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Ace open ended rubric strategy

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  • First of all, this is an amazing resource for ACE Strategies! I am currently enrolled in a grad school class where I am writing a paper on ACE strategies. Can you tell me where you found the information to put into your presentation?
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  • THERE HAVE BEEN SOME SCHOOLS IN NM WHO HAVE GIVEN A GREAT DEAL OF CREDIT TO ACE IN HELPING THEM MAKE AYP. I THINK ITS IMPORTANT THAT OUR SCHOOLS GET THIS TRAINING AS EARLY AS POSSIBLE IN THE YEAR. OTHER SCHOOL IN THE COUNTRY ALSO STRUGGLE WITH OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS AND HOW TO SCORE THEM SO THIS TRAINING WILL BE USEFUL AND CAN BE ADJUSTED FOR ANY STATE.
  •  Animated Slide THANKS TO JIM, MARILYN AND BRENDA FOR HELPING WITH THIS. Facilitator Notes: The workshop purpose and outcomes are stated as “Standard” and “Essential Knowledge and Skills” to parallel what teachers deal with in their classrooms. The facilitator will have the opportunity to model PDSA through the workshop process. Facilitators can use the essential knowledge and skills list as an opportunity to relate these workshop non-negotiables to non-negotiable state standards. Remind workshop participants that many times state standards and objectives need to be translated into learner-friendly terms. Ask table teams to “translate” this list into the key terms that are user-friendly to them. One table at a recent field test for GSWCI reported out that they did not need to translate - they understood the standard and essential knowledge and skills as written .
  •  Animated Slide Facilitator Notes: The workshop purpose and outcomes are stated as “Standard” and “Essential Knowledge and Skills” to parallel what teachers deal with in their classrooms. The facilitator will have the opportunity to model PDSA through the workshop process. Facilitators can use the essential knowledge and skills list as an opportunity to relate these workshop non-negotiables to non-negotiable state standards. Remind workshop participants that many times state standards and objectives need to be translated into learner-friendly terms. Ask table teams to “translate” this list into the key terms that are user-friendly to them. One table at a recent field test for GSWCI reported out that they did not need to translate - they understood the standard and essential knowledge and skills as written .
  • The next 14 slides were originally designed for New Mexico teachers in order to help them understand the configuration and scoring weight of the NMSBA. However, if you are working in another state, you might want to ask participants what kind of info they have about their state test and what implications that information might have for the classroom. If participants don’t know this info about their state’s test this is a segue into understanding that they need that information.
  • The next 12 slides are for New Mexico schools only. They are all specific to the NMSBA. This one gives an overall configuration for how the scores are “weighted” on the test. Note that the open-ended questions where the students have to perform a written response are very heavily weighted.
  • These slides were sent to me by Tom Ginne’. He works for RDA (Research and Development) in APS (Albuquerque Public Schools) and was on the design team for the NMSBA. When I worked in all 25 SINOI (schools in need of improvement) in APS I didn’t find one school that had this information.
  • Self-explanatory
  • I asked Tom to give me just ONE hint that would help teachers who are trying to prepare their students to take the test and the words in red are what he told me. When these slides were presented at Del Norte high school there is a teacher there who was on the scoring team and enthusiastically supported the statement. He said that is EXACTLY what they are asked to look for and award the most points for. I usually ask table groups here to have a 5 minute discussion about what implication these slides hold for their school and classrooms and report out to the group.
  • Math teachers are often surprised that so much weight is put on how students “write” an answer. The correct answer used to be the only goal and now students are being asked to construct a written response explaining the process they used and the rationale for using it to get their answers. This is upsetting to some math teachers, but also a great place to help them understand that they might need to “change” the way they have always done things and what they have expected from their students. Some DO understand here that they are “short-changing their students if they don’t.
  • Again, in red is what Tom Ginne told me would give the students the most points on math questions. I let them again have a table discussion here, report out.
  • Science still has a lot of weight on written responses, though not quite as much as reading and math.
  • The next 12 slides are dedicated to helping students construct effective written responses in reading. The same rubric works for science, social studies, history etc.
