Learnovation Open Forum
                                   27 May 2009, Brussels

                                       E...
Odile Quintin, Director General for Education, Training, Culture, Youth, European
Commission, welcomed the participants by...
Each session counted with an input from the Learnovation project and discussed some of the 24
Statements proposed by Learn...
Session 2 - Changing relationships between learning and working

The statements were appreciated by participants and some ...
Session 3 - New value chains for higher education

This session started with a general discussion on the new competition c...
Session 4 - Learning individuals and learning communities

During the open round table “Learning individuals and communiti...
Recognising learning achievements is a powerful way to motivate people to learn further: the
implementation of the Europea...
3. Priority setting and voting

Following the presentations of the main conclusions from the parallel sessions, the Learno...
4. Panel: Stakeholders involvement in a long-term perspective

Moderator: Anthony F. Camilleri, Scienter

−   The European...
The main conclusion of the panel in terms of stakeholders’ involvement can be summarised as
follows, according to the role...
6. List of participants

 Name                    Surname            Organisation/Institute           Country
 Stefania   ...
Kathrin                 Deventer          European Festivals Association     Belgium
 Jim                     Devine      ...
Veronique               Maes               elearning consultant            Belgium
 Cinzia                  Manetti       ...
Rolf                    Reinhardt        EFQUEL                             Belgium
 André                   Richier      ...
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Learnovation 10 Imperatives For Change

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Learnovation

10 Imperatives For Change

Joao Jose Saraiva da Fonseca

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Learnovation 10 Imperatives For Change

