Outside the ‘In’ Group  Group Treatment forSocially Rejected Children
Of all the psychotherapeutic modalities, grouptherapy, in particular, complements the normaldevelopmental tasks that furth...
Questions to ConsiderIs this the right patient for the group?Is this the right group for this patient?Is this the right ti...
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and   reflect.
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and   reflect.
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and   reflect.2. The ca...
Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and   reflect.2. The ca...
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.     4. The ability to take responsibility for
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.     4. The ability to take responsibility for        one’s actions
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.     4. The ability to take responsibility for        one’s actions
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.     4. The ability to take responsibility for        one’s actions     ...
3. The ability to give and receive       feedback.     4. The ability to take responsibility for        one’s actions     ...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning                      Braswell and Bloomquist
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving                          Braswe...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinkin...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinkin...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinkin...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinkin...
Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinkin...
THE GROUP MODEL
Framework for the Group Work Program                                  Malekoff, 1997
Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence                                     Malekoff, 1997
Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging                   ...
Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging3. Promoting self-d...
Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging3. Promoting self-d...
Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this model
Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this modelContent is what members are talkingabout, the subject of the pr...
Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this modelContent is what members are talkingabout, the subject of the pr...
I. Communication Skills
I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective Taking
I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management
I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustra...
I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustra...
I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustra...
I. Communication Skills II. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management IV. Anger / Frust...
I. Communication Skills  II. Interpersonal Perspective Taking III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management IV. Anger / Fru...
Feelings Detective Badges
How to be a good friend…
How to be a good friend…
Limits are set
Limits are set
Individual and Group goals
Individual and Group goals  These are formulated by way of:       1. observation       2. discussion       3. peer feedback
Individual and Group goals  These are formulated by way of:       1. observation       2. discussion       3. peer feedbac...
Pizza Chart
Pizza Chart
I. Communication Skills
I. Communication Skills
ArtistAnna Dibble
ArtistAnna Dibble
Starting aConversation
Keeping aConversation   Going
Ending aConversation
Feeling Charades
Feeling CharadesWithout using words, show the group that you are SAD.Without using words, show the group that you are CALM...
Phone Skills1.   Introduce yourself.2.   Ask to speak with your friend.3.   Ask “What’s up?” or “How are you?”4.   Ask to ...
II. Interpersonal Perspective Taking
1. What is the problem?
1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?
1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits   (plusses) and costs (m...
1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits   (plusses) and costs (m...
1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits   (plusses) and costs (m...
1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits   (plusses) and costs (m...
feelings
feelings
thoughts
thoughts
III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings          Management
III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings          Management
IV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance
What makes you angry?  How do you know when you’re angry?
What makes you angry?  How do you know when you’re angry?
Source:There Is A Volcano In MYTummy
Source:There Is A Volcano In MYTummy
Anger / Frustration Management             Chart        (Braswell & Bloomquist)
Anger / Frustration Management                  Chart                   (Braswell & Bloomquist)Response:   AGGRESSIVE     ...
V. Teasing / Bullying
Feeling Chair Exercise
Feeling Chair ExerciseDear XXXX,  I feel               when you       .  I wish you would                    .XXXX,Name
Cyber Bullying
Cyber Bullying• Block Mean Messages• Adjust the Privacy Settings• Report the Person
BRAVERY AWARD Presented    to
BRAVERY AWARD Presented    to
VI. Being a Good Sport
Being a Good Sport
Being a Good Sport
Being a Good Sport
Being a Good SportThink of what you can honestly tell the other players:               “Congratulations!”            “You ...
VII. Staying Focused
VII. Staying Focused
What’s the HEADLINE?What are the THREE FACTS you want to share most?What were the REACTIONS of people in the story?How can...
(adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,”           Markman, et al., 1994)
Speaker / Listener Rules                    (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,”                               Mark...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker   • Shares an experience that made them feel...   • Must describe experience, including th...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker    • Shares an experience that made them feel...    • Must describe experience, including ...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker    • Shares an experience that made them feel...    • Must describe experience, including ...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker    • Shares an experience that made them feel...    • Must describe experience, including ...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker    • Shares an experience that made them feel...    • Must describe experience, including ...
Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker    • Shares an experience that made them feel...    • Must describe experience, including ...
VIII. Self Awareness
What is a Group?1. A group is defined by its task or function.Without this task focus, it is just a collectionof individua...
Metaphors for a Group‘Frame’ (Milner)  ‘Holding environment’ (Winnicott)’      ‘Container’ (Bion)        ‘Envelope’ (Day) ...
Targeted Skills1. Being able to enter a group2. Being able to begin, sustain and end a conversation3. Being a good listene...
Targeted Skills6. Picking up social cues and responding appropriately to them.7. Becoming appropriately assertive,   and u...
Why Group Therapy?To enhance social skillsTo improve relationshipsTo decrease loneliness and isolationTo learn to deal mor...
TOP SECRETDETECTIVES … HERE IS YOUR MISSION …                          IF YOU CHOOSE TO ACCEPT IT…1. Never leave evidence ...
TOP SECRET5.   No detective works completely on his own.     You will need to ask for help along the way.     Go to Dr. [s...
Communicate Straight Chart Being non-assertive means: Avoiding saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• Because you...
Name                                                DateNON-ASSERTION, AGGRESSION AND ASSERTION WORKSHEET        1. I hate...
Communicate Straight Chart Being assertive means: Saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• In ways that don’t damag...
Communicate Straight Chart Being aggressive means: Saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• In ways that deny anoth...
Tell us Quickly and Concisely!Ever notice how hard it is to keep your audiences attentionwhen you have a lot to say? Most ...
Advertisement for MyselfFriendly                                    Here are some words which describe           Kind     ...
Social rejects nyc keynote
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  • Social rejects nyc keynote

    1. 1. Outside the ‘In’ Group Group Treatment forSocially Rejected Children
    2. 2. Of all the psychotherapeutic modalities, grouptherapy, in particular, complements the normaldevelopmental tasks that further children’scapacities for social interaction and intimacy.(Schaefer, 1999)It provides an in vivo laboratory where newskills can be practiced under the watchfuleyes of clinicians who can intervene to helpthe children change old patterns ofdysfunctional behavior.
    3. 3. Questions to ConsiderIs this the right patient for the group?Is this the right group for this patient?Is this the right time for this person to join the group?
    4. 4. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:
    5. 5. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and
    6. 6. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and reflect.
    7. 7. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and reflect.
    8. 8. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and reflect.2. The capacity to be flexible and
    9. 9. Abilities children/adolescents lack when they first enter the group:1. The ability to self observe and reflect.2. The capacity to be flexible and to take on a variety of roles
    10. 10. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback.
    11. 11. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback.
    12. 12. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback. 4. The ability to take responsibility for
    13. 13. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback. 4. The ability to take responsibility for one’s actions
    14. 14. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback. 4. The ability to take responsibility for one’s actions
    15. 15. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback. 4. The ability to take responsibility for one’s actions 5. The ability to put oneself in another’s
    16. 16. 3. The ability to give and receive feedback. 4. The ability to take responsibility for one’s actions 5. The ability to put oneself in another’s “shoes” (empathic capacity).
    17. 17. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning Braswell and Bloomquist
    18. 18. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving Braswell and Bloomquist
    19. 19. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinking Braswell and Bloomquist
    20. 20. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinking3. Deficits in perspective taking Braswell and Bloomquist
    21. 21. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinking3. Deficits in perspective taking4. Information processing errors Braswell and Bloomquist
    22. 22. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinking3. Deficits in perspective taking4. Information processing errors A. Misattribution of intent Braswell and Bloomquist
    23. 23. Cognitive Limitations Impacting Social and Group Functioning1. Deficits in problem solving2. Deficits in means-end thinking3. Deficits in perspective taking4. Information processing errors A. Misattribution of intent B. Selective attention and recall Braswell and Bloomquist
    24. 24. THE GROUP MODEL
    25. 25. Framework for the Group Work Program Malekoff, 1997
    26. 26. Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence Malekoff, 1997
    27. 27. Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging Malekoff, 1997
    28. 28. Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging3. Promoting self-discovery, invention, creativity Malekoff, 1997
    29. 29. Framework for the Group Work Program1. Promoting a sense of competence2. Promoting a sense of belonging3. Promoting self-discovery, invention, creativity4. Extending the bonds of belonging beyond the group itself Malekoff, 1997
    30. 30. Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this model
    31. 31. Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this modelContent is what members are talkingabout, the subject of the presentconversation. It usually has a there-and-then focus.
