Every Step Counts

731 views

Published on

Every Step Counts

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
731
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Every Step Counts

  1. 1. EVERY STEP COUNTS What is it? Why do we or should we care?
  2. 2. CAROL M. WHITE FEDERAL GRANT OR THE P.E.P. (PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR PROGRESS) GRANT  To increase physical activity before, during and after school  To improve nutrition education  To provide professional development for physical educators
  3. 3. Why would the federal government grant almost one million dollars ($$$) to Traverse City, Michigan??
  4. 4. Michigan is the second fattest state in the nation Michigan children show elevated levels of high blood pressure, cholesterol, Type II diabetes Traverse City Area Schools showed 40% of K-6 students to be obese or at risk of being obese, according to BMI 40% of students randomly selected for cardio scores K-12 were below grade level
  5. 5. For the first time in the history of the USA, our children’s life expectancy is lower than their ours….and… Of children born in the year 2000 or after, 1 out of 3 will be diabetic; one out of two African-Americans will be diabetic
  6. 6. It’s really about one thing: COMMUNITY
  7. 7. Through the grant, we have the opportunity to:  Provide additional opportunities for physical activities before, during and after the school day (“Lunch Bunch” at the elem level, NAP at the secondary, intramurals)  The ability to open facilities on Saturdays and offer programming to both students and families  Equipment (climbing walls, heart rate monitors)  Professional development for PE staff  Partner with groups within the community who have a common vision: Let’s Get Moving; YMCA; Great Lakes Children’s Museum; Michigan Land Use Institute; Munson Hospital
  8. 8. Ultimately, this is not about TCAPS or Munson or Rotary or the Chamber. This is about all of us, coming together, to leave a legacy for our children of healthy lifestyle. We owe them that.
  9. 9. What can you do about nutrition? • Consider a comprehensive school health program and join Team Nutrition • Have someone on staff do HSAT training and administer it in your building • Work with food service to evaluate menu and nutritional components • Be involved in wellness policy • Consider healthy snack policy, removal of pop, water breaks, water sales • Cook training • Farm to School Program
  10. 10. What existing programs do you have to build on? • Scheduling • Lunch, after school, seminars, resource, study halls, intramurals, before school, Saturdays • Community programs needing facilities • Food service/nurses/nutritionists • Train after/before school staff through MSU extension services
  11. 11. What Models Can You Access? • Dr. Pat Cooper—Memphis, Mississippi • 80% free and reduced lunch • Poor, black district • Low test scores • Comprehensive school health program totally turned schools around, including test scores, but, more importantly, student health
  12. 12. Physical Activity as the Target for Prevention EffortsCVD Obesity Cancer Arthritis Diabetes Osteo- Kidney porosis Disease Injury Violence Prevention Prevention Mental Health
  13. 13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  14. 14. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  15. 15. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  16. 16. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  17. 17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  18. 18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  19. 19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  20. 20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999; 282:16.
  21. 21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 2000; 284:13.
  22. 22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) No Data <10% 10%-14% 15-19% 20% Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 2001; 286:10.
  23. 23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥ 30, or ~ 30 lbs overweight for 5’4” woman) Source: Mokdad A H, et al. J Am Med Assoc 1999;282:16, 2001;286:10.
  24. 24. Increasing Obesity Among Children % Troiano, RP & Flegal. (1998). Overweight Children and Adolescents: Description, Epidemiology, and Demographics. Pedriatrics, 10 (3), 497-504.
  25. 25. Overweight Children and Adolescents • More likely to become overweight or obese adults.
  26. 26. Increasing Obesity Among Children % Troiano, RP & Flegal. (1998). Overweight Children and Adolescents: Description, Epidemiology, and Demographics. Pedriatrics, 10 (3), 497-504.
  27. 27. Health Risks Associated with Obesity • Premature death • Type 2 diabetes • Heart disease • Stroke • Gallbladder disease • Osteoarthritis • Sleep apnea • Asthma • Breathing problems • High cholesterol • Surgical risk • Cancer (endometrial, colon, kidney, gallbladder, post-menopausal breast cancer)
  28. 28. Consider This •Health care costs are currently astoundingly high. •Imagine the economic reality when our overweight, inactive adolescents reach the workplace.
  29. 29. We need to be in this together… The whole community Every Step Counts Let’s Get Moving Munson, TCAPS, Rotary, Chamber Families
  30. 30. Saturday Program
  31. 31. Saturday Nutrition
  32. 32. Nutrition Education
  33. 33. Winter Family Fun
  34. 34. What has been done? • Through ESC grant programming, physical activity has been increased at all levels through NAP, Lunch Bunch, extended day programming, intramurals, special events • K-6 BMI (Body Mass Index) has decreased, an almost unheard of phenomena!! • Cardiorespiratory fitness testing has improved at almost every grade level
  35. 35. •NAP at all secondary buildings has been successful, particularly at those schools with closed campus. West Senior High has recorded numbers of over 400 students per day participating in extreme 4 square, basketball, dancedance revolution, swing dance and ping pong. • Training has been done with extended day programs and summer camp programs, providing increased activity and encouraging creative play. • Special events have included Rene Bibaub, world champion jump roper, who has performed at many area elementaries, high schools, Rotary and Chamber gatherings, as well as providing Inservice training for TCAPS PE staff; Rob Sweetgall, walking guru, who did a community walk, made appearances at schools and promoted the use of pedometers and walking as an affordable fitness activity; Friday Night Live appearances and Promotion through jumprope marathon and ddr
  36. 36. Professional Development • Physical educators have a captive audience. Quality PE CAN and DOES make a difference in fitness and lifestyle choices. • What was your experience with PE? • High school graduation requirements will seriously impact PE. Will our district and state DEMAND that health is a priority?
  37. 37. How About Nutrition? • TCAPS has hired a part-time nutritionist who has provided nutrition analysis of all TCAPS lunches available on TCAPS website • Many changes have been made within the lunch program, including whole wheat wraps, breads, pizza crusts, improved salad bars with mixed greens and veggies • Farm-to-School program has been implemented at several sites
  38. 38. Nutrition • TCAPS food service has created the first online bid service in the state for local farmers to try to purchase and use local, fresh food in school cafeterias • Vending machines have been stocked with water and flavored waters, reducing the opportunities for purchasing soda
  39. 39. Stuffee Program • In partnership with the Great Lakes Children Museum, ESC purchased literacy bags and offered this program to every first grade class in the TCAPS district • Program teaches about internal organs, healthy food choices, simple recipes for families to use and asks child to write about their experience with Stuffee
  40. 40. How to Sustain ESC? • The grant will end as of September 30 • What can this community do to sustain the good of the grant? • Do we value our health and that of our children enough to figure this out?
  41. 41. If you don’t take care of your body, where will you live? Once you lose your health, nothing else matters.
  42. 42. Here is the challenge! • Our children are dying from obesity, lack of activity, lack of creative play! • Our state needs to wake up and do something for the children! • The Traverse City community MUST step up and provide a model community in regards to healthy lifestyle. We must DEMAND that health is a priority in the schools and community. We have the chance. We have the choice. We have the responsibility.

×