  1. 1. Learnovation Open Forum 27 May 2009, Brussels Event Report Executive Summary The Learnovation Open Forum entitled "Removing the barriers to creativity and innovation? Listening to stakeholders’ voice”, was held on 27 May 2009 in Brussels, gathering the main European networks in the field of innovation and ICT for Education and Training. This event was organised by the Learnovation Roundtable with the support of the European Commission as a contribution to the European Year of Creativity and Innovation, and resulted in the launch of the “10 imperatives for change” to make European education and lifelong learning a lever for innovation. The conference counted with the participation of prestigious speakers, such as Ms. Odile Quintin, Director General for Education, Training, Culture, Youth (European Commission), Mr. Roberto Carneiro, former Minister of Education of Portugal (Universidade Católica Portuguesa) and Mr. Karlheinz Brandenburg (Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology), ambassador of the European Year of Creativity and Innovation and one of the fathers of mp3 technology. During the event, a list of priorities for action was discussed by more than 90 participants and “10 imperatives for change” were produced, that will be proposed to relevant EU and national policy makers and will represent the starting point of a broad societal consultation on the desired future of European education and lifelong learning. 1. Opening interventions Claudio Dondi, coordinator of the Learnovation Roundtable, briefly explained the logic and objectives of the event, which wants to be an open moment of stakeholders’ involvement on the important issues of innovation, creativity and ICT for learning. The event is organised by the Learnovation stakeholder Roundtable (www.learnovation.eu) in the frame of the Learnovation project (www.lelearningeuropa.info/learnovation) with the support of the European Commission, and wants to give a contribution to the European Year of Creativity and Innovation. The point of departure of the Learnovation initiative is the gap between “desired innovation” and “achieved innovation” in European education and raining, but also in the European society in general. It is reasonable to expect that an open involvement of all categories of stakeholders of lifelong learning – not only the most consolidated groups – may create more favourable conditions to design, implement an evaluate innovation. The morning session is designed to comment what has to be done – the 24 statements extracted from a broad set of study and consultation activities conducted by the Learnovation project and Roundtable; while the afternoon session is designed to discuss how an open consultation of stakeholders may become a permanent bottom-up complement to the institutional consultation and concertation mechanisms for European policy makers in the field of lifelong learning. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 1
  2. 2. Odile Quintin, Director General for Education, Training, Culture, Youth, European Commission, welcomed the participants by stating that ICT is a key asset for creativity and innovation in European education and lifelong learning, and that investing in new and digital skills is paramount for the future of Europe. She confirmed the importance of the Learnovation Open Forum slogan “removing the barriers to creativity and innovation” and the importance of involving as much as possible all relevant stakeholders in the decision making process, both as far as the new Lifelong learning Programme and the general EC policy for education and lifelong learning are concerned, including important initiatives such as the EIT – European Institute for Innovation and technology. Roberto Carneiro, Universidade Catolica Portuguesa and former Minister of Education of Portugal, set the ground for the event by proposing a number of conceptual frameworks related to innovation, creativity and change in and around lifelong learning systems. He reflected on the needed conditions for real change to happen including management and leadership, and concluded that we somehow have an “over-managed” and a “sub-led” Europe. Investing in measures able to uncap creativity and therefore foster innovation can help Europe to be the protagonist of the knowledge-intensive and wisdom-led change that is now needed in the world. Karlheinz Brandenburg, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology (IDMT), Ambassador of the European Year of Creativity and Innovation, presented the story of the creation of the mp3 technology as a key innovation moment in European technology history. Prof Brandemburg, considered as one of the fathers of the mp3, provided the audience with the message that everybody needs to be creative, that we need to give priority to the future and that we do need both fresh ideas in Europe and the capacity to valorize those ideas. Finally, he reflected on the importance of the following lessons learned for any innovation-driven venture: − Importance of process and problem solving vs. content; − When European teams are able to work together they can create world benchmark; − Listening to stakeholders, including the market, is as important as taking the right decisions. Among the comments received by the audience, the following are worth mentioning: − Public funding for research in education seems to be a key leverage to improve the understanding of the conditions at the basis of innovation and creativity in Education and lifelong learning in Europe. − The creativity process is worth investigation: new ideas and new questions seem to come from finding new solutions to old problems. − Cross-disciplinarity and capacity for ideas-sharing were stressed as key points to increase the level of innovation of European economy and society. − Failure seems to be necessary in science, and therefore a degree of courage is needed to innovate European social systems, including education and lifelong learning. 2. Parallel sessions The audience split in the following four parallel discussion sessions: Session 1 - Learning in the life of digital natives Session 2 - Changing relationships between learning and working Session 3 - New value chains for higher education Session 4 - Learning individuals and learning communities Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 2
