Innovative design thinking

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Based on my presentation at HP Software's Cupertino Campus Innovation Event in 2011.

Based on my presentation at HP Software's Cupertino Campus Innovation Event in 2011.

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  • Why are we interested in innovation?It’s cool, energizing, funInnovation is the way to win in the marketThe alternative is stagnationIn reality, innovation can be a brilliant flash of inspiration or a creative way to repeatedly produce products which meet user needs.In Silicon Valley, we can cite two successful technology companies with opposite approachesDesign ivory towerOpen collaborative prototyping and adapting
  • Why are we interested in innovation?It’s cool, energizing, funInnovation is the way to win in the marketThe alternative is stagnationIn reality, innovation can be a brilliant flash of inspiration or a creative way to repeatedly produce products which meet user needs.In Silicon Valley, we can cite two successful technology companies with opposite approachesDesign ivory towerOpen collaborative prototyping and adapting
  • IDEO is a top design company which has designed products and services for top companies and government agencies. IDEO is headquartered in Palo Alto and partnered with Stanford to create the d.School.Materials in this presentation are based on public resources from both.
  • The last 5 – 10 years have seen a trend from isolated design groups of artists & designers to cross-functional teams including engineers, folks from business & finance, and psychologists, anthropologists, and human factors specialists. Today, teams are challenged to design more than just form & function – they create processes and experiences for their users... [build slide: Technology determines the feasibility of the idea, the Business team determines viability, and Human Values ensures Usability: interaction design, ease of use & intuitive use; Desirability: does it mean something, does it make their lives better?]Collaboration bridges individual/teamgoals to design products, services, processes. How to build winning products & how to deliver differentiated solutions requires groups of experts who work together.So how do these people with different cultures, biases, goals get along and work together?
  • Individuals as silos of expertise. Domain expertise can be considered more analytical, while design thinking is more synthesis-based.Design thinking is a bridge across these disciplines, and helps to fill in the unexplored innovation spaces which don’t fall neatly into a particular discipline...Bridging engineering and human factors, for example, let’s us deliver a solution with meaning to the user rather than just a gadget.
  • It’s much more effective to engage a user with a picture, prototype, story than just a description. Seek to create something tangible to communicate your idea and spark a discussion. Use a whiteboard, props, gestures to enable discussions.This is hard when you’re sitting face to face – it gets even more challenging to work with folks remotely. But the more visual you can be, the more effective your communications will be.
  • Build a prototype early. It should not be accurate or polished; its purpose is simply to enable a conversation. Iterate rapidly to gather feedback and adapt your design.
  • More important than a breakthrough design is an environment for innovative thinking. In this way, the organization is enabled to repeat successes.
  • Dev, QA, IE, PM...
  • Design thinking is not a passive exercise. It is active and engaging, creating prototypes reaching out to learn and understand.
  • The design process, or design modes, presents a repeatable structure for repeatable success. Each phase has specific goals and methods to achieve these goals. The phases are iterative and not necessarily sequential. The “wallet” design workshop [see references slide] illustrates how this works. The following section in this deck contains details – this is hidden due to allow this deck to be presented in a one hour timeslot.
  • The design thinker will seek to uncover many POV’s; “user” here represents an individual or a user community. These problem statements will define the solution space for subsequent steps: Ideate, Prototype, and Test...
  • Observation: What do users do? How? Why?Question... Pick their brains... Listen... DON’T JUDGE.
  • Problem definition guides the solution space.
  • Iteratively suggest and validation ideas for solutions.
  • Make prototypes highly interactive.Have the users think aloud when exploring prototype.
  • Links to reference material and additional resources.

Transcript

  • 1. Innovative Design Thinking Marion Kumar Based on
  • 2. a flash of inspiration?
  • 3. a repeatable process tomake better products?
  • 4. Innovative Ideas from (just a sample)
  • 5. Collaborative Thinking Technology Feasibility Human Business Values Viability Usability & Desirability
  • 6. Design Thinking Design Thinking Design Thinking Expertise Expertise ExpertiseDesign thinking bridges the disciplines in a cross-functionalteam, and helps to fill in the unexplored innovation spaceswhich don’t fall neatly into a particular discipline...
  • 7. Design Mindsets
  • 8. Show, Don’t TellCommunicate your vision in an impactful andmeaningful way by creating experiences, usingillustrative visuals, and telling good stories.
  • 9. Embrace ExperimentationPrototyping is not simply a way to validate youridea; it is an integral part of your innovationprocess. We build to think and learn.
  • 10. Be Mindful Of ProcessKnow where you are in the designprocess, what methods to use in thatstage, and what your goals are.
  • 11. Radical CollaborationBring together innovators with varied backgroundsand viewpoints. Enable breakthrough insights andsolutions to emerge from the diversity.
  • 12. Focus on Human ValuesEmpathy for the people you are designing forand feedback from these users is fundamentalto good design.
  • 13. Bias Toward ActionDesign thinking is a misnomer; it is more aboutdoing than thinking. Bias toward doing andmaking, over thinking and meeting.
  • 14. Design Process
  • 15. Point of ViewPOV = user + need + insight
  • 16. Design Modes
  • 17. Empathize Define Ideate Prototype Test EmpathizeEmpathy is the foundation of a human-centered design process. Toempathize, we:- Observe. View users and their behavior in the context of their lives.- Engage. Interact with and interview users through both scheduledand short ‘intercept’ encounters. Encourage stories.- Immerse. Experience what your user experiences.
  • 18. Empathize Define Ideate Prototype Test DefineDefinition provides a Point of View:• Provides focus and frames the problem in an actionable way• Inspires your team• Provides a reference for evaluating competing ideas• Empowers your team to make decisions independently in parallel• Captures the hearts and minds of people you meet• Is something you revisit and reformulate as you learn by doing• Guides your innovation efforts.
  • 19. Empathize Define Ideate Prototype Test IdeateThis mode transitions from identifying problems into exploringsolutions. This is a mode of “flaring” rather than “focus” to broadenthe solution set.
  • 20. Empathize Define Ideate Prototype Test PrototypePrototyping goes beyond merely testing functionality:• Empathy gaining: Prototyping is a tool to deepen understanding ofthe design space and user, even at a pre-solution phase of a project.• Exploration: Build to think. Develop multiple solution options.• Testing: Create prototypes (and develop the context) to test andrefine solutions with users.• Inspiration: Inspire others(teammates, clients, customers, investors) by showing your vision.
  • 21. Empathize Define Ideate Prototype Test TestTo refine our prototypes and solutions. Testing informs the nextiterations of prototypes. Sometimes this means going back to thedrawing board.To learn more about our user. Testing is another opportunity tobuild empathy through observation and engagement—it often yieldsunexpected insights.To test and refine our POV. Sometimes testing reveals that not onlydid we not get the solution right, but also that we failed to frame theproblem correctly.
  • 22. ReferencesDesign & innovation guide from Stanford d.Schoolhttp://dschool.typepad.com/files/bootcampbootleg2010.pdfHarvard Business Review article reprinthttp://www.ideo.com/images/uploads/thoughts/IDEO_HBR_Design_Thinking.pdfStanford d.School workshop guidehttps://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/wiki/ae1bc/attachments/1e5f4/Wallet%20Facilitators%20Guide.pdfArticle on design workspaceshttp://www.fastcompany.com/1638692/11-ways-you-can-make-your-space-as-collaborative-as-the-dschool