SPACE FOR SERVICES-PRESENTATION TO ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

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More and more, space can be considered a platform for dynamic experiences, not a just a static container. How can designers prepare to design spaces that empower a more mobile, personal and participatory experience?

These was the question I posed to the students at the beginning of our half-day workshop at the gradate school of architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, MO. The workshop introduced students to ‘service design’ methodologies and ‘user experience’ tools and techniques as a way to consider designing an experience from the point of view of the user, rather then a form or a space from the point of view of the designer.

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SPACE FOR SERVICES-PRESENTATION TO ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

  1. 1. /THESPACE OF SERVICESCARING PLACES:New Architectural ConsiderationsFor the care of those affected by cancerWashington University Studio | SnøhettaInfusion Center, unkown Infusion Center, MSK Cancer Center, Brooklyn, NY 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  2. 2. /THESPACE OF SERVICESWHAT DOES A GOOD SERVICE LOOK LIKE?radio shack apple store 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  3. 3. /THESPACE OF SERVICESFour shifts have occurred which are changingthe role of designers: what and how theyought to design and for/with whom 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  4. 4. mobility • New patterns of use • Connectivity across locations • New time/space conventions • Abundant and mobile devices participation • Social production • Mass collaboration • DIY making • Authority/authorshippersonalization• Identity• Mass customization sharing • From ownership to membership • Community • Sustainability © copyright 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  5. 5. To respond to these shifts, the job of the designermoves from delivering something people use tocontinuously supporting use, employing designstrategy to meet user needs and business goals andto assess and refine design in an ongoing way. DESIGN AS SUPPORT delivery support Design as an end Design as a means © copyright 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  6. 6. Rather than thinking of space as a container, think ofit as a system of services designed to support peopleand activities which create experiences. SPACE AS PLATFORM container services Design information, Design Experiences objects and spaces © copyright 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  7. 7. Thinking of space as a system of services meansidentifying the different types of services anddesigning the interactions among people, objects,information, technology, services, and space.HOSTING A SYSTEMEntering Locating Hosting• Ticketing • Finding others • Introductions• Coat/Bag Check • Finding resources • Concierge• Orientation • Circulating/traveling • Training/Orientation• Security • Food Think about the last timeAdvising Facilitating Capturing you were at a party with• Consulting • Planning/organizing • Monitoring usage• Training • Guiding/prompting • Documenting activity a great host. The host• Demonstrating • Questioning • Displaying use welcomed you, made you feel comfortable, showed you around, introduced you to other guests, maybeConnecting Sharing Exchanging encouraged you to try a new food, and made sure you had a• Network connectivity • Scheduling • Goods• AV conferencing • Accessing • Services good time. Hosting is a service• Communicating • Booking • Information that needs to be designed • Coordinating along with the space. © copyright 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  8. 8. Designing space as a system of services meansconsidering a variety of different factors and theirrelationships:DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS • expectations for consistency • hand-offs and adjacencies • visibility • error recovery • level of specialization • schedule/time • use/reuse • degree of assistance • durability • persistence © copyright 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  9. 9. /SERVICE DESIGNACTIVITIES:• body storming• prototyping 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  10. 10. affinity mapping 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  11. 11. context 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  12. 12. point of view 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  13. 13. enact scenarios 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  14. 14. personify objects 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  15. 15. assign roles 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  16. 16. identify design opportunities 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  17. 17. Storyboard planning 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  18. 18. Storyboard mapping 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  19. 19. Storyboarding 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  20. 20. /SERVICE DESIGNTOOLS:• stakeholder diagram• persona profile• journey mapping• storyboarding 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  21. 21. Stakeholder diagram/Affinity Mapping [stakeholder sub groups] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] ] et [g [g et ] e] iv [g [g iv e] [stakeholder] [organization] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [stakeholder]adapted by Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rule-breakers and changemakersby Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, John Macanufo 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  22. 