  3. 3. Each session counted with an input from the Learnovation project and discussed some of the 24 Statements proposed by Learnovation, in order to improve and refine them. All sessions counted with a multinational and multistakeholder group of participant who actively and lively worked for almost two hours in expressing views and concerns around the proposed issues and statements. To make an example, Session 1 counted with 23 participants from 9 countries representing the European Commission, national government, regional government, educators, industry, parents and researchers. Session 1 - Learning in the life of digital natives During the session, all the proposed statements were discussed and improved following the concerns of the different stakeholders represented. A key point in the discussion was the needed strategy to “integrate education and learning into real-life”: the distance between classic curriculum-based experiences and the amount of informal learning taking place outside formal E&T settings seems to be perceived as one of the main barriers to innovation and creativity. In this line of reasoning, it was stated that assessment and examination systems should “serve” learning objectives and hat teacher training systems, which are at the basis of potential innovation in European education, shall be made more open to innovation filtering from daily life of both digital natives and digital immigrants. The following statements resulted from the work of the session: 1.a Increase focus on learning processes and attitudes Disciplinary contents are important, but more focus should be put on explaining and demonstrating processes such as problem solving, self assessment, information search and filtering, team work, evaluation, etc. − to develop higher level competences and − to root learning in a context and add meaning ICT may help to make each of these processes more effective and efficient. 1.b Re-integrate education into real life Education curricula and teaching/learning practice should come closer to societal needs and the habits of digital natives. 1.c Encourage diversity in learning processes Diversity of learners (including their e-competences) should not be seen as a hindering factor but rather an asset for peer learning. 1.d Ensure that assessment supports learning Examination practice should be changed in order to allow: − Differentiation of learning paths − Review and recognition of skills and competences developed This would introduce substantial room for innovation in contents and methods. 1.e Enhance the innovation capacity of teacher training systems Teachers training should include creative and innovative approaches to teaching/learning able to develop the motivation to learn and the joy of learning in future lifelong learners. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 3
  4. 4. Session 2 - Changing relationships between learning and working The statements were appreciated by participants and some changes where proposed as detailed below. In the discussion the following interesting points where raised: - Strong need to shift from the concept of competence to the concept of performance in designing, implementing and assessing learning at work; - Strong need to link accreditation mechanisms to performance and loose up bureaucratic barriers - Though the importance of process is key, knowledge should not be underestimated. In other words, formal education is key in providing the necessary knowledge upon which creativity and innovation processes can be enhanced. - When talking about learning at work learning styles as well as working roles have to be taken into consideration: diversity matters, variety is important and motivation is key. - Enhancing individual motivation to learn as well as companies’ engagement in motivating workers to learn is a priority. The following statements resulted from the work of the session: 2.a Encourage all forms of learning in the workplace Working and learning overlap in the knowledge society. The organisations should develop a climate supportive to open ways of learning which takes into consideration the motivation of both the learner and the organisation. 2.b Embed learning into change Organisational needs cannot be solely addressed by knowledge-based solutions; problems and opportunities for organisations should be addressed by project work, peer learning, experience exchange and informal learning, all of which can be supported by ICT. eLearning should be conceived as a means to support performance and accelerate transformation. 2.c Celebrate and recognise learning achievements Recognising the value of prior learning achievements both formal and informal in the workplace will encourage further learning. Learning should not be considered as only qualifications or as hierarchical levels. European reference tools like the EQF could be helpful in this respect. 2.d Remember diversity and differentiation of learning needs and styles The knowledge, competences; attitudes and values required in contemporary work places are diverse and differentiated. This should not be forgotten when optimistic positions are expressed on the potential of Web 2.0 forms of learning to make Lifelong Learning a reality for all. 2.e Encourage informal learning beyond the limits of one organisation Inter-organisational (i.e.: supply chain networks) and extra-organisational networks of people are gaining importance in continuing learning. Validation of such learning should be developed. 2.f Do not forget the bottom line Celebrate and recognise the contribution of learning to the strategic goals of the organisation where performance, innovation and success measures are met and / or exceeded. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 4
