2013 Webinar: Systematic Civic Stewardship: An Organizing Model for Leading Change in the Social Sector

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Cities are becoming the most prominent context for social change in the world today, and they offer exciting opportunities for participative governance. A model of “systematic civic stewardship” …

Cities are becoming the most prominent context for social change in the world today, and they offer exciting opportunities for participative governance. A model of “systematic civic stewardship” frames the city as community-based, action-learning system. Leaders play key roles in neighborhood teams focused on local challenges (graduation rates, health outcomes, etc.), while learning and working with peers via city-wide communities of practice. We have much to learn about learning systems in any context—understanding how they work in communities and cities draws on organization experience and provokes new insights.

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  • Convergence of disciplines with interrelated questions, all relevant to what framed here as SCS:Community-based Change, socio-tech of Cities, social side of civic social media, civic extensions of organization theory, enhancing political theory on civic engagement, social entrepreneurism and social movement models…This is not only convergence of trends, but convergence of questions/puzzles in a number of interrelated domainsSCS is one way to frame…this initiative, at meta-level, is not about SCS itself, so much as SCS as a contribution to a broader, more inclusive, emergent process of more systematically, more participatively, framing a domain and accelerating action-learning about the domain…and having right mix of players involvedProblem is urgent, cannot leverage practices without domain and community…This is classic community-of-practice application…in a sense, we must practice what we preach, organizing for outcome, not merely for promoting a particular discipline or world view, learning in practice, learning from various perspectives and applications, and organizing a community to enhance and accelerate learning, capabilities, innovation, collaboration…and results.Current process classic application of “discovery,” about domain and community. Anticipate initial gatherings as we get critical mass…and in that context, shape framework(s), develop collaborative learning/innovation, to include greenfield action-learning labs as well as accelerated collaboration among current leading efforts.This is a kind of informal institute, structured community…will require investment if gains traction, for now in initial stages to see if there is a “there there”I am playing community entrepreneur…with a skin in game in terms of own perspective, and committed to staying open-minded about perspectives, looking for patterns among us, asking for help to see the emergence, in terms of the issues and people and potential practices and applications….Civic infrastructure for City Design (and re-design)Strengthening and scaling Community Change Initiatives Overlapping development edges of Social Entrepreneurism and “New Social Movements”New approaches to Civic engagement / Participatory DemocracyCivic extensions of Organization TheoryOrganizing aspects of Civic Media ApplicationsOrganizing Civic Shift/Boston means practicing what we preachThe domain is emergent, participation is inclusive, and development is action-learning-oriented… all bound by an ambitious, shared civic purposehttps://www.google.com/search?q=urban+farm+rooftop&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
  • As cities are elements of civilization, so are communities to citiesAnd communities are organizing units between individual and the state—potential for tremendous leverage for shifting society, via individual as well as institutional changeWe have many more tools and methods for doing this—increasing awareness of opportunities and demand to do it…Akin to lever for changing capacity re: production of goods and services by changing design of organization processes, structures, and systems….Need address cultural factors, _and_, need address them at scale.And, by addressing at scale, becomes much clearer what to do about policy.For example, problem of “Great Gatsby Curve” linking economic immobility and inequity; issues are cultural/family, labor market profile (increasing emphasis on knowledge), and “progressive policy” options. But this is a socio-technical mix, and making policy from top-down, without a strong, informed base that understands the dynamics, and can leverage policy and concomitantly advocate in labor market (classic civil society action) (or better, create its own labor markets…localism, cooperatism, etc.)…then unlikely to get scalable, sustained breakthrough results.
  • Need address cultural factors, _and_, need address them at scale.And, by addressing at scale, becomes much clearer what to do about policy.For example, problem of “Great Gatsby Curve” linking economic immobility and inequity; issues are cultural/family, labor market profile (increasing emphasis on knowledge), and “progressive policy” options. But this is a socio-technical mix, and making policy from top-down, without a strong, informed base that understands the dynamics, and can leverage policy and concomitantly advocate in labor market (classic civil society action) (or better, create its own labor markets…localism, cooperatism, etc.)…then unlikely to get scalable, sustained breakthrough results.We spend several billion a year on heart research, and increased lifespan over last 50 years, about 8 years, is mostly due to advances in cardio-vascular, but nearly all of this is via changes in habits related to smoking and exercise, etc.—yet perhaps less than 1% of research is spent on ways to influence cohort norms.Sampson: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/G/bo5514383.html
  • Collaboration _Tools*ResultsModel uses Development Human and Development EnvironmentNext steps? Page before Action planMonetization figure?
