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FFI Presentation: School Focused
 

FFI Presentation: School Focused

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  • Introduction: Thank you for allowing us to speak to you today about the Northeast Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative. Provide, name, school, grade level, interests/hobbies, any interesting facts about yourself, etc.
  • We are part of the Food and Fitness Initiative (FFI) Regional Youth Leadership team. FFI promotes healthy local foods and creates environments for active lifestyles by working to change policies and systems.
  • The Northeast Iowa Food and Fitness Initiative is one of nine national sites funded by the WK Kellogg Foundation Food and Community Program. The other eight sites are represented on the U.S. map, include mostly large urban areas. Efforts in NE Iowa span six counties, equivalent in geographic area to the state of Connecticut and serves nearly 107,000 people. FFI has partnerships the Northeast Iowa Food and Farm Coalition, Luther College, ISU Extension, and public heath offices. In each county FFI individuals work together and several representatives from each county meet monthly. FFI very much sees youth as leaders, promoting food and fitness in our schools and town and we join forces with over 30 youth who meet throughout the year to help plan events, etc. Total there about 220 youth in the region involved with FFI.
  • Did you know that the current generation of children in the United States is expected to have shorter life spans than those of their parents due to disease related to sedentary lifestyles and inadequate nutrition? Society faces a twin epidemic of physical inactivity and poor nutrition.   The following slides are maps of the United States. They illustrate increases in adult obesity (BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person), from 1985 to 2009. If the maps included those who were overweight it would be even more startling. I was born in ___, this increase has taken place over the course of my lifetime! As I flip through the slides, notice how the states gradually becomes darker and more colorful. The more color and the darker shades, the higher the obesity rates. Notice that 9 states have adult obesity rates over 30% in 2008.
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  • This table shows the percentage of population overweight and obese in Iowa and in the six county region. As you can see most of the counties are exceed the state averages.
  • A student who eat both school breakfast and lunch everyday would have consumed 4,320 meals in 12 years. By the time we high school seniors, students we will have spent an average of 15,000 hours in the classroom. We, like students across the country, have spent a lot of our childhood and adolescence at school. As students we would like to see safe and healthy school environments [As members of school communities and citizens of towns, we have a responsible to these students to provide a safe and healthy environment] Research shows that transforming school food and increasing physical activity improves student our health and academic performance, and lowers absenteeism. (Include personal examples, if you have any) In addition, purchasing local foods helps generates money for schools and communities Our school is involved with FFI for the following reasons…. In turn FFI has supported our school the following way(s) (examples of what your school has done w/ FFI mini-grants, youth team activities, school wellness team activities etc.) Here are some suggestions: FFI supports our school and helps ensure that we’re surrounded with healthy/local food and opportunities for physical activity and play. FFI supports our youth teams, along with 15 others through the region, as well as 20 school districts to develop an active school wellness teams. Together youth teams and school wellness teams are responsible for creating opportunities for physical activity, improving school food and updating school wellness policies.  
  • NE Iowa FFI adopted Safe Routes to School and Farm to School. In 2009 there were 6 different pilot schools for each, (if you’re from a 2009-2010 pilot, feel free to add what your school did). This school year FFI is expanding its school outreach and helping those schools who weren’t pilots start Safe Routes to School and Farm to School.   Summarize in your own words: What is Safe Routes to School? [SRTS programs are sustained efforts by parents, schools, community leaders and local, state, and federal governments to improve the health and wellbeing of students by enabling and encouraging them to walk and bike to school. SRTS programs also involve increasing active living activities within the school day through intentional integration of physical activity into curriculum.( http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/resources/marketing_talking-points.cfm )]   Summarize in your own words: What is Farm to School? [Farm to School brings healthy food from local farms to school children nationwide, creating relationships between students and local food producers. Farm to School is a comprehensive program that extends beyond farm fresh salad bars and local foods in the cafeteria to include waste management programs like composting, and experiential education opportunities such as planting school gardens, cooking demonstrations and farm tours. The program teaches students about the path from farm to fork, and instills healthy eating habits that can last a lifetime. At the same time, use of local produce in school meals and educational activities provides a new direct market for farmers in the area and mitigates environmental impacts of transporting food long distances. The Farm to School approach helps children understand where their food comes from and how their food choices impact their bodies, the environment and their communities at large. (Source: http://www.farmtoschool.org/aboutus.php )]
  • There are 20 school districts involving 27 schools throughout the region. Here are just some of the examples of what schools throughout the 6 counties have been doing… (including us!)
