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Facc millennials, social media, and education connecting with your students

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  • Lisa
  • LisaThe Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • Lisa
  • JoshThe Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • JoshRelatively ShelteredGrew up among “kid safety rules”: school lockdowns, national youth safety movementsMore conventional than Gen-XersHigh level confidence / self importanceTeam OrientedClose with ParentsTechnology Savvy
  • Lisa
  • JoshMillennialslearn better through discovery and experiential learning rather than by being toldhave the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choose not to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attentional deploymentbelieve multitasking is a way of life and are comfortable when engaged in multiple activities simultaneouslybelieve staying connected is essential and they want a fast response time(Howe & Strauss, 2000)
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  • Joshhttp://www.flowtown.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Millennials-7-16.png
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  • LisaHave never known a life withoutcomputers and the InternetConsider computers a part of lifeConnect to information Communicate in real-timeHave social networkingHave been raised in the presence of video and computer gamesStudents in their 20s may have had more experience with games than with reading (Oblinger,2004).These experiences helped to form the way in which millennials seek, process, and report information.
  • Lisa
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  • JoshWorried that too many tweets are mere pointless babble? So is Australia’s Griffith University, who recently made Twitter education part of the mandatory courseload for journalism students.According to a senior lecturer at the University, “Some students’ tweets are not as in depth as you might like.” The solution? Make Twitter writing practice a compulsory part of the course curriculum for would-be journalists.University officials cited increasing demand from employers for new hires well-versed in social media, and Twitter’s() importance in global events like the Iran elections earlier this year.While we perhaps would have given up a prized appendage to have anything as cool as a Twitter course available back when we were in school during the Pleistocene Era, the Griffith U students’ reactions have been mixed. Some students had no idea what Twitter even was (sort of proving the point of needed education for future journalists!), and a few outspoken J-schoolers who felt the class was “a waste of time.” Clearly kids these days don’t know how good they have it.What’s your take: should Twitter fluency be required for future journalists? Or is it impractical to expect students to inject “more depth” into their tweets?
  • Lisa
  • Lisa
  • LisaHotseat, a social networking-powered mobile Web application, creates a collaborative classroom, allowing students to provide near real-time feedback during class and enabling professors to adjust the course content and improve the learning experience. Students can post messages to Hotseat using their Facebook or Twitter accounts, sending text messages, or logging in to the Hotseat Web site. http://www.itap.purdue.edu/tlt/hotseat/ http://mashable.com/2009/11/03/hotseat/
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  • JoshPortfolio:The portfolio is an assessment tool that allows your instructor to assess your progress in English. It is a reflection of your learning in EAP 1560 and careful consideration and care should be given to your work. The portfolio is a compilation of work done over the semester. It must show your progress through the course. The portfolio must be written entirely in English and each assignment will reflect the grammar that we are currently learning in class. For the portfolio, you will be using facebook.com. You must establish an academic Facebook account. For this account, you will use your Atlas email address to register and this account is reserved only for completion of class assignments. You will be joining the group that was created for this class and the group is closed so you may not add other friends outside of our class. For each chapter, you must submit one posting on YOUR wall – not on the group wall. The topics for each chapter will be provided. The posting must be of six to ten sentences and must strongly incorporate the grammar of the chapter. Effective use of grammar structures, as well as spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure, will count toward your grade. Each chapter posting must be completed by 11:59 p.m. on the due date. A typed copy of the chapter posting is to be submitted to the instructor at the class session following the due date. For example, the first Facebook posting is due on Wednesday, May 12 at 11:59 p.m.; therefore, the typed copy of your posting is due at the next class period on Thursday, May 13. Please include the name of the chapter for each posting. (50% of portfolio grade) Search for: Valencia Community College, EAP 1560, Summer A Term 2010Click on Request to JoinYou will now be a member of our class group 2. You will visit at least ten classmates’ Facebook pages during the semester. You will write twenty (20) comments of four to eight sentences each and ask ten (10) questions in English for other students’ postings. Questions should elicit information from the other students beyond what the other student has already written, and the comments should show reflection and consideration of the other students’ comments. (“That’s great” or “I agree” are examples of comments that are not acceptable. If you agree with what another student has written, then give reasons why and give specific details.) At the end of the semester, you will submit your twenty comments and ten questions in an organized and typed list that you made over the semester. Include the name of the student whose page you visited and the date you visited that site. Your list must include twenty comments and ten questions. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure count. Your comments and questions should demonstrate an ability to correspond in English. (50% of portfolio grade)
  • Lisa
  • JoshPortfolio:The portfolio is an assessment tool that allows your instructor to assess your progress in English. It is a reflection of your learning in EAP 1560 and careful consideration and care should be given to your work. The portfolio is a compilation of work done over the semester. It must show your progress through the course. The portfolio must be written entirely in English and each assignment will reflect the grammar that we are currently learning in class. For the portfolio, you will be using facebook.com. You must establish an academic Facebook account. For this account, you will use your Atlas email address to register and this account is reserved only for completion of class assignments. You will be joining the group that was created for this class and the group is closed so you may not add other friends outside of our class. For each chapter, you must submit one posting on YOUR wall – not on the group wall. The topics for each chapter will be provided. The posting must be of six to ten sentences and must strongly incorporate the grammar of the chapter. Effective use of grammar structures, as well as spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure, will count toward your grade. Each chapter posting must be completed by 11:59 p.m. on the due date. A typed copy of the chapter posting is to be submitted to the instructor at the class session following the due date. For example, the first Facebook posting is due on Wednesday, May 12 at 11:59 p.m.; therefore, the typed copy of your posting is due at the next class period on Thursday, May 13. Please include the name of the chapter for each posting. (50% of portfolio grade) Search for: Valencia Community College, EAP 1560, Summer A Term 2010Click on Request to JoinYou will now be a member of our class group 2. You will visit at least ten classmates’ Facebook pages during the semester. You will write twenty (20) comments of four to eight sentences each and ask ten (10) questions in English for other students’ postings. Questions should elicit information from the other students beyond what the other student has already written, and the comments should show reflection and consideration of the other students’ comments. (“That’s great” or “I agree” are examples of comments that are not acceptable. If you agree with what another student has written, then give reasons why and give specific details.) At the end of the semester, you will submit your twenty comments and ten questions in an organized and typed list that you made over the semester. Include the name of the student whose page you visited and the date you visited that site. Your list must include twenty comments and ten questions. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure count. Your comments and questions should demonstrate an ability to correspond in English. (50% of portfolio grade)
  • Lisa

Facc millennials, social media, and education connecting with your students Presentation Transcript