scholar Preferences page, in the “Library Links” section, enter for “Conestoga” in the search box and click “Find Library”.• Checkboxes appear below the search box.• Checkmark the Conestoga links.• Scroll to the bottom of the page and click “Save Preferences.” • Your searches will now show links to Conestoga LRC resources that contain articles from your search results.
  • 23. Citing our SourcesIts important to cite sources you used in your research for several reasons: To show your reader youve done proper research by listing sources you used to get your information To be a responsible scholar by giving credit to other researchers and acknowledging their ideas To avoid plagiarism by quoting words and ideas used by other authors To allow your reader to track down the sources you used by citing them accurately in your paper by way of footnotes, a bibliography or reference list
  • 24. Let’s Cite our Sources: Don’t forget to check the style guides to make sure your citation is correct.
  • 25. Need more sources? Explore the “Mechanical Systems Engineering” Research Help Guide to discover Databases focused on Mechanical Engineering.  These database have:  Advanced Search Tools  Subject Specific Material http://exploreguides.conestogac.on.ca/MSE
  • 26. SummaryResearching using the LRC  Use Discovery Search first  www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc  After that, try a relevant Research Help guide for links to even more resources to search  http://exploreguides.conestogac.on.ca/MSE Remember no ‘citation generator’ is ever perfect  Check it manually using the Writing Centre’s resources for your Citations Style.  www.conestogac.on.ca/learningcommons/resources/writing.jsp
  • 27. HELP AT THE A1109LIBRARY  Visit the Service Desk  Email or Phone  Instant Messaging