  • ADD: what about _community_ makes it a compelling microcosm for all society? Yes, because nexus of other communities, and collective purpose that is _visible_...and it’s a nexus because overlap in one place where you _run into people_...physically or virtual site (which all communities should have)…Also: sense of being a microcosm population that adds up to the city, and increased responsibility because of that; places makes participation easier, and more visible (motivation, sanction; recognition); opportunities for kids and friends—i.e., lots of ways proximal participation can redound for benefits in other identities; close connection of cause and effect…Reason for place not so external players can see whether their interventions work…need be really clear about theory of change…what is the opportunity in place communities, in order to design to leverage those opportunities. See also pp. 1-11 in 12.12.12 (or near there) version of slides.Add faith to list.Consultants in neighborhood who ask: what could we do here?Investment bankers form robin hood community in nycGardeners ask how help a _community garden_?Local artists…Face-blocksEtc.Place identity is strengthened by various types of community affiliations (friendship, hobby, kids, faith, vocation, ethnicity, etc.).Social capital increases via various affiliations, but this does not necessarily improve civic outcomes (health, safety, etc.).Collective efficacy reflects shared commitments to improve community wellbeing, via informal actions or structured teams.Collective efficacy and social capital are mutually reinforcing: Stewardship teams leverage local social capital to achieve neighborhood goals.¹
  • An integrative approach overcomes limits of top-down and bottom-up strategies via inter-level and inter-local engagementInstitutional focusEfforts to foster multi-stakeholder coalitions target focal issues and leverage inter-organizational resources for “collective impact”Without a crisis, however, the impetus for collaboration is often too weak to coalesce and sustain active participation Deep change requires involvement of grassroots groups that can shift cultural norms via community influenceIn areas such as healthcare, the majority of institutional efforts fail to achieve objectives¹Also inter-disciplinary, multi-stakeholders, and comprehensive in terms of issues, but these characteristics are less distinctive than the inter-level and inter-local features of the Civic Shift model.http://www.ssireview.org/blog/entry/channeling_change_making_collective_impact_work?cpgn=WP%20DL%20-%20Channeling%20Changehttp://www.aspeninstitute.org/policy-work/community-change
  • Community Change: SCS includes all types of neighborhoods (vs. primarily distressed ones); organized by civic practices (versus projects); in a multi-level system (vs. single community) City-Building: SCS focus is civic infrastructure (vs. built environment)Civic Engagement: Participants are engaged in a multi-level system that addresses the full array of civic issues, within and across cities (vs. focus on political activities or more isolated initiatives)Collective Impact: SCS places equal emphasis on fostering and interweaving civic groups at neighborhood and inter-local levels (vs. primary focus on integrating organizational efforts) Contrasts are highlighted to point out distinctive aspects of SCS; in fact, there is much overlap & complementarity among all these approaches. For more on similarities & distinctions, see p. 28.
  • Emerging mindset and socio-technical methods respond to growing demands of the new urban ageWe can draw on a deep and diverse repertoire of methods whose efficacy has been proven by successful organizations. Now it is time to apply these for breakthrough results in the civic sector.¹ ¹There is much to learn; after all, in the U.S. alone, tens of billions are spent annually for research, consulting, and education to support business development. Meanwhile, there are over 1 million non-profits in the U.S., most of which struggle to set and achieve measurable goals; or to collaborate on shared missions.“Cities rather than states are becoming the islands of governance on which the future world order will be built.” -- Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative, Foreign Policy, 2010Also: https://www.rblock.com/ ; www.goodneighbors.net ; www.civiclab.us; Hey neighbor: http://heyneighbor.com/pages/homeDropout rates, healthcare, economy, education all breakthroughs…Peace and justice break out everywhere…Democracy is thriving worldwide…We are at a convergence point…an opportunity to renew democracy…And we need it…Combination of context and capabilitiesContextStalemateForces at workPower of citiesCapabilitiesSocialTechnicalMindsetThere are new opportunities for adding both participation and expertise….By organizing better, we can shift our stewardship capacity for achieving quantum advances in results
  • Civic engagement and economy: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-levine/could-civic-engagement-be_b_966176.htmllocal fairs: http://www.iptv.org/iowajournal/story.cfm/76/featureArts fairs: http://www.artsusa.org/pdf/information_services/research/services/economic_impact/aepiv/AEP4_NationalSummaryReport.pdfConditions include:Community commitment to improve local, population-based outcomesShared values & practices for civic stewardship (e.g., learning and connecting with others)Systems for measurement, monetization & communicationCapacity for collective advocacyInteroperable local structures (e.g., stewardship teams and communities of practice) for collaborating city-wide & beyond
  • Collaboration _T_ools*ResultsModel uses Development Human and Development EnvironmentNext steps? Page before Action planMonetization figure?