  • I came across this rubric when working with a group of teachers in Ohio. Their state test is very much like New Mexico’s and they were using this rubric from Pre-K to 12 th grade and were very enthusiastic about the results they were getting with their kids. It is the simplicity that they like so much. They said their students learned it very quickly. The gimmick also embraced by teachers and students is to “ACE” your answers. The example I use here was from my class. I didn’t get the rubric until March of the last year that I taught. When I came back from Ohio, I thought I would try using it with my first graders. We were doing a unit on Fairy Tales and so after we had read “The Three Bears”, I asked my kids if they thought Goldilocks was a good little girl or a naughty little girl. Most thought she was naughty. When I asked the class how they KNEW she was naughty some of the responses I got were………”Because I’m smart” or “The story tells you” or “It’s in my head” or “My mom told me” or “I just know it”. I was surprised that so many of my kids didn’t think to go back to the story and “reference” the things that she did that they thought were naughty. I’m usually told by mid and high school teachers that their students still do the same thing. Their answers are often… “just cuz”.
  • Some teachers appreciate getting this in Spanish also.
  • This is a template used by a primary teacher who was doing this orally with her students. She kept a folder on each student and when she had a small group for shared reading and she asked a student a question about the page they had read she would quickly record how they answered their questions. Eventually she started showing these pages to the students, which is when they became engaged in trying to “ACE” their answers. *Note that this was done several times weekly and didn’t take much time on the teachers part at all.
  • This is an example of how a pre-K teacher posted the data she was gathering about how her students ACE’d their reading questions. This was all done orally. NOTE: The short-term goal aligned with meeting their strategic goal. I often have more push-back from primary teachers thinking they can’t do this with their little ones so this example holds a lot of weight in realizing they can simply do this orally. I explain that it might also be appropriate for this class to keep their goal to a 2 all year. However, when you see how quickly their students learned to Answer and Cite, it made sense to this teacher to try to go further with them.
  • INTERMEDIATE EXAMPLE: This is how a 4 th grade teacher had her students track their data. Every Friday when she gives her weekly spelling tests she has an ACE question on the back of the test. Note that the goal here was to get a 2 first.
  • This is an example of an improvement plan made by the student based on the previous slide. Here I emphasize that the teacher was stucturing how to “expand” their answer for the class. She was teaching the “standards” of making personal connections and predictions for what the kids were reading. Her weekly PDSA’s were focused on having students demonstrate knowledge of these two standards through the expansion part of ACE. I emphasize here that without the student data to guide the way it is difficult for the students to make an improvement plan. This helps teachers who say “I do this all the time, I just don’t have my students keep the data on it”. Or, I do PDSA, I just don’t write it down.
  • HIGH SCHOOL EXAMPLE: How one high school teacher got started with one class. This ACE assessment was added to the quarterly SCA’s that the school was giving. We need to encourage teachers to do this more often than quarterly, but if they haven’t had CCI, I find it throws them into the “I can’t possibly do this weekly” mentality. This graph could be changed to say Week 1, 2, 3, 4.
  • Another example of how class data might be shared. This is baseline data from a teacher BEFORE she started using ACE and was so surprised that her students did so poorly on constructing an effective answer.
  • HIGH SCHOOL EXAMPLE: A data notebook from a HS Literature class. Students were scoring their own daily assignments and having peers score their assignments also. THEN, they got the weekly quiz that let them know how they were really doing. This can show teachers that they STUDENTS should be using the rubric and carrying half the load of scoring their own and each other’s papers.
  • An improvement plan based on the data in the previous slide. I once had a teacher say…. “That looks like so much work!” Then someone else pointed out…”Yes, but who’s doing the work?” It’s the student!!
  • Some teachers have asked for examples of what a good paper might look like so this is a primary one. I have had middle and high school teachers who said they have used this exact example to get their student started on what ACE looks like and found it very helpful even for their older kids. I also emphasize here that they will have their own class examples of effective papers after they start using this with their students.
  • A High school anchor paper that some have embraced. This is from an AP English class. Same process as first grade example.