  • Central High School (Elkader) has an active school wellness team. The team called “Central Food and Fitness” is a group of students, teachers, and administrators who meet regularly and generate new ideas and programs to increase the physical activity and improve the health of Central School and its community members. Central’s school wellness team presented at the 2010 Fall Food and Fitness Conference, which included some 245 community leaders, policy makers, school groups, etc.   In fall of 2009, FFI hosted, Mark Fenton an entertaining, persuasive, and knowledgeable walking advocate and professional race-walker. He toured northeast Iowa and gave advice about how to improve the built environments surrounding schools to make walking to school more accessible. Central Schools hosted a workshop with Mr. Fenton, students and school leaders throughout the region.
  • 14 area schools participated in HomeGrown School Lunch Week. Different schools featured a wide-variety of local foods. Food service employees marketed the local options, as being fresh from the farm. Many schools highlighted farm fresh produce on salad bars.
  • Turkey Valley Community Schools celebrated their 50 th anniversary during Homegrown School Lunch Week this fall. Students in K-12 th grades enjoyed local foods all week, Friday food service employees prepared potatoes that students had planted in their school garden. The potatoes were red, white and purple (black) varieties representing TV’s school colors.
  • 28 local food service employees participated in SafeFood this past February. SafeFood training focuses on many of the same topics as ServSafe®; however it is not a certifiable course. In small groups food service employees rotated between stations about hand washing and glove use, cross contamination, sanitizing, cooling techniques, and thermometer use. Again, the goal was to set the foundation for safely prepare local foods.
  • Local food service employees participated in a 5 th Season Workshop this past August. A 5 th Season Workshop is designed to teach food service staff how to prepare and store local foods. As the name implies, a “fifth season” refers to using excess vegetables at the end of the growing season and storing it for consumption later. North Winn. School hosted the workshop and kept several tubs of ratatouille, a dish consisting of eggplant, peppers, onions and tomatoes.
  • 13 teachers from area schools participated in a daylong Farm to School Workshop. They were exposed to ways of integrating food education across disciplines. Teachers were exposed to ways of improving student understanding of food and where it comes from.
  • The Northeast Iowa Farm to School program uses a unique and effective model called cross-age teaching. This model engages high school students to serve as Farm to School educators. Once a month for 20-40 minutes a group of 3-5 high school students teach 2 nd graders about a local food.   Over 65 high school students participated in the cross-age teacher training this past September. They teach lessons to over 500 lower elementary school students.   Explain what you see as the benefits of cross-age teaching are for both you and the students you teach.
  • What have you witnessed with the kids you’ve taught? [Recipients of the cross-age lessons sample and learn about local foods in a fun, supportive, and safe environment from older peer role models.]
  • Many schools in the region have started school gardens with support from FFI. In each community, different groups of people have helped in this grassroots effort. Each garden took unique form, based upon community input and existing resources. Some gardens were planted on school grounds, while others share a community space (Postville). One school is even partnering with the local hospital for space (Crestwood).   What have you witnessed at your school garden?   What are some proven benefits of a school garden? -Students gain an appreciation for their food and nature, which encourages environmental stewardship. -Gardens are a laboratory for experimental learning in many disciplines, including natural and social science, math, and language arts. -Gardening increases students’ preferences for vegetables/fruits and provides an opportunity for physical activity. -Students who garden experience improved attention and less behavioral problems. ( Source: http://web3.cas.usf.edu/tbsg/benefitsofschoolgardening.aspx )
  • FFI has provided assistance from a local horticulturist and mini-grants to help pay for tools, etc. Groups of students have been involved in the gardening process- from planning, to planting, to watering, to harvesting, to eating wholesome produce. For example in Postville, students planted seeds from Guatemala and Eastern Europe to represent the ethnic diversity at their school.