  • Example of organizing that uses both good and bad cop approaches: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/02/magazine/how-chicagos-housing-crisis-ignited-a-new-form-of-activism.html?pagewanted=all
  • Consultants in neighborhood who ask: what could we do here?Investment bankers form robin hood community in nycGardeners ask how help a _community garden_?Local artists…Face-blocksEtc.Place identity is strengthened by various types of community affiliations (friendship, hobby, kids, faith, vocation, ethnicity, etc.).Social capital increases via various affiliations, but this does not necessarily improve civic outcomes (health, safety, etc.).Collective efficacy reflects shared commitments to improve community wellbeing, via informal actions or structured teams.Collective efficacy and social capital are mutually reinforcing: Stewardship teams leverage local social capital to achieve neighborhood goals.¹

Transcript

  • 1. Civic Shift: Action-Learning Lab for Systematic CivicStewardship (SCS)Cultivating transformativecommunities and cities forlocal & global well-being…11LLC Webinar – June 3, 2013© 2012 William M. Snyder / wsnyder@socialcapital.com / worlddesign.orgworld design, world design, world designLink to expanded version
  • 2. 2SCS Vision: Transform cities to transform the world2*Parag Khanna, Director Global Governance Initiative, Foreign Policy, 2010“The age of nations is over: Thenew urban age has begun.”…get cities right, and we canget the world right.•Half the world lives incities; 70% by 2050•Top 100 U.S. citiesaccount for 75% of GDP;the top 100 cities in theworld generate nearly40% of global GDP•Cities over 50,000 pop.generate 70% of carbonemissions•Cultural product of theworld is created primarilyby people in citiesCities are intricatelyinterwoven webs ofcommunities, and ourglobal civilization isbound together by avital network of cities.
  • 3. Communities shape identity and foster sense of sharedpurpose3In recent years, we have increased considerably our capacity to cultivatecommunities in all areas of our lives—private, professional, and public"Whatever happens tothe individual happens tothe whole group, andwhatever happens to thewhole group happens tothe individual.The individual can onlysay: I am, because weare and since we are,therefore I am.‘*John S. Mbiti (African Religions and Philosophy, 1990), regarding the principle of UbuntuCommunities of placecan be framed ascommunities of purposethat foster both personaland civic well-being.
  • 4. Evidence our current governance system is not workingSince the 1970’s, despite our best efforts via policy, technology and free-marketforces, societal problems persist and unprecedented ones are emergingCultureAn exception thatproves the rule?HealthU.S. health costs ~15%of GDP and risingTransportationCommuting time up10% from 1980-2010EnergyCost of carbon-based energyabout $2 trillion/year in 2100Public SafetyCrime rate unchangedincarceration rate is400% higherInfrastructureU.S. infrastructuredegraded from “C”grade in 1988 to “D”grade in 2009Education~25% drop-out rate inU.S. since 1970’sHousing20% in U.S. lack safe,affordable housingEconomyPoverty 12+% since the 1970’sEnvironmentLoss of biodiversity throughmass extinctions (40% of40,000)RecreationU.S. kids spend average of7.5 hours watching screensCivic EngagementReduced levels of socialcapital and public trustSocial EquityPersistent racial and ethnicdisparities in health, income,education outcomes4
  • 5. Societal forces undermine the efficacy of conventionalsolutionsCommunities are fundamental contexts for solving persistent problems5⁴What Does Obama Really Believe In?, New York Times, August 15, 2012, p. 9
  • 6. Neighborhood residents take ownership for localoutcomesNeighborhood opportunities for improving resultsEnergy: Shift household practices; use energy-savingappliances & building materials,and sustainable energy devicesPublic Safety: Build social cohesion (e.g., by increasing the number of residents who know their neighbors)Infrastructure: Changes in design & practices to enhance functions: water, roads, sewage, transport & InternetEnvironment: Conservation, recycling, planting trees, and establishing community parksEconomy: Community networks & local businesses to help residents find jobs, build skills & create & fund start-upsEducation: Encourage and enhance parental involvement to help kids learn at home and schoolHousing: Inform resident decisions about size, design, and density, buy/rent and financing optionsTransportation: Increase use of carpooling, public transit, bikes, and walkingRecreation: Groups for dance and sports to encourage participation & enjoyment; turn vacant lots into playing fieldsCulture: Organize events to spotlight local talent and encourage participation in culture-making for well-beingHealth: Increase cancer screening rates for early detection and treatment; walking groups; community gardens*A blog post (4/25/2012) at E-Democracy.org lists ways technology can enhance neighborhood-level initiatives. 6