  • Some teachers ask about scoring writing to a prompt and so I emphasize that ACE is a tool for scoring “open-ended” short answer and extended response questions. It does NOT replace their other writing rubrics. In “writing to a prompt” teachers should be using their “writing” rubrics…6-traits etc. that include the complete writing process. This is the 6-traits rubric used by PED in NM to score the writing prompt on the SBA. I emphasize here that their school writing rubrics school at the very least be aligned with this one. If you’re not in New Mexico, you still might show this and ask the participants if they know what rubric their state uses to score student’s writing to a prompt. I give groups time to discuss this as a table and report on “ah-ha’s”.
  • The next 10 slides are devoted to the use of ACE in math and is different from how it is used in other subject areas….at least in New Mexico.
  • Originally I only had ACE for “reading” but when a middle school saw the training their math teachers got together and re-worded it so that it could be used in math. I then expanded the training so that it included math.
  • I did this training for many months and for many schools before I found this rubric on the PED website. Before I got this, schools were using ACE in math just like in reading…awarding 1 point for each part…answer, compute, explain. Most math teachers embraced its simplicity and were happy to have something to score their open-ended questions. HOWEVER, I emphasize now that this is the rubric used by the state of NM to score those questions on the SBA and that schools should be using this to score their student work. I then point out that ACE can be used as a way for students to “organize” their answers and I’ll show examples later on how to do that. I point out here that the columns do align with ACE…the first devoted to the answer, the second to the computation or strategy used and the third to the written explanation of the student work. If you are not in NM, you might ask your schools if they have a math rubric to use. If not, they could get started using ACE with the 3-point system like reading. It might again be a segue for teachers to start seeking out what their state uses to score open-ended math questions. I used this training in Presidio, Texas and although their state test is all multiple choice, the teachers still embraced the use of ACE enthusiastically.
  • This is the same rubric in kid-friendly language. Even most high school teachers agree that their kids need this kind of language.
  • This is the rubric that Marty sent to all of us last year some time and I added it to this training. It uses the same language and point system that the NMSBA rubric uses. Most elementary and even some secondary teachers feel that this rubric is aligned and gives enough info for their kids to use and they certainly learn it more quickly in this form.
  • This is a primary example that shows how ACE is used to organize the answer, but the NMSBA rubric is used to score it. (It is fun to have a secondary teacher read the explanation..they sometimes struggle and primary teachers love it!) We usually have a discussion here about how this student had to start with the C and how he explains that in his answer. It actually shows two ways to get the answer. This is a good place to have primary teachers discuss the need to support test -prep even at a young age as well as teaching their students to “demonstrate” and explain that they understand the mathematical process being used. You can also demonstrate here that if the student had come up with the answer of 13, they still would have been awarded at least 2 points because of their computation and written explanation. I did this training at Tucumcari Middle School and worked with their 8 th grade teachers in the morning. One teacher quickly made an overhead of this slide, went to her classes in the afternoon and showed it to them. She then had them use the kid-friendly math rubric to score the problem. This is how she introduced ACE to her classes. She said they loved it and quickly grasped the concept.
  • This is a right or wrong answer. I explain here that if the child got the answer 13, they would be awarded no points. Sometimes teachers complain about “teaching to the test” and so much emphasis being put on testing. I have shown this slide and then asked the question………. “Let’s say the test didn’t exist…which math problem would be better for student learning…this one or the previous slide?”
  • This is a secondary example that again shows how to use ACE to “organize” the answer. We often have a discussion here about the second explanation. This might be how a higher level math student would get the answer…but they often would not or could not explain it because they can do this in their head. It’s important to emphasize that we need to help these students learn to explain their answers. Students like this often don’t see the need to explain their work.
  • One group of primary teachers developed this template to help their students organize their answers and to make sure they used all the parts of ACE. I observed a class at Navajo Elementary in Navajo, NM doing this lesson when I walked into their classroom. Most teachers LOVE this template and find the box to write the standard they are working on very helpful.
  • Another primary example. ..a good example of how these kind of problems really make the children think. In my experience, this training is very quickly and enthusiastically embraced by intermediate and secondary teachers but primary teachers struggle with the concept. We could use some more secondary examples though.
  • An example of how one teacher used a stacked bar graph to post their data.
  • A different way to post the data.
  • Example of a scatter matrix to display the data.
  • A 7 th grade teacher used this type of graph to track class data weekly.
