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Facc millennials, social media, and education connecting with your students

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  • Lisa
  • Lisa

    The Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).
    The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).
    Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.
    Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.
    This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • Lisa
  • Josh
    The Millennial Generation has emerged as a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000).
    The definition of when millennials were born varies, with estimates ranging from 1977 (Tapscott, 1998) to 1982 (Howe & Strauss, 2000).
    Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.
    Unique millennial competency is the ability to effectively use broadly networked digital communication technologies to quickly and seamlessly accomplish a variety of tasks.
    This competency has resulted from their experiences with Internet communities (Gorman, Nelson, & Glassman, 2004).
  • Josh
    Relatively Sheltered
    Grew up among “kid safety rules”: school lockdowns, national youth safety movements
    More conventional than Gen-Xers
    High level confidence / self importance
    Team Oriented
    Close with Parents
    Technology Savvy
  • Lisa
  • Josh
    Millennials
    learn better through discovery and experiential learning rather than by being told
    have the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choose not to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attentional deployment
    believe multitasking is a way of life and are comfortable when engaged in multiple activities simultaneously
    believe staying connected is essential and they want a fast response time (Howe & Strauss, 2000)
  • Josh
  • Josh
    http://www.flowtown.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/Millennials-7-16.png
  • Josh
  • Josh
  • Lisa
    Have never known a life without
    computers and the Internet
    Consider computers a part of life
    Connect to information
    Communicate in real-time
    Have social networking
    Have been raised in the presence of video and computer games
    Students in their 20s may have had more experience with games than with reading (Oblinger,2004).

    These experiences helped to form the way in which millennials seek, process, and report information.
  • Lisa
  • Josh
  • Josh
  • Josh
  • Josh
  • Lisa
  • Lisa
  • Josh
  • Lisa
  • Josh
    Worried that too many tweets are mere pointless babble? So is Australia’s Griffith University, who recently made Twitter education part of the mandatory courseload for journalism students.
    According to a senior lecturer at the University, “Some students’ tweets are not as in depth as you might like.” The solution? Make Twitter writing practice a compulsory part of the course curriculum for would-be journalists.
    University officials cited increasing demand from employers for new hires well-versed in social media, and Twitter’s() importance in global events like the Iran elections earlier this year.
    While we perhaps would have given up a prized appendage to have anything as cool as a Twitter course available back when we were in school during the Pleistocene Era, the Griffith U students’ reactions have been mixed. Some students had no idea what Twitter even was (sort of proving the point of needed education for future journalists!), and a few outspoken J-schoolers who felt the class was “a waste of time.” Clearly kids these days don’t know how good they have it.
    What’s your take: should Twitter fluency be required for future journalists? Or is it impractical to expect students to inject “more depth” into their tweets?
  • Lisa
  • Lisa
  • Lisa
    Hotseat, a social networking-powered mobile Web application, creates a collaborative classroom, allowing students to provide near real-time feedback during class and enabling professors to adjust the course content and improve the learning experience. Students can post messages to Hotseat using their Facebook or Twitter accounts, sending text messages, or logging in to the Hotseat Web site. http://www.itap.purdue.edu/tlt/hotseat/

    http://mashable.com/2009/11/03/hotseat/
  • Josh
  • Josh
  • Lisa
  • Josh
    Portfolio:
    The portfolio is an assessment tool that allows your instructor to assess your progress in English. It is a reflection of your learning in EAP 1560 and careful consideration and care should be given to your work. The portfolio is a compilation of work done over the semester. It must show your progress through the course. The portfolio must be written entirely in English and each assignment will reflect the grammar that we are currently learning in class.
     
    For the portfolio, you will be using facebook.com. You must establish an academic Facebook account. For this account, you will use your Atlas email address to register and this account is reserved only for completion of class assignments. You will be joining the group that was created for this class and the group is closed so you may not add other friends outside of our class.
     
    For each chapter, you must submit one posting on YOUR wall – not on the group wall. The topics for each chapter will be provided. The posting must be of six to ten sentences and must strongly incorporate the grammar of the chapter. Effective use of grammar structures, as well as spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure, will count toward your grade.
     