  • 7. Neighborhood stewardship teams lead communityproblem-solving to improve civic outcomesFrame Challenge•What is the problem or opportunity?•What purpose are we striving to achieve?•How is it seen differently by diverse players?Design Solution•What are ways tosolve the problem?•What are bestpractices; proventools and methods?•Who to engage?Adaptive Action•What adjustments are needed?•How are conditions changing?•What are critical skills, methods, resources?Evaluate & DiffuseDid we achieve ourgoal?•Lessons learned?•Implications forsustaining anddisseminating?Residents work with health-care experts anddetermine that screening & early treatment forbreast, cervical & colon cancers is a ripe area forimproving neighborhood health outcomes.Residents increasescreening rates andtreatment by 20%;will heal thousandsand save millions innext decades; still,room to improve….They gather data onresults, analyze keyfactors (e.g., self-carenorms); designoutreach initiative;argue for more clinicaccess.Engage doctors’ offices, schools, and businesses(such as beauty salons, pharmacies, and fitnesscenters) to promote awareness; city agency andhealth clinics change policies that increase accessto screening and treatment services.7ParticipativeAction-learningProcessesIllustrative¹¹Healthcare reference case in Medical Care, 2008: pp. S74-S83.
  • 8. Guiding and motivating community change via provenmethods8Goals and achievements for Diamond District neighborhoods in San Diego – Village at Market Creek• Compelling, shared goals• Valid measures of results• Expectation that effort will improve results (access to skills, resources & influence)* Goal theory and Expectancy Theory are two highly validated behavioral theories that have been widely applied in organization contexts, with muchsuccess. (Expectancy theory builds on goal theory, adding emphasis on participants’ expectation that actions will lead to results, influenced byperceived access to opportunities, support, and resources. The importance of perception is consistent with key element of Collective Efficacy , whichargues that communities with expectations of control (“willingness to intervene’) over local conditions perform better than similar neighborhoods onhealth, safety, and other outcomes.) We have new opportunities now to apply related motivational tools and methods at the neighborhood level,given increasing access to population-based information and the growing use of civic indicators (in areas such as health, housing, education, etc.).
  • 9. 9Stewardship teams help various types of communities contribute toneighborhood wellbeingTeams steward neighborhoods as communities of purposeNeighborhood as a Community of PurposeCollectiveWellbeing• Local gardeners and “foodies” organize acommunity vegetable garden.• Social media mavens develop a marketingapplication to help neighborhoodbusinesses respond to local needs.• Parents organize a “play and learn” groupfor young kids.• Faith-based groups join efforts topromote sustainable energy practices.FriendsEthnicitiesVocationsHobbiesFace blocksFamiliesFaithsKeyVarious community types(friends, faith, vocation, etc.)Stewardship teams focused onimproving a civic outcome(health, education, safety, etc.)Neighborhood boundary
  • 10. Communities of place and practice build accountability andcapability10Neighborhood teams focus on achieving defined civic goals (e.g., reducing carbon-based energy use),while members of communities of practice share insights, skills & resources city-wide
  • 11. Communities of practice build capabilities acrossneighborhoodsCategory/NeighborhoodRoxbury Fenway Jamaica Plain South EndResults*• 30% colectoral screening(+5%)• 40% early treatment(+10%)• 40% colectoral screening(+0%)• 60% early treatment(+5%)• 45% colectoralscreening (+5%)• 50% early treatment(+0%)• 50% colectoralscreening (+5%)• 60% early treatment(+5%)Initiatives• Resident outreach• Organization networking• City policy advocacy• Recruit doctor clinics• Recruit doctor clinics• Hospital access advocacy• Public awarenessResident outreach• City policy advocacy• Public awareness• Resident outreach• City policy advocacy• Recruit doctor clinics• Hospital accessadvocacyParticipants• 50/5000 residents• 5/30 local organizations• City health department• Health center• Cancer Society• YMCA/YWCA• 20/6000 residents• 4/40 local organizations• City health department• Doctors offices• Hospital• 60/8000 residents• 7/50 localorganizations• City healthdepartment• Cancer Society• Hospital• 50/5000 residents• 10/50 localorganizations• City health department• Doctors offices• Hospital11Healthcare Illustration*Comparing results and related practices helps neighborhood teams see opportunities forimproving local outcomes and for working together city-wide on policies and programs*This illustrative mini-case draws on a government-sponsored effort, with teams based in 4 different cities, described in Medical Care, 2008: pp. S74-S83.These results (and related activities & participants) are illustrative, not actual. U.S. 2020 goal for and colectoral is 70%; average in 2010 was 40% .