  • Clayton-Ridge School wasn’t a Farm to School pilot in 2009-2010, but they were so excited by the idea of a garden they started one. This year schools who complete the School Wellness Action Plan will have opportunities to start school gardens with FFI assistance.
  • These school gardens bring together communities and are a chance for place-based.
  • Regional leaders came together last fall for a Safe Routes to School Workshop
  • On October 6 2010, many schools across the world joined together to pledge allegiance to moving on International Walk to School Day!   Riceville’s Walk to School Day event also served as a kick-off for a new initiative: Walking Wednesdays. The first Wednesday of every month Riceville students and teachers will walk together. This event will continue through the winter months unless the temperatures dip below zero.   In West Union, over 580 students walked to school! An AmeriCorps VISTA member helped organized the event. In order to make it a successful event, he capitalized on relationships throughout West Union and got the police department, teachers, school administrators, crossing guards, and twenty volunteers involved!   Folks in Ossian were both up before dawn to get South Winneshiek’s Walk to School Day underway! Teachers wrote motivational notes on the sidewalk for the 300 students who walked to school from Carrie’s Park.   Overall, the International Walk to School Day was a great success! Parents and teachers witnessed how walking to school deepens relationships as well as enrich a child’s awareness in their community. Studies show that children who engage in 60 minutes or more of activity everyday perform better in school. The road has been paved: walking to school is fun!
  • Students at South Winneshiek Elementary hold up signs advocating walking to school.
  • Students at South Winneshiek Elementary used I-Walk to kick-off their “Walking Wednesday’s”
  • Decorah started a walking school bus with the help of volunteer parents.

FFI Presentation: School Focused FFI Presentation: School Focused Presentation Transcript

  • The Northeast Iowa Food & Fitness Initiative Insert school name Insert presenters’ names
  •  
  • Northeast Iowa is the only multi-county, rural Food & Fitness site : There are 9 WK Kellogg Food & Fitness sites throughout the United States Northeast Iowa Food & Fitness site includes: Allamakee, Clayton, Chickasaw, Fayette, Howard, Winneshiek counties
  • Source: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/trends.html Why does food and fitness matter? Reality in the U.S. Obesity Trends 1985 to 2009
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 ( *BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 ( *BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2008 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%
  • Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2009 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30 %
  • Reality in northeast Iowa: percentage of population overweight and obese Source: Iowa Department of Public Health Iowa Allamakee Clayton Fayette Howard Winneshiek Overweight 37.3% 38.2% 38.1% 37.8% 38.2% 35.9% Obese 22.5% 23.2% 23.2% 22.8% 23.0% 21.5%
  • Why school wellness matters…
    • Safe Routes
    • to
    • School
    • Farm to School
  • Celebrate schools in northeast Iowa!
  • Central High School, Elkader Iowa.
    • Milk
    • Salad, including cherry tomatoes & sweet peppers from local farm
    • Sliced apples from local orchard
    • Tortillas
    • Taco meat, provided by local farmer and parent of student
    • Dessert bar made with local squash
    North Winneshiek 2009 Homegrown School Lunch Menu:
  • Turkey Valley students show school spirit and eat a tasty homegrown school lunch in fall 2010.
  • Food service staff from Oelwein, Decorah, Postville, Starmont and Turkey Valley attended SafeFood in February, 2010.
  • August 2010, North Winneshiek Community School hosted a 5 th Season Workshop.
  • Farm to School Teacher Workshop included educators from Howard-Winneshiek, Decorah, Postville, Eastern Allamakee, and Turkey Valley Community Schools. The event took place in March.
  • The 2010 Cross-Age Teacher Training included students from Decorah, Cresco, Oelwein, Postville, Turkey Valley High Schools.
  • Postville students sampled local cheese for a cross-age teaching lesson.
  •  
  • School gardens in northeast Iowa.
  • Students have fun with zucchinis from the Clayton Ridge School Garden.
  • Turkey Valley students transplant tomatoes.
  •  
  • Students in West Union walk during school.
  • Students at South Winneshiek Elementary hold up signs advocating walking to school.
  • Walking to school in Riceville, Iowa.
  • Decorah students partake in a Walking School Bus