22. Stakeholder diagram/matrix Mapping low power high power high interest high interest [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [organization] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] [stakeholder] low power high power low interest low interestadapted by Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rule-breakers and changemakersby Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, John Macanufo 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  23. 23. Persona Profile/ NAME: USER TYPE: AGE: BACKGROUND INFO: MOTIVATIONS: VA BEHAVIORS: A LIMITATIONS: TA KEYWORDS: 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  24. 24. Customer Journey Map/ touchpoint activity environment interaction object users BEFORE DURING AFTER 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  25. 25. Storyboarding/ 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  26. 26. /THESPACE OF SERVICESCASE STUDY:hellosmile | hellolab.org Jackson Heights, New York hellosmile, Jackson Heights, NY 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  27. 27. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  28. 28. WHY 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  29. 29. 100children 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  30. 30. 100 50children cavities 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  31. 31. 100 50children cavities (20 kids have 6 or more cavities) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  32. 32. 100 50 cavities 17children obsesity (20 kids have 6 or more cavities) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  33. 33. 100 50 cavities 17 12children obsesityasthma (20 kids have 6 or more cavities) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  34. 34. 100 50 17 12 .25children cavities obsesity asthma diabetes (20 kids have 6 or more cavities) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  35. 35. income level education level 100 50 17 12 .25 diabetes children cavities obsesityasthma (20 kids have 6 or more cavities) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  36. 36. “ The greatest short coming in health care iswe have got the diagnosis wrong, we need totake a step back and see what we are treatingso that we can get to the ROOT cause.We must change the context and createenvironments that encouragehealthier choices” -Thomas Frieden, Director CDC Former commissioner of health NYC 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  37. 37. New York City Bronx pop. 8.2 million pop. 1.38 million We atWhere we started believ child, what he or Harlem, NY pop. 215,700 Ella McQueen deser Queens Boys Center, Harlem, NY qualit Manhattan pop. 2.23 million pop. 1.58 million At hellosmi strengthen Jackson Heights, NY integrity. In Kids Dental pop. 41,600 away from c Jackson Hieghts, NY companies Corona, NY Kids Dental pop. 74,860 Corona, NY Providers th treatment m Sunnyside, NY Kids Dental & Braces shoot great pop. 28,120 Sunnyside, NY hellosmile; Woodside, NY and we leve pop. 88,340 Kids Dental Village margins. Woodside, NY Parkslope, NY pop. 65,050 Parkslope Kids Dnetal & Braces Parkslope, NY 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow Brooklyn
  38. 38. Where we started 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  39. 39. our new approachSERVICEDESIGNTHINKING AS‘SOCIAL GLUE’ 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  40. 40. user-centered 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  41. 41. co-creative 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  42. 42. evidencing 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  43. 43. sequencing 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  44. 44. holistic design 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  45. 45. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  46. 46. systems thinking 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  47. 47. interviews 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  48. 48. observations 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  49. 49. body storming 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  50. 50. prototyping 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  51. 51. our focusRECRUIMENT&RETENTION 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  52. 52. The problem: 2) service experience – in clinic treatment unfriendly inconvienient expensive 1) pre-service experience uncomfortable – marketing & outreach disenchanting genericWHY DON’T culturally insensitivePATIENTSCOME BACK? mis-trustIn a typical clinic, on average disenfranchis-only 20% of patients return ing complicatedfor regular check-ups. under-valued 3) post-service experience – lasting impressions, motivation to return 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  53. 53. Our goal: 2) service experience – in clinic treatment friendly convienient comfortable 1) pre-service experience empowering – marketing & outreach affordable GET memorable PATIENTS TO culturally relevant RETURN valuable sensitive meaningful In order for a preventative care practice to work, rentention of patients is key. The goal is to have 100% of patients return for regular check-ups. 3) post-service experience – lasting impressions, motivation to return 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  54. 54. Our solution:CREATE VALUETHROUGH wowENGAGEMENT team leader HEALTH COACH (mid- level healthcare provider) 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  55. 55. What makes up the“wow!” experience?1. Phone Conversation 2. Outside environment 3. Walking in 4. Warm greeting 5. Forms + passport6. Journey to the chair 7. Assessment 8. Teaching 9. Fond Farewell 10. Word of mouth + treatment conversation –A TRUSTING & COMPASSIONATE RELATIONSHIP where do you start? 