    32. 32. Content and Process are bothactively utilized in this modelContent is what members are talkingabout, the subject of the presentconversation. It usually has a there-and-then focus.Process is the nature of the relationshipamong the group members who arecommunicating with one another. It usuallyhas a here-and-now focus. (Smead, 1995)
    33. 33. I. Communication Skills
    34. 34. I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective Taking
    35. 35. I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management
    36. 36. I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance
    37. 37. I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance V. Teasing / Bullying
    38. 38. I. Communication SkillsII. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings ManagementIV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance V. Teasing / BullyingVI. Being a Good Sport
    39. 39. I. Communication Skills II. Interpersonal Perspective TakingIII. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management IV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance V. Teasing / BullyingVI. Being a Good SportVII. Staying Focused
    40. 40. I. Communication Skills II. Interpersonal Perspective Taking III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management IV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance V. Teasing / Bullying VI. Being a Good SportVII. Staying FocusedVIII. Self-Awareness
    41. 41. Feelings Detective Badges
    42. 42. How to be a good friend…
    43. 43. How to be a good friend…
    44. 44. Limits are set
    45. 45. Limits are set
    46. 46. Individual and Group goals
    47. 47. Individual and Group goals These are formulated by way of: 1. observation 2. discussion 3. peer feedback
    48. 48. Individual and Group goals These are formulated by way of: 1. observation 2. discussion 3. peer feedback Point System Utilized with Rewards
    49. 49. Pizza Chart
    50. 50. Pizza Chart
    51. 51. I. Communication Skills
    52. 52. I. Communication Skills
    53. 53. ArtistAnna Dibble
    54. 54. ArtistAnna Dibble
    55. 55. Starting aConversation
    56. 56. Keeping aConversation Going
    57. 57. Ending aConversation
    58. 58. Feeling Charades
    59. 59. Feeling CharadesWithout using words, show the group that you are SAD.Without using words, show the group that you are CALMor RELAXED.Without using words, show the group that you areFRUSTRATED.Without using words, show the group that you areANXIOUS or NERVOUSWithout using words, show the group that you are HAPPY.Without using words, show the group that you are GRUMPYor CRANKY.
    60. 60. Phone Skills1. Introduce yourself.2. Ask to speak with your friend.3. Ask “What’s up?” or “How are you?”4. Ask to get together for a play-date.5. Decide where to meet (your house or his/her house).6. Decide when to meet (what day and what time).7. Let your parents talk about directions if they will be driving you.
    61. 61. II. Interpersonal Perspective Taking
    62. 62. 1. What is the problem?
    63. 63. 1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?
    64. 64. 1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits (plusses) and costs (minuses) of each one? Which solution seems best?
    65. 65. 1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits (plusses) and costs (minuses) of each one? Which solution seems best?4. Use the solution you picked.
    66. 66. 1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits (plusses) and costs (minuses) of each one? Which solution seems best?4. Use the solution you picked.5. How did it go?
    67. 67. 1. What is the problem?2. What are possible solutions?3. Compare solutions: What are the benefits (plusses) and costs (minuses) of each one? Which solution seems best?4. Use the solution you picked.5. How did it go?
    68. 68. feelings
    69. 69. feelings
    70. 70. thoughts
    71. 71. thoughts
    72. 72. III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management
    73. 73. III. Negative Thoughts / Feelings Management
    74. 74. IV. Anger / Frustration Tolerance
    75. 75. What makes you angry? How do you know when you’re angry?
    76. 76. What makes you angry? How do you know when you’re angry?