  5. 5. Session 3 - New value chains for higher education This session started with a general discussion on the new competition conditions of HE institutions in a world in which knowledge is easily accessible and abundant, and most students know how to access it, while many do not know how to select, process and consolidate it on pre-existing concepts and criteria. To this regard it was felt that a statement regarding the open educational resources and the open access category was missing from the proposed list. It was then observed and agreed how little ICT is part of the mainstream discussion on HE (e.g. the Bologna Process) and a new statement was proposed (3.a) in consideration of the fact that ICT can make possible many of the innovation aims of the HE system, among which the “learning outcomes revolution”. A new statement was proposed (3.f) to address the importance of curricular innovation and appropriate/relevant indicators. The rest of the statements were discussed and amended to result in the following list. 3.a Integrate ICT into the broader European HE discourse Subtitle not yet available (new statement) 3.b Make sure quality assurance processes require innovation Quality assurance systems must become able to assess and reward innovation and structurally open to evolution of practice in teaching and learning involving different categories of learners. 3.c Exploit the potential of ICT as enabler of quality enhancement, of innovation and of equity The Bologna process should pay more attention to ICT potential to accompany and accelerate the desired innovation lines of higher education, including the pending issues of equity and access. 3.d Use the potential of virtual mobility to democratise access HE on a (inter-)national level Virtual mobility should no longer be seen as a poor substitute of classic students mobility, but as a complementary and powerful way to allow to study internationally to practically all higher education students and to consolidate relationship among H.E. institutions of different countries, also beyond the borders of the European Union. 3.e Support the integration of informal learning using social networking technologies while avoiding institutional invasion of student space New forms of learning - autonomously and through social networking - should be considered and valued by H.E. institutions, but attempts to control and absorb them into institutional learning environments may be counterproductive and discourage self-regulated learning and informal peer support. 3.f Stimulate the development of relevant, innovative curricula and develop appropriate indicators Subtitle not yet available (new statement) Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 5
  6. 6. Session 4 - Learning individuals and learning communities During the open round table “Learning individuals and communities” the participants recognised the urgency of bringing informal learning into the policy spectrum and act upon it. They also discussed a variety of concrete strategies for doing so, but the core discussion remained on the place of informal learning in European and national agendas. The first debated question had to do with the 'European approach' to informal learning and its integration in education and training policies. The participants agreed that before acting upon it, the purpose of informal learning has to be clear for all; and that a way to move forward lies in the recognition “that lifelong learning will never take up without informal learning”. Hence, they asked for a better integration of informal learning across all sub-programmes and key transversal activities of the lifelong learning programme. The participants also debated about the objectives of informal learning: what are the aims of informal learning and what role it plays in the development of individuals according to European policy concepts? Some see it directly related to inclusion and participation. Others put forward its impact on personal development and employability. What is the policy spectrum targeted: culture, education and youth; cross-cutting policies like growth and jobs; or employment and social rights? Answers vary along with the aims of informal learning. Policies and concrete actions have to be adapted to this diversity. Setting the informal learning agenda requires, for some participants, the deployment of an open method of consultation. At the level of concrete actions for the development of informal learning in Europe, participants reckon that: − Recognising learning achievements is a powerful way to motivate people to learn further: the implementation of the EQF is a great opportunity to address the issue and set up generalised approaches and facilities to do so. − The role of ICT cannot be underestimated in the development of informal learning for individuals and communities. − Informal learning and the recognition of its value pose some problems of reliability. − The learners’ quality literacy is becoming as important as formal quality assurance in order to respect the spontaneous and differently structured learning models in place. It is important to revisit the quality assurance process for informal learning. − Intermediation, between learners and educational providers, plays an important role for the recognition of informal learning. It is important to break the monopoly of formal assessment and certification and to open up to new informal networks of recognition. The following statements resulted from the work of the session: 4.a Bring informal learning into the policy spectrum Lifelong Learning for all citizens may become a reality earlier than foreseen thanks to new ways of ICT-supported and socially-networked informal learning: policies at all levels should acknowledge this potential and act consequently. 4.b Address quality issues in informal learning, but respect its specificity Informal learning and the recognition of its value poses some problems of reliability of sources and quality of processes, but learners quality literacy is probably a better approach than formal quality assurance to respect the spontaneous and differently structured learning models in place. 4.c Make recognition of informal learning outcomes a reality for all Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 6