  • 12. Communities of practice build & share knowledge, organizecollective action, and scale impact12Source : Communities of Practice, Snyder & Briggs, 2003, pp. 13-16An ecology of activities—formal and informal, face-to-face and virtual, at variousfrequencies--builds capabilities and relationships
  • 13. Civic communities of practice: Integrating grassroots andgrasstops13Institutional focusNeighborhood focusCivic Stewardship Communitiesof PracticeIntegrative structures foraction-learning:•Inter-level: Institutions andResidents•Inter-local: Residents andorganizations across NeighborhoodsWe know collaboration is essential for achieving breakthrough results,but doing it via institutions or neighborhoods alone is problematic.Grassroots grow upgaining capabilities andfocused on resultsGrasstops get rootedvia communities of practicewith local participation
  • 14. MonetizationMeasuresMethods14The multi-dimensional structure integrates and animates a civic stewardship systemMulti-DimensionalStructureMediaLeadership development Environment design• Neighborhood Stewardship Teams• Civic Communities of Practice• SCS Meta-CommunityPrinciplesPurposeSCS Model components & related capabilitiesComponents of the SCS model enhance civic stewardshipcapabilities
  • 15. Why now? Burgeoning array of civic stewardship tools andmethodsNew capacity forcollaborative learningand actionMedia•SeeClickFix•E-Democracy.org•Neighborland•Neighbors for Neighbors•Goodneighbors•Nextdoor•Blockboard•ChangebyUs•City 2.0•New Urban Mechanics•Code for America•MIT Civic Media lab•Climate Lab15Methods(Social & Technical)•Open Living Labs•Societal ”fixes” blog•Harvard Innovation lab• 21st Century Town Meetings• Study Circles• Public workshops• City-design charettes (case)• Heart and Soul Comm. Plan• Community PlanIt• Future Search• Open Space•Behavioral green policy•Behavioral science politicsPromoting civic shiftsfor societal well-being•Washington DC data•San Francisco data•Chicago crime data•Charlotte civic results•Cincinnati educ. Data•BostonCivicIndicators•Somerville WellbeingMeasures• Social entrepreneurs• New social movements• Participative democracy• Government gridlock• Virtual communities• Worldwide urbanization• Collective Impact networks• Communities of practiceMillennialMindset•Social Impact Bonds(Examples)•Community funding•Sharing economy•Community sharesMonetization* The lists of methods, measures, etc. provide representative examples of a growing array. For example, regarding participatory methods, a slide presentationon best practices for community-organizing mentions hundreds of them, and there are over 150 on dialogue and deliberation alone (see NCDD list).