  • A student data notebook template based on the NMSBA math rubric aligned with the class data from the previous slide.
  • This is a compilation of things that teachers have told me have helped to produce good results with their students. One middle school teacher went to a casino and asked them to save cards for her. She got all the aces and gave her students an ace card when they “ACED” a quiz. She attached some sort of incentive to the card collection and said her students became “manic” about collecting those cards. A kindergarten in a reservation school had a little ACE store where the kids could go and buy stuff with their “ACE” cards…that the teacher mimeographed.
  • After going through the slide show I have groups work together to discuss the questions on this slide. I then let them choose how they want to work…alone or with a grade level or department team. Sometimes the principals have an idea of how they want them to work. Sometimes I have them make a poster to share with the participants in a way that is conducive to the size of the group….with whole group, pair and share with individual or another team, gallery walk etc. I explain here how a PE teacher at a mid-school used ACE. He had a big ACE poster on the wall of the gym and here’s the example he gave…”After having a class play each other in basketball I ended the scrimmage 5 min. early and had the kids sit down on the floor. I told them that I don’t teach reading or writing but that I was going to support those two schools goals. I pointed to ACE and said “I know you’re using this in your other classes and we’ll use it in PE when we can. For A…who just won the game we played? For C…turn to someone next to you and cite evidence from the game that contributed to that team winning the game. For E…turn to someone else and discuss what might have happened to change the outcome of the game. An art teacher shared that she did something similar. When her students finished a project, she had them fill out a template like this… A…do you like your work? C…Cite evidence from the piece of work supporting your opinion of it E…what might you change to improve the work? She had them pair and share their work with another student. These two examples help engage those that struggle with how to use ACE if they don’t have a regular classroom.
  • After going through the slide show I have groups work together to discuss the questions on this slide. I then let them choose how they want to work…alone or with a grade level or department team. Sometimes the principals have an idea of how they want them to work. Sometimes I have them make a poster to share with the participants in a way that is conducive to the size of the group….with whole group, pair and share with individual or another team, gallery walk etc. I explain here how a PE teacher at a mid-school used ACE. He had a big ACE poster on the wall of the gym and here’s the example he gave…”After having a class play each other in basketball I ended the scrimmage 5 min. early and had the kids sit down on the floor. I told them that I don’t teach reading or writing but that I was going to support those two schools goals. I pointed to ACE and said “I know you’re using this in your other classes and we’ll use it in PE when we can. For A…who just won the game we played? For C…turn to someone next to you and cite evidence from the game that contributed to that team winning the game. For E…turn to someone else and discuss what might have happened to change the outcome of the game. An art teacher shared that she did something similar. When her students finished a project, she had them fill out a template like this… A…do you like your work? C…Cite evidence from the piece of work supporting your opinion of it E…what might you change to improve the work? She had them pair and share their work with another student. These two examples help engage those that struggle with how to use ACE if they don’t have a regular classroom.
  • I have given each teacher a blank of this and let them use it. Brenda and I gave each teacher one at our SQS SCA training and had them make individual classroom plans and then had them share what they had done and their results at the follow-up training. I have also had teams use the template from PDSA in Action and that is well-received also. MARTY AND I FOUND OUT THE IMPORTANCE OF FOLLOWING UP EFFECTIVELY WITH TEACHERS TO SEE WHAT THEY REALLY DID WITH THEIR PLAN. NAVAJO EXAMPLE….(SHOW PICTURES HERE)…JUST FOR TRAINERS.
  • This is the example template I show participants before they start working.
  • The following are slides of groups that worked together to put an implementation plan in place. These are three good examples of team work and so I usually share at least one or two of them…depending on the group
  • I LOVE the use of the standards in the expansion part of ACE in this example. The team that used this said they got fantastic results with their students.
  • I developed these slides after I saw Marty do this training as an SQS public workshop and also sat in on herTrain the Trainer. This might be something helpful and I made it an elementary example since the CCI uses a mid-school one. (Tara) I have not used these slides yet, but could be used for coaching after the teachers have had CCI or perhaps combined with it…whatever works?