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  56. 56. our focusRECRUITLOCALTALENT 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  57. 57. team building from bottom-up,growth & opportunity H L3 DOCTOR L3 HYGIENIST L2 HELLO CERT. L1 CDA CERT. DANB CERT. 3+ years with hellosmile hellosmile curriculum cert. T 400 hours community CARE SPEC. service cert. 240 hours collective leadership cert. TRAINEE 120 hours Successful completion of RDA license NY StateHIGH SCHOOL Successful completion of Community Leadership Program. Successful completion of Dental Assisting National Boards with Certification (2year process). Dental Assiting Certificate or 2 years of Dental Assisting with letter of recommendation from employer 120 hours of hellosmile training. Current enrollment towards GED or High School Equivalent. $8 hr $10+ hr $12+ hr $14+ hr $15+ hr $22+ hr $50+ hr 1 Year 2 Years 2 Years 2 1/2 Years 3 Years 4 1/2 Years 8 Years *LLC CLINICAL LEAD CLINICAL CLINICAL ASSOCIATE ASSOCIATE COORDINATOR* 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  58. 58. teaching and learning strategies BLENDED LEARNING PROGRAMS ONE ON ONE E-LEARNING COACHING/MENTORY HANDS ON LEARNING GROUP LEARNING 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  59. 59. roles and engagement 24 hours 7 days a week | Hablamos español HEALTH COACH Preventive Expert Make an appointment at hellosmile clinic open 7 days a week Request hellosmile oral Health kit Ask insurance and eligibility question Find out about Cavity Free program prizes Schedule a Community Oral health questions Health Workshop Systemic health questions 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  60. 60. our focusREWARDMEMBERSHIP 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  61. 61. The healthcare landscape 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  62. 62. The Passport Incentive ProgramWELCOME ABOARD! BE A PART OF THE CAVITY FREE CLUBHave you received your AND REMEMBER TO BRING YOUR PASSPORT TO EACH DENTAL VISIT.passport today?1 Get your passport 2 1st Visit 3 2nd Visit 4 3rd Visit 5 Get your raffle ticket and 6 And a chance to a complementary gift K E C FL ET TI AF R Make an appointment, Get a stamp and a small giſt at each visit or 2 Once you have 3 stamps Participate for a get your passport and stamps and a bigger reward if you are cavity free. on your passport. Get a chance to win big! a free Health Kit. raffle ticket and a complementary giſt. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  63. 63. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  64. 64. Customer Journey touchpoint activity environment interaction object users Storytime, play Schools/classrooms, call/response, storybook, puppets, kids age 0-6, care-givers, outreach BEFORE games, sing songs daycare, fairs check-ups toys, tooth brushes teachers, volunteers phone call phone call, call center work phone conversation, phone, computer parents/care-givers, introductions station data entry telehealth coach walking in front door lobby of clinic orientation, talking chair, desk, parents/care-givers, enter clinic with receptionist computer lobby receptionist forms filling out forms waiting area of writing on forms laminate forms parents/care-givers lobby on lap have photo taken, photobooth in photoshoot in booth camera, chair, parents/care-givers, kid passport given passport lobby of clinic backdrop, passport health coach DURING x-ray get xray of teeth xray room talking, sitting chair, xray machine parents/care-givers, kid still health coach assessment/ lay back in chair treatment room, taking direction treatment chair, toys kid, health coach needs walls, ceiling from health coach pillows treatments/ treat teeth, talk lobby of clinic distraction games, sunglasses, mirror, parents/care-givers, conversation about teeth toys, visual cues puppets, pamphlet kid, health coach, dentist stamp/ stamp passport, get between chair and pick rewards, reward toys, raffle parents/care-givers, reward small reward lobby stamping tickets, box kid, health coach make next lobby of clinic, or discussion about flyers, appmt card, parents/care-givers, farwell appointment at side kiosk tips for home healthcare products health coach at home brushing reward bathroom/house conversations, toothbrush, games, parents/care-givers, AFTER games, reminders play games rewards, telehealth coach phone-call phone-call, house, or city conversation, phone, calandar, parents/care-givers, follow-up reminders computer telehealth coach 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  65. 65. Customer Experience- in clinic1) ENTER CLINIC • greeted by signage2) INTRODUCTIONS/FORMS 5 • receptionist greeting3) FILL FORMS OUT, PLAY, WAIT • toys, entertainment in lobby relate tohealthy habits, eating4) INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH COACH, 6PASSPORT SYSTEM • highfive health coach 4 • get photo taken in photobooth • get passport, and photo printed • photo pinned up on membership photowall5) JOURNEY TO CHAIR •assessment/ treatment 3 • follow-up healthy eating/habits 2 conversation • Make next appoinment6) REWARDS/ PASSPORT STAMP • balloon or small reward health coach • stamp for coming to check-up • Fond farewell child parent/care-giver 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  66. 66. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  67. 67. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  68. 68. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  69. 69. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow
  70. 70. 02/06/2012 | Washington University Snøhetta Studio | Liz Burow

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