  • 16. 16Civic Media examples•SeeClickFix•New Urban Mechanics•E-Democracy.org•Neighborland•Neighborsfor Neighbors•Goodneighbors•Nextdoor•Blockboard•ChangebyUs•City 2.0•MIT Civic Media lab•Climate LabCivic media application – Cambridge Neighborhood listserv
  • 17. Civic data creates opportunities for goal setting and innovation17•Washington DC data•San Francisco data•Chicago crime data•Charlotte civic results•Cincinnati educ. data
  • 18. Civic Stewardship creates new “community economy”opportunities18Community identity and social trust foster the success of local groups and organizations, whichin turn, further strengthen a community’s sense of collective efficacy and shared purpose²• Share goods, skills, and knowledge viacooperative methods.• Create new income opportunities via localpurchasing power, business incubators,microloans, community shares, arts fairs,neighborhood investments, etc.• Leverage investments in institutionalpolicies and programs via participation inplanning, budgeting, continuousimprovement, and provision (e.g.,preferences for local vendors).Government costs at neighborhood levelInformal economy opportunityLocal economy opportunityKeyLeverage $90mCapture $10mCreate $10mShare $5mCommunity Economy Opportunities• Capture a percentage of savings in governmentexpenditures by monetizing civic gains—e.g.,healthcare via accountable care organizationsand safety via social impact bonds).NeighborhoodfundraisingfordogparkHowsocialimpactbondswork(Source)
  • 19. Ecology of leadership functions19Community leader foroverall coordination relatedto a civic practiceThought leader toprovide expertise andcredibilityNetworker for linkingacross personal networksand organization or practiceboundariesEvangelist torecruit interest andsupportSponsor forlegitimacy, influenceand political coverBroker to combinecomplementary constituenciesand capabilities—e.g., businessand science; idea generation andimplementationConnector to linkkey players—withinand across groupsEvent organizer topull people togetherand catalyzecommunityProject leader toorganize projects anddrive for resultsSource: “Organizing for Economic Development in Chicago,” 2001, W.M. Snyder
  • 20. Guiding principles and purposes for transformational civicstewardshipSCS promotes the practice of universal principles for shared purposesLearning about the issues andinnovative solutions…even whenthese challenge long-held basicassumptionsAligning to shared goals forthe greater good…even as thevision evolves based on newexperiences and insightsBuilding civic capacity toimprove results in terms ofstrength, scale, scope, andsustainabilityAchieving results in targetedareas (health, education, etc.)Becoming more conscious,loving members of interwoven,transformational communities, forcurrent and future generations¹Connecting with diverse othersto build trust and reciprocity…evenwith those who have conflictinginterests and ideologiesPurposesPrinciples¹cf. Martin Luther King’s assertion that “Love is mankind’s most potent weapon for personal and social transformation”20Purposes complement principles, both fundamental…and transformational
  • 21. Design Charettes help organize action-learninglabs21The charette processbegins by engaging acommunity-based team orcoalition, which takes thelead in a public,participative analysis of atargeted outcome.Meta-community provides coaching, system-development, institutional access, and scalingNeighborhood #1 forms design teamto collect and analyze data (re: localoutcomes, priorities, opportunities,assets, etc.) as prep for charettesTarget priority outcome (e.g., reduce human and financial costs of chronic diseases)• Collect and analyze population-level results, influencing factors, segment characteristics, etc.• Talk with outcome-related (e.g., health) experts and relevant organizations to learn aboutimprovement strategies (e.g., screening, prevention, early treatment, etc.)• Connect with process experts about ways to engage residents and stakeholders in participativeproblem-solving and collective actionNeighborhood #2forms design team…Neighborhood #3Forms design team…Healthcare stewardship teamcontinues action-learningefforts for improved resultsNeighborhood#3 stewardshipteamEngage participants via charettes, conversations, surveys, public dialogues, pilot projects, etc.:How can we best discover and apply solutions in our community for breakthrough results?Action-Learning LabCommunities of PracticeNeighborhoodsMeta-communityNeighborhood#2 stewardshipteamCommunity of practice promotes learning, innovation, and collaboration across localitiesParticipation methods Monetization LeadershipSocial media MeasuresHealth StrategiesDesign CharetteActivities*See Civic Shift proposal
  • 22. How is SCS distinctive as an organizing approach?22•Oppositional organizing against injustice (collective action, typically to address exploitiveor ineffectual institutions and policies, cf. Rules for Radicals)•Ad hoc organizing (informal groups focused on areas of interest)•Comprehensive community initiatives (CCIs) (explicit goals, multiple issues, residentparticipation, typically externally initiated and managed)•Systematic civic stewardship (local ownership for measurable goals, synergistic array ofmethods, inter-local collaboration, continuous action-learning)**Systematic civic stewardship also applies elements of other approaches, including collective action, informal organizing, andstrategies that address interdependencies across issues (i.e., “comprehensive”).
  • 23. 23Meta-Community fosters systematic civic stewardship city-wideCollectiveWellbeingMeta-community functions• Support systematic stewardship in neighborhoods• Replicate and interweave SCS efforts across localities• Engage and influence institutions• Build the discipline and lead a global social movement
  • 24. “By makingcommunities of ourcities we take a giantstride toward worldcommunity, and in theend lasting peace willcome when…worldcommunity has beenachieved.”-- Lawrence Hayworth,The Good CityFacebookinteractionsacrosscitiesworldwide(Source) Systematic civic stewardship can promote well-beingworldwidePhotosfromHighLine(NYC)website24Practicing civic stewardship transforms us as we transform the world…