  •  Animated Slide Facilitator Notes: Mark’s strategic learning goal meets all the requirements of the SMART criteria. I put the focus goal in red here to show that it is that measure that these slides will focus on. I would emphasize here that you might have several measures for the strategic goal.
  • Facilitator Notes: When Tara looked at the scores for her five periods of math, she saw that one class—3rd Period—seemed to have the most need for improvement. Because she is new to continuous improvement, she decided to learn how to apply PDSA by focusing on one class. In Tara’s school a strategic assessment is given each grading period to monitor progress toward meeting/exceeding the standards. Tara created a chart to graph these strategic assessment results throughout the school year for 3rd Period. Her goal is to be able to replicate the process with all five periods of math. Like Tara, you may decide to focus on one content area or one class period (specials or secondary) for the next grading period in which you will start using the PDSA Cycle to improve classroom learning. Like Tara, your goal should be to expand the use of PDSA to all content areas and/or classes that you teach.  
  • Facilitator Notes: I SAW THIS MISSION STATEMENT IN A CLASS AND THE KIDS WERE SOOOO ENGAGED IN IT. THE TEACHER SAID THEY CONTINUALLY TOLD EACH OTHER TO “JUST DO IT”. THIS IS ALIGNED TO NIKE’S MOTTO. The fourth item in Setting Classroom Learning Priorities introduces teachers to class/course/program mission statements as a leadership strategy for setting and communicating direction. After discussing the learning requirements for 8th grade math with her students and publishing them in student-friendly language, Tara engaged her students in writing a class mission statement. She used an affinity process to gather ideas and then had a team of students put the key themes into a statement. She also used a consensogram to measure and verify commitment to the mission. Note that missioning follows analysis of strategic learning results and translation of requirements into a strategic learning goal.  
  • Facilitator Notes: HERE IS AM FOCUSING ON ONLY THE OPEN-ENDED MEASURE FOR THE STRATEGIC GOAL. Participants can see that if they attend to the three ‘assignments’ introduced so far they might have a bulletin board that looks like Tara’s – a mission statement, at least one strategic learning goal, and a chart for monitoring progress toward the goal throughout the year.
  • Facilitator Notes: NOTE THE LINK TO THE CLASS MISSION STATEMENT. Plan asks what do we plan to learn this week (or 2-week, or month depending on the type of classroom)? Help participants see that in most cases, state standards are broken down into learning targets – objectives, grade level indicators, benchmarks are some of the terms different states use. Tara looked at the essential knowledge and skills learning targets in the Number, Number Sense and Operations standard and determined that her students must be able to “Use scientific notation to express large numbers and small numbers between 0 and 1 in order to meet or exceed 8th grade math standards.” She spent a class period defining what this skill looks like in action and shared a wide variety of examples with her students. She also shared with them how both she and the students know if they were competent in using scientific notation from the quiz they would take at the end of the week. Note: This is an operational definition. Directions for writing operational definitions can be found on page 68 of the participant workbook.  
  • Facilitator Notes: The Do element encourages teachers to give students a voice and a choice in how learning will happen. Tara used an affinity diagram to give her students input into how they would learn to use scientific notation. From that they developed an action plan for the next week. Coaching question – why would you want to post the Do list? You are documenting this process so kids can see it, talk about it, take ownership of it. It holds teacher and students accountable.  
  • Facilitator Notes: The analysis of quiz data also includes a plus/delta on what worked and what changes need to be made next week.  
  • HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF ONE OF MARK’S WEEKLY ASSESSMENTS AND A STUDENT ANSWER. I THOUGHT IT MIGHT FIT WELL HERE.
  • Facilitator Notes: Tara used the template on page 60 of the workbook as a graphic organizer for action planning. Reinforce the concept that ACT is an adjustment or refinement of the DO based on the data
  • At this point, Mark may not need to track weekly data on this process….but he would need to make sure that the quarterly SCA has open-ended questions to see that students are holding their knowledge. He might also want to do a monthly check.
  • I USUALLY MAKE A PACKET OF THESE TEMPLATES FOR EACH GRADE LEVEL OR DEPARTMENT TEAM. I WILL ALSO BURN THESE FOR THE SCHOOL TO USE.