    Each chapter posting must be completed by 11:59 p.m. on the due date. A typed copy of the chapter posting is to be submitted to the instructor at the class session following the due date. For example, the first Facebook posting is due on Wednesday, May 12 at 11:59 p.m.; therefore, the typed copy of your posting is due at the next class period on Thursday, May 13. Please include the name of the chapter for each posting. (50% of portfolio grade)
     
    Search for: Valencia Community College, EAP 1560, Summer A Term 2010
    Click on Request to Join
    You will now be a member of our class group
     
    2. You will visit at least ten classmates’ Facebook pages during the semester. You will write twenty (20) comments of four to eight sentences each and ask ten (10) questions in English for other students’ postings. Questions should elicit information from the other students beyond what the other student has already written, and the comments should show reflection and consideration of the other students’ comments. (“That’s great” or “I agree” are examples of comments that are not acceptable. If you agree with what another student has written, then give reasons why and give specific details.)
     
    At the end of the semester, you will submit your twenty comments and ten questions in an organized and typed list that you made over the semester. Include the name of the student whose page you visited and the date you visited that site. Your list must include twenty comments and ten questions. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure count. Your comments and questions should demonstrate an ability to correspond in English. (50% of portfolio grade)
  • Lisa
  • Josh
    Portfolio:
    The portfolio is an assessment tool that allows your instructor to assess your progress in English. It is a reflection of your learning in EAP 1560 and careful consideration and care should be given to your work. The portfolio is a compilation of work done over the semester. It must show your progress through the course. The portfolio must be written entirely in English and each assignment will reflect the grammar that we are currently learning in class.
     
    For the portfolio, you will be using facebook.com. You must establish an academic Facebook account. For this account, you will use your Atlas email address to register and this account is reserved only for completion of class assignments. You will be joining the group that was created for this class and the group is closed so you may not add other friends outside of our class.
     
    For each chapter, you must submit one posting on YOUR wall – not on the group wall. The topics for each chapter will be provided. The posting must be of six to ten sentences and must strongly incorporate the grammar of the chapter. Effective use of grammar structures, as well as spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure, will count toward your grade.
     
    Each chapter posting must be completed by 11:59 p.m. on the due date. A typed copy of the chapter posting is to be submitted to the instructor at the class session following the due date. For example, the first Facebook posting is due on Wednesday, May 12 at 11:59 p.m.; therefore, the typed copy of your posting is due at the next class period on Thursday, May 13. Please include the name of the chapter for each posting. (50% of portfolio grade)
     
    Search for: Valencia Community College, EAP 1560, Summer A Term 2010
    Click on Request to Join
    You will now be a member of our class group
     
    2. You will visit at least ten classmates’ Facebook pages during the semester. You will write twenty (20) comments of four to eight sentences each and ask ten (10) questions in English for other students’ postings. Questions should elicit information from the other students beyond what the other student has already written, and the comments should show reflection and consideration of the other students’ comments. (“That’s great” or “I agree” are examples of comments that are not acceptable. If you agree with what another student has written, then give reasons why and give specific details.)
     
    At the end of the semester, you will submit your twenty comments and ten questions in an organized and typed list that you made over the semester. Include the name of the student whose page you visited and the date you visited that site. Your list must include twenty comments and ten questions. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure count. Your comments and questions should demonstrate an ability to correspond in English. (50% of portfolio grade)
  • Lisa