    77. 77. Source:There Is A Volcano In MYTummy
    78. 78. Source:There Is A Volcano In MYTummy
    79. 79. Anger / Frustration Management Chart (Braswell & Bloomquist)
    80. 80. Anger / Frustration Management Chart (Braswell & Bloomquist)Response: AGGRESSIVE Assertive PassiveThinking of: (Me only) (Myself and others) (Others only)
    81. 81. V. Teasing / Bullying
    82. 82. Feeling Chair Exercise
    83. 83. Feeling Chair ExerciseDear XXXX, I feel when you . I wish you would .XXXX,Name
    84. 84. Cyber Bullying
    85. 85. Cyber Bullying• Block Mean Messages• Adjust the Privacy Settings• Report the Person
    86. 86. BRAVERY AWARD Presented to
    87. 87. BRAVERY AWARD Presented to
    88. 88. VI. Being a Good Sport
    89. 89. Being a Good Sport
    90. 90. Being a Good Sport
    91. 91. Being a Good Sport
    92. 92. Being a Good SportThink of what you can honestly tell the other players: “Congratulations!” “You played a good game.” “You’re getting real good at this game.”
    93. 93. VII. Staying Focused
    94. 94. VII. Staying Focused
    95. 95. What’s the HEADLINE?What are the THREE FACTS you want to share most?What were the REACTIONS of people in the story?How can you WRAP UP with the story’s MAIN POINT?
    96. 96. (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    97. 97. Speaker / Listener Rules (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    98. 98. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelings (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    99. 99. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelingsListener • Must demonstrate “active listening” by paraphrasing what the speaker said, including the events, the speaker’s thoughts & feelings • Must describe experience, including their thoughts & feelings (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    100. 100. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelingsListener • Must demonstrate “active listening” by paraphrasing what the speaker said, including the events, the speaker’s thoughts & feelings • Must describe experience, including their thoughts & feelingsGroup Members • Act as “Olympic Judges” • Rate Listener (1 - 5) (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    101. 101. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelingsListener • Must demonstrate “active listening” by paraphrasing what the speaker said, including the events, the speaker’s thoughts & feelings • Must describe experience, including their thoughts & feelingsGroup Members • Act as “Olympic Judges” • Rate Listener (1 - 5)Group Leader (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    102. 102. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelingsListener • Must demonstrate “active listening” by paraphrasing what the speaker said, including the events, the speaker’s thoughts & feelings • Must describe experience, including their thoughts & feelingsGroup Members • Act as “Olympic Judges” • Rate Listener (1 - 5)Group Leader • Generate score (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    103. 103. Speaker / Listener RulesSpeaker • Shares an experience that made them feel... • Must describe experience, including their thoughts /feelingsListener • Must demonstrate “active listening” by paraphrasing what the speaker said, including the events, the speaker’s thoughts & feelings • Must describe experience, including their thoughts & feelingsGroup Members • Act as “Olympic Judges” • Rate Listener (1 - 5)Group Leader • Generate score • Leads discussion of contest (adapted from “Fighting for your Marriage,” Markman, et al., 1994)
    104. 104. VIII. Self Awareness
    105. 105. What is a Group?1. A group is defined by its task or function.Without this task focus, it is just a collectionof individuals.2. “A group is a collection of two or moreindividuals, who meet in a face-to-face interactioninterdependently, with the awareness that eachbelongs to the group and for the purpose ofachieving mutually agreed upon goals.” Gladding, 1991
    106. 106. Metaphors for a Group‘Frame’ (Milner) ‘Holding environment’ (Winnicott)’ ‘Container’ (Bion) ‘Envelope’ (Day) ‘Social microcosm’ (Yalom) ‘Laboratory’ (Rutan & Alonso) ‘Garden’ or ‘vineyard’ (Weber) ‘Practice field’ or ‘playground’ (Weber)
    107. 107. Targeted Skills1. Being able to enter a group2. Being able to begin, sustain and end a conversation3. Being a good listener and understanding another’s perspective4. Handling teasing without escalating the situation5. Being a good sport, being able to compromise, and becoming a team player
    108. 108. Targeted Skills6. Picking up social cues and responding appropriately to them.7. Becoming appropriately assertive, and understanding the different being too passive or too aggressive8. Problem solving in interpersonal situations, brainstorming, alternative solutions, and thinking through consequences9. Modulating affect and controlling anger10. Gaining the confidence to try again to make suitable new friends or to repair the relationship with old friends
    109. 109. Why Group Therapy?To enhance social skillsTo improve relationshipsTo decrease loneliness and isolationTo learn to deal more effectively with lossesTo diminish feelings of helplessnessTo enhance self-esteem and self-masteryTo resolve feelings of shameTo confront and change problematic behaviorTo instill hope
    110. 110. TOP SECRETDETECTIVES … HERE IS YOUR MISSION … IF YOU CHOOSE TO ACCEPT IT…1. Never leave evidence behind … Napkins will be needed to help keep crumbs off the table. Go to [receptionist] and ask for napkins. Also find out when her birthday is.2. You will need food along your journey. Go to Mr. [parent] and ask him politely for snack. Also find out what is his favorite food.3. Top detectives remain in control. Seek the wisdom of Dr. [staff] on the second floor. Ask what she does when angry. Do you think it’s a good idea for you?4. You will need to find out the level of importance of this mission - (CODE RED, CODE BLUE, etc.). Go to Ms. [parent] and find out her favorite color. That will be the color of your mission. Be sure to keep it quiet. We don’t anyone to hear, unless he or she is a detective.