  • THIS WAS DEVELOPED BY A SPECIAL ED TEAM BECAUSE THEY WANTED THEIR STUDENTS TO HAVE JUST A QUICK PARAGRAPH TO READ AND ONE QUESTION TO ANSWER. THEY ALSO SAID THEIR STUDENTS NEEDED THE STRUCTURE THAT THIS TEMPLATE GAVE THEM. I’VE HAD HS TEACHERS WHO LIKE IT ALSO AND SAID THEIR STUDENTS NEEDED IT AT FIRST ALSO.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ACESTRATEGY ACE THOSE ANSWERS!! 1
    • 2. Purpose: Gain an understanding of the ACE (Answer-Cite-Expand) method of developing and evaluating short answer, extended written responsesExpected Outcomes:• Understand the role of the ACE Strategy in helping students ‘show they know or can do’ the learning standards and how that might effect performance on the NMSBA• Strategies for engaging students in using the ACE Strategy in a variety of subjects to demonstrate learning in a short answer, extended written response.• Ability to use the rubric use as a learning process measure• Strategies for assisting students in identifying the ACE Strategy as a personal action step for improving personal learning processes.• Leave with a clear, step-by-step plan for implementation in the classroom. 2
    • 3. Purpose: Understanding and implementing use of the ACE rubric method of scoring open-ended questions in a classroom using a continuous improvement system.Expected Outcomes:• Rationale for using the ACE rubric to organize and score open- ended questions.• Understand the rubric’s role in facilitating and measuring learning of the standards• Understand how ACE is used differently in math than in other subjects.• Ability to align the rubric’s use as a measure for a strategic learning goal.• Ability to help students demonstrate application of their learning by consructing effective answers to open-ended questions.• Ability to develop personal action plans for using the rubric with on-going cycles of PDSA. 3
    • 4. TEST PREP How can I preparemy students for the State Test? 4
    • 5. The trend in nationalstandards-based testing is toremove the ability for kids to guess their answers! *They are being required to provide evidencefor how they got their answers *Tests are looking for application of learning *A great deal of effective writing is being requiredof our students. 5
    • 6. NMSBA Multiple Choice 70% of the test 50% of the scoring weightOpen-Ended Questions 30% of the test 50% of the scoring weight 6
    • 7. The New Standards Based AssessmentN E W M E X IC O Test architecture Scoring weight Grades 3-9 7
    • 8. The new Standards Based Assessment, Reading• Grade 3 and Grade 4 – MC = 39 items Scoring weight = 52% – OE (short response) = 10 items Scoring weight = 48% – OE (extended response) = 5 items• Grade 5 – MC = 42 items Scoring weight = 52% – OE (short response) = 10 items – OE (extended response) = 5 items Scoring weight = 48% 8
    • 9. The new Standards Based Assessment, Reading• Grade 6 – MC = 42 items Scoring weight = 54% – OE (short response) = 10 items Scoring weight = 46% – OE (extended response) = 5 items• Grade 7 – MC = 46 items Scoring weight = 54% – OE (short response) = 10 items – OE (extended response) = 5 items Scoring weight = 46% 9
    • 10. The new Standards Based Assessment, Reading• Grade 8 – MC = 48 items Scoring weight = 54% – OE (short response) = 10 items Scoring weight = – OE (extended response) = 5 items 46%• Grade 9 – MC = 47 items Scoring weight = 54% – OE (short response) = 10 items Scoring weight = 46% – OE (extended response) = 5 items 10
    • 11. Instructional Prep for Reading• Testing pattern consists of: – Read the passage – Answer the questions – Prepare short or extended narrative responses • Responses that score highest reference the passages 11
    • 12. The new Standards Based Assessment, Math• Grade 3 and Grade 4 MC = 47 items Scoring weight = 52% OE (short response) = 17 items for grade 3 18 for grade 4 Scoring weight = 48% OE (extended response) = 3 items• Grade 5 MC = 51 items Scoring weight = 49% OE (short response) = 18 items Scoring weight = 51% OE (extended response) = 4 items 12
    • 13. The new Standards Based Assessment, Math• Grade 6 – MC = 54 items Scoring weight = 49% – OE (short response) = 17 items Scoring weight = 51% – OE (extended response) = 