  7. 7. Recognising learning achievements is a powerful way to motivate people to learn further: the implementation of the European Qualification Framework is a great opportunity to address the issue and set up generalised approaches and facilities to do so. The role of ICT-supported devices (ePortfolios, personal learning environments, social reputation systems, etc.) should not be underestimated to this purpose. 4.d Help teachers and trainers to recognise and respect the value of informal learning Teachers and trainers should be supported in using the potential of informal learning to complement and enrich the “institutional” teaching and learning process and in recommending learners ways to do so autonomously. 4.e Campaign for learning Lifelong Learning could become the flagship initiative for a creative and innovative Europe: awareness of citizens, organisations and communities should be raised through mass media campaigns and concrete incentives should be provided to engagement in learning. Transversal statements The following four transversal statements were also made available for discussion in the parallel sessions: T.1 Rescue research on education and Lifelong Learning from a marginal position The role of educational research should not be underestimated in producing the necessary change in learning systems and their governance models, although education and lifelong learning research needs a refreshed agenda and a better capacity to dialogue with all its stakeholders. T.2 Establish more connections among the different areas of Lifelong Learning From a learner’s perspective the institutional separation among school, VET, higher Education, adult learning makes little sense: a really integrated system of Lifelong Learning opportunities should be a common policy aim across Europe. T.3 Provide more evidence to policy making, but choose indicators that are able to push creativity and innovation, not only conformance Developing indicators and benchmarks for policy makers in an important achievement of the Lisbon strategy, but the risk should be avoided to focus only on those aspects that are easier to be measured, and more attention should be paid to innovation aspects. T.4 Face openly the issue of relevance of current learning provision: change is urgent There are many good reasons why change in institutional education may not be too quick, and stakeholders’ concern is one of them. However, the generalised perception of decreasing relevance of education should leave nobody indifferent: Europe needs learning systems which are closer to societal needs and encourage creativity and innovation, and it needs them now. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 7
  8. 8. 3. Priority setting and voting Following the presentations of the main conclusions from the parallel sessions, the Learnovation statements were rated in real time by the participants. This brought to the emergence of the following 10 most voted statements: 1. Rescue research on education and Lifelong Learning from a marginal position The role of educational research should not be underestimated in producing the necessary change in learning systems and their governance models, although education and lifelong learning research needs a refreshed agenda and a better capacity to dialogue with all its stakeholders. 2. Provide more evidence to policy making, but choose indicators that are able to push creativity and innovation, not only conformance Developing indicators and benchmarks for policy makers in an important achievement of the Lisbon strategy, but the risk should be avoided to focus only on those aspects that are easier to be measured, and more attention should be paid to innovation aspects. 3. Face openly the issue of relevance of current learning provision: change is urgent There are many good reasons why change in institutional education may not be too quick, and stakeholders’ concerns is one of them. However, the generalised perception of decreasing relevance of education should leave nobody indifferent: Europe needs learning systems which are closer to societal needs and encourage creativity and innovation, and it needs them now. 4. Establish more connections among the different areas of Lifelong Learning From a learner’s perspective the institutional separation among school, VET, higher Education, adult learning makes little sense: a really integrated system of Lifelong Learning should be a common policy aim across Europe. 5. Celebrate and recognise learning achievements Recognising the value of prior learning achievements in the workplace is fundamental to encourage further learning, EQF has a potential to support this at EU and world level. 6. Bring informal learning into the policy spectrum LLL for all citizens may become a reality earlier than foreseen thanks to new ways of ICT-supported and socially-networked informal learning: policies at all levels should acknowledge this potential and act consequently. 7. Enhance the innovation capacity of teacher training systems Teachers training should include creative and innovative approaches to teaching/learning able to develop the motivation to learn and the joy of learning in future lifelong learners. 8. Help teachers and trainers to recognise and respect the value of informal learning Teachers and trainers should be supported in using the potential of informal learning to complement and enrich the “institutional” teaching and learning process and in recommending learners ways to do so autonomously. 9. Encourage all forms of learning at workplace Working and learning tend to overlap in the knowledge society, but the development of a climate supportive to open ways of learning does not happen in all organisational contexts. 10. Remember that not all workers are stereotypical knowledge workers Non-knowledge workers should not be forgotten when optimist positions are expressed on the potential of new Web 2.0 forms of learning to make Lifelong Learning a reality for all. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 8