    111. 111. TOP SECRET5. No detective works completely on his own. You will need to ask for help along the way. Go to Dr. [staff] on the first floor and find out what he does when it’s hard to ask for help.6. Time is on your side, detective. But we need to keep track of it. Go to Ms. [parent] as her for the group’s timer. How much time is left to complete your mission?7. Your mission is very important. You must discover the hidden message. Ask the receptionist where you can find the room where large meetings take place.8. Decode the message.… YOU HAVE SUCCEEDED. NICE JOB, DETECTIVES !!!!
    112. 112. Communicate Straight Chart Being non-assertive means: Avoiding saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• Because you are afraid to risk the consequences• Because you don’t believe in your own rights• Because you don’t know how to speak up for yourself• Because you think the other person’s rights are more important than yours
    113. 113. Name DateNON-ASSERTION, AGGRESSION AND ASSERTION WORKSHEET 1. I hate your stupid notebook 2. I’d really like to go to a show on Saturday 3. Would you please put your dirty clothes in the hamper after you take a bath? 4. Could you possibly, I mean, maybe, get me a Pepsi? Oh well, you probably don’t want to - that’s OK. 5. Shut up, stupid. 6. I need $5 dollars for the class trip today. 7. I worked really hard on this homework, but I guess I could let you copy it. 8. I want you to pay me the money for babysitting that you owe me. 9. Sure, you can have all of my lunch money. No problem. 10. I’m hurt that I wasn’t invited to the party.
    114. 114. Communicate Straight Chart Being assertive means: Saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• In ways that don’t damage another person’s right to be treated with respect• In a straightforward, non-threatening manner• In ways that don’t deny your own rights
    115. 115. Communicate Straight Chart Being aggressive means: Saying what you think, feel, want or believe -• In ways that deny another person’s right to be treated with respect (anger / meanness / hurtfulness / put-downs / spitefulness, etc.)
    116. 116. Tell us Quickly and Concisely!Ever notice how hard it is to keep your audiences attentionwhen you have a lot to say? Most of us find it hard to keeppeople focused on what we are saying if we talk for a longtime. One way to deal with this is to share informationin a quick and concise manner. • Start with a sentence that grabs a person’s attention • Stick to only the most important facts, and • Wrap it all up with the main point of what you’re saying.An easy way to practice this is to imagine that you work for anewspaper and have to write a short item for the front page.Ask yourself these questions:
    117. 117. Advertisement for MyselfFriendly Here are some words which describe Kind people. Pick out the words Funny which would be the bestDepressed Sensitive Creative Disgusted advertisement Lonely Confused for yourself. Sad SillyProud Happy Shy Generous Loving Angry Selfish Joyful AggressiveSuspiciousAfraid Good sportBrave Tattle tale Good Problem Solver Affectionate Helpful Confident HonestInterrupting Unsure Fair Bad sport Braggard Really Mad Sneaky GreedySmart Complainer Loyal Good Athlete Flexible Funny Tearful Good Friend

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