Transcript

  • 1. WHAT IS THIS PRESENTATION ALL ABOUT? 2 TheMillennial Generation: Who arethey? What are they like? What are they doing? How doweengage them?
  • 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_CgM2btWz M 3
  • 3. The Millennial Generation 4 TheMillennial Generation has emergedas a force that will shape the social and economic dynamics of the next decade (Howe & Strauss, 2000). Researchers agree that the uniqueness of millennials results from technological forces that have affected this generation.
  • 4. Millennial Students Characteristics 5
  • 5. 6 “Individuals raised with computers deal with information differently compared to previous cohorts: They develop hypertext minds, they leap around.” - Marc Prensky
  • 6. Characteristics of the Millennials O Learn better through discovery and experiential learning rather than by being told O Have the ability to shift their attention rapidly from one task to another and may choosenot to pay attention to things that don’t interest them — attention deployment O Believe multitasking is a way of life and arecomfortable when engagedin multiple activities simultaneously O Believe staying connected is essential and they want a fast response time (Howe& Strauss,2000) 7
  • 7. 8 Their learning styles originated with millennials growing up with technology –millennials were born around the time the PC was introduced –20 percentof the students began using computers between the ages of 5 and 8 –and almost all millennials wereusing computers by the time they were16 to 18 years of age (Jones, 2002).
  • 8. MILLENIALS TECHNOLOGY 9 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% No landline (cell phone only) Texted while driving Texted in thepast 24 hours Useacell phoneto text Use twitter Posted video of themselvesonline Used wireless internetawayfrom home Createdsocial networkingprofile 41% 64% 80% 88% 14% 20% 62% 75% AND http://bit.ly/aUJvzp
  • 9. MILLENIALS Technology 10 AND 7% 51% 71% 75% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% Feb-05 Aug-06 Nov-08 Jan-10 Social networking sites: how use has changed http://bit.ly/aUJvzp
  • 10. MILLENIALS NEWS 11 AND http://bit.ly/aUJvzp
  • 11. Millennial Students 12 OHave never known a life withoutcomputers and the Internet OConsider computers a part of life OConnectto information OCommunicateinreal-time OHave social networking OHave been raised in thepresence of video and computergames OStudentsin their 20s may have had more experience withgames than with reading (Oblinger,2004).
  • 12. How they “ Tick ” O Exposed to vast amounts of information at a very young age O Different patterns of communications and social intimacy O Ambitious, but with unrealistic expectations O Well aware of rules, but enjoy the challenge of circumventing the rules 13
  • 13. ENGAGING THE MILLENNIALS OLearn ata fastpace thatdoesnot involvea “telling style”/“text-oriented”styleofteaching OLikevisual examples,lesstext,and lesstelling OWantinteractivity 14
  • 14. 15
  • 15. 16 “Your goal should not be to discard social media, but to figure out how to make it a powerful tool, rather than a useless distraction.” -Ben Parr
  • 16. A Vision of K-12 Students Today 17 Social Media Revolution 2010
  • 17. 18 “The qualities that make Twitter seem insane and half-baked are what makes it so powerful.” - Jonathan Zittrain –Harvard Law Professor & Internet Expert
  • 18. 19 Glossary of Twitter Terms Tweet. A message sent via Twitter (140 Charters). Hashtag. Hashtags allow the community to easily stream a particular subject by using a hash in front of the tag. Example: Putting #iPhone in a tweet about the iPhone. DM. A Direct Message sent via Twitter only the recipient can see. Twittastic. The Twitter version of fantastic. Dweet. A tweet sent while drunk. http://webtrends.about.com/od/twitter/a/twitter_glossary.htm
  • 19. 20 “Why do I want to write only 140 characters at a time?” -Josh Murdock Variety of Content – News Source – Instant Information – Promotional Tool – Networking https://twitter.com/professorjosh
  • 20. 21 “It use to be, you had to be famous to let everyone know what was on your mind. Not any more!” -Lisa Macon https://twitter.com/lisamacon
  • 21. 22 “University Makes Twitter a Required Class for Journalism Students.” University officials cited increasing demand from employers for new hires well-versed in social media, and Twitter’s importance in global events like the Iran elections earlier this year. http://mashable.com/2009/10/23/twitter-class/
  • 22. 23 “Before long you begin to realize how much Twitter helps you inspire others.” - A m a n d a K e r n https://twitter.com/amandakern
  • 23. 24 “ The principle goal of education is to create men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.” - Jean Piaget
  • 24. 25 Hotseat at Purdue University http://www.itap.purdue.edu/tlt/hotseat/
  • 25. 26 Facebook Stats - www.facebook.com More than 500 million active users 50% of our active users log on daily Average 130 friends People spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook Average user is connected to 80 community pages, groups, and events Average user creates 90 pieces of content each month
  • 26. 2727 “FACEBOOK IS MY SOCIAL AND WORK NETWORK.” – Josh Murdock Connect – Collaborate – Share – Network http://www.facebook.com/joshmurdock My “Like” Pages
  • 27. 2828 “Not being on Facebook is like not having a TV or not owning a cell phone. You can avoid it, but you’ll really miss out. ” – Lisa Macon http://www.facebook.com/lisamacon My “Like” Page
  • 28. 2929 Facebook for EAP courses – Wendy Wish-BogueEnglish for Academic Purposes
  • 29. 3030 “Instead of asking students to stop using it, embrace Facebook as a learning & communication tool.” – A m a n d a K e r n http://www.facebook.com/amandakern
  • 30. 3131 Organizations & Departments Learning Technology and Alternative Delivery
  • 31. 32
  • 32. Twitter: @professorjosh Facebook: facebook.com/joshmurdock Wordpress: http://professorjosh.wordpress.com/ Email:jmurdock3@valenciacc.edu Twitter:@lisamacon Facebook: facebook.com/lisamacon Email:lmacon@valecniacc.edu