  9. 9. 4. Panel: Stakeholders involvement in a long-term perspective Moderator: Anthony F. Camilleri, Scienter − The European Commission perspective. Maruja Gutierrez-Diaz, European Commission − The researchers’ perspective. Alan Brown, TLRP - UK, European Education Research Association − The regional perspective. Matthias Holzner, MFG Baden-Württemberg − The teachers’ perspective. Eileen Brennan Freeman, Trinity College − The students’ perspective. Ligia Deca, European Students Union − The industry perspective. Elmar Husmann, IBM-eLIG The session was designed to give stakeholders a space where they could explain the rationale for involving stakeholders, and look towards means and methods as to how such involvement may take place. When challenged to justify their involvement in education and training systems, the various stakeholders made the point that they deserved a stake in decision making processes due to: − Their status as the representatives of particular interest groups; − The fact that decisions taken have direct effect on the same interest groups; − Their expertise in the areas in which the policies deal. While some participants seemed to agree that not all stakeholders necessarily hold equal stake in decision making processes, they did not venture to propose a classification or methods to deal with these differences in stake. In terms of mechanisms and strategies for involvement of stakeholders, the panellists, especially those from research-oriented professions/institutions, focussed mainly on funding schemes as a method for empowering the participation of stakeholders. Here, the most important points raised included: − The need for more programs to specifically finance exploitation of results developed in previous projects − The possibility of providing more framework agreements to allow long-running initiatives to plan and operate on a more long-term, sustainable basis − The necessity of putting even more emphasis on the valorisation of results from current projects, and moving to a model where the onus for such valorisation is shared by the funding institution, and not left exclusively to the grant-holder. In terms of innovation, the panel members proved somewhat sceptical of the concept of measuring creativity and innovation, as well as of centralised strategies designed to kick-start innovation. Instead, they argued that (a) a wealth of creativity and innovation already exists in Europe which is not put to good use, and that (b) any strategy for the promotion of innovation must focus on user-driven innovation (linked to concepts such as self-directed learning, entrepreneurship education etc), which, if properly dealt with, could become a new paradigm for education. The panellists also chose to stress the importance of research in social sciences and humanities, in pushing forward any educational agenda, and developing learning ecosystems. This is based on the argument that the process of education is one of aiding the conversion of theories (from research) into practice, and, as such, the absence of such research, even into this process itself, would effectively put the foundations out of the educational system. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 9
  10. 10. The main conclusion of the panel in terms of stakeholders’ involvement can be summarised as follows, according to the role of the stakeholders, which can be one, the other, or both: − Role of political representatives/unionists: in these cases stakeholders speak on behalf of the interests of their members, and as such need to have fora available, in which their views can be listened to and considered. It is important that such fora are established within formal consultative cycles, and not on an ad hoc basis − Role of experts in the field: in this case, stakeholders in the panel see the main challenge as one of providing for better dissemination of results and conclusions from research (usually done within the framework of projects), and of providing more stable and certain conditions under which such type of research can take place. 5. Closing remarks Claudio Dondi, Learnovation Roundtable: Conclusions of the day Claudio Dondi expressed his satisfaction – also on the behalf of the Learnovation Consortium and of the Learnovation Stakeholders Roundtable – for the outcomes of the event. He pinpointed the need – as emerging from the results of the Open Forum – to increasingly involve stakeholders in the design of policies and initiatives supporting learning innovation in Europe. Finally, he informed participants on the follow-up actions of Learnovation. In particular, he underlined that an open consultation would be soon launched on the 26 Learnovation statements resulted from the parallel sessions and that participants to the event would be invited to participate in the Learnovation DELPHI Survey, aimed to collect the experts’ views on the main factors affecting change of learning systems; on the future evolution of learning systems and their suggestions for the priority of actions to be taken in order to reach the desired (rather than the undesirable) scenarios of evolution in the future. Finally, he concluded that Learnovation would commit to make open consultation a permanent exercise rather than an exceptional event. In this sense, the Learnovation Open Forum has to be considered as the first step of a systematic consultation process involving stakeholders in the debate on the role of learning for innovation and creativity and for shaping the future of Europe. Karlheinz Brandenburg, Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology (IDMT), Ambassador of the European Year of Creativity and Innovation Karlheinz Brandenburg highlighted the importance and relevance of the issues discussed and emerged during the day. He underlined the need, in learning environments as well as in the working world, to increase the focus on processes as only the combination of knowledge and processes can foster creativity and innovation. Finally, he thanked the Learnovation Stakeholders Roundtable and the Learnovation Consortium for the organisation of the event. Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 10
  11. 11. 6. List of participants Name Surname Organisation/Institute Country Stefania Aceto SCIENTER Italy Saïda Allachi MENON Network Belgium Lurdes Angles Vila Gov. Catalonia - Deleg.BXL Spain Muhammad Ayyaz Ayyaz Climax Computers Pakistan Malik Pascal Balancier AWT Belgium Cristina Balari Fundación CEDDET Spain Laurence Baldewyns Technifutur Belgium Ignacio Baleztena Innovation Agency of Navarra Spain Licia Barattelli Anci Ideali Foundation Italy Emmanuel Bellengier U&I Learning France Pascale Biver EACEA Luxembourg Ingeborg Boe EFQUEL Norway Annemie Boonen EuroPACE ivzw Belgium Karlheinz Brandemburg Fraunhofer IDMT Germany Eileen Brennan Freeman Centre for Research in IT in Ireland Education (CRITE), Trinity College Dublin Alan Brown University of Warwick United Kingdom Miriana Bucalossi University of Siena Italy Anthony Fisher Camilleri SCIENTER Italy Roberto Carneiro Universidad Catolica Portuguesa Portugal Rocio Cervera Regional Office of Extremadura Spain in Brussels Aurelia Cezar County School Inspectorate Romania Elvira Conte En.A.I.P. Italy Ricardo Cospedal CEDDET Spain Giulia Costantino IHF – Institute de Haute Belgium Formation aux Politiques Communautaires Paul Coyne Emerald Group Publishing United Kingdom Chiara De Caro YES-European Confederation of Belgium Young Entrepreneurs Roberto De Miguel Garcia CICTOURGUNE Spain Ligia Deca European Students' Union (ESU) Belgium Karl Desloovere Department for Educational Belgium Development, Flemish Community of Belgium Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 11
  12. 12. Kathrin Deventer European Festivals Association Belgium Jim Devine IADT Ireland Gabriel Dima University Politehnica of Romania Bucharest Claudio Dondi SCIENTER Italy Daniela Drobna Faculty of political science and Slovakia international relations, University of Matej Bel, Banska Bystrica Marc Durando European Schoolnet Belgium Erik Duval K.U.Leuven Belgium Coello Elena EACEA Belgium Margaret Farren Dublin City University Ireleand Elisa Filippi Anci Ideali Foundation of Cities Italy Catherine Franche Ecsite - European Network for Belgium Science Centres and Museums Angel Luis Garcia Plaza Master-D S.A. Spain Bas Giesbers Maastricht University The Netherlands Estefania Gil Master Distancia S.A. Spain Estefania Gil Moñux Master-D S.A. Spain Hans Grönlund International Programme Office Sweden for Education and Training Maruja Gutierrez European Commission - DG EAC Belgium Heeok Heo Sunchon National University South Korea Jim Herbolich EFMD - European Foundation for Belgium Management Development Matthias Holzner MFG Baden-Württemberg mbH Germany Elmar Husmann ELIG Germany Ntegeka Issa Uganda Computer Services Uganda Oystein Johannessen Norwegian Ministry of Education Norway and Research Nikitas Kastis Lambrakis Foundation Greece Kathy Kikis-Papadakis FORTH/IACM Greece Elisabetta Kustermann SIOI Italy Anne Marie La Claire European Commission Belgium Ana Landeta Madrid Open University Spain Katja Legisa Teseo Sprl Belgium André Lemaylleux Université Libre Internat. Belgium Nigel Lloyd Cambridge Professional United Kingdom Development (CamProf) Kay MacKeogh Dublin City University Ireland Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 12
  13. 13. Veronique Maes elearning consultant Belgium Cinzia Manetti University of Siena Italy Ween Marianne Funksjonshemmedes Norway Studieforbund Clementina Marinoni Fondazione Politecnico di Italy Milano Anna Martelli ETS – European Training and Italy Studies Peter Mayr European Commission - DG Belgium Research Sabina Melavc Permanent Representation of Slovenian Slovenia to the EU Tomas Milar IFOAM EU Group Belgium Riel Miller xperidox futures consulting France M. C. Patricia Morales University of Leuven Belgium Stefan Morcov SIVECO Romania SA Romania David Morley EADL UK Elisabetta Mughini ANSAS - exIndire Italy Mihaly Nagy European Commission - DG EAC Hungary Andrea Naranjo Leclercq COTA BELGIUM Fabio Nascimbeni MENON Network Belgium Carlo Nati SSIS Universita' del Lazio Italy Béatrice Niyibigira MENON Network Belgium Richard Noss Institute of Education/London United Kingdom Knowledge Lab Paula Osés European Projects Office- Spain Extremadura's Regional Government Kathryn Owens Committee of the Regions Belgium Ilyana Panteleeva European Federation for Belgium Intercultural Learning (EFIL) Eleonora Pantò CSP Italy Thea Payome CHECK.point eLearning Germany Eduardo Paz Centro de Formacion Online - Spain Comercio Electronico Global Margarita Perez MENON Network Belgium Leonardo Piccinetti EFB United Kingdom Yves Punie European Commission - IPTS Spain Sranislav Ranguelov Eduactio, Audiovisual and Belgium Culture Executive Agency Martin Rehm Maastricht University The Netherlands Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 13
  14. 14. Rolf Reinhardt EFQUEL Belgium André Richier European Commission Belgium Mirjam Rinderer Permanent Representation of Austria Austria to the EU Antoni Riu P.A.U. EDUCATION Spain Renzo Rubele EuroScience Belgium Susanna Sancassani Politecnico di Milano-Centro Italy METID Juana M. Sancho Universitat de Barcelona Spain Anna Maria Sansoni European Commission Belgium Friedrich Scheuermann European Commission, JRC, Italy CRELL Martin Schneider Mihok Consult sprl Belgium Lucienne Sharpe Touch the Sky Ltd England Peter Sloep Open Universiteit Nederland The Netherlands Morten Søby Network for IT-Research and Norway Competence in Education, University of Oslo (ITU) Mario Spatafora EBTN Italy Vito Spinelli EVTA Italy Simon Squire Bristol City Learning Centres UK Karl Steffens University of Cologne Germany Andras Szucs EDEN - European Distance and Hungary E-Learning Network José Valiente Berná Universidad de Valencia Spain Lieve Van den Brande European Commission - DG EAC Belgium Kees-Jan Van Dorp EADTU The Netherlands Claire Van Zande European Festivals Association France Bart Verswijvel Immaculata Instituut Belgium Vitus Vestergaard DREAM (Danish Research Centre Denmark on Education and Advanced Media Materials) Ernesto Villalba European Commission Italy Brygida Walczak Start-up Belgium Kugemann Walter ILI-FIM Germany Jocelyne Wang EFMD - European Foundation for Belgium Management Development Joseph Woods The World Centre for New Malta Thinking Monica Zuccarini University of Naples Federico II Italy Learnovation Open Forum – 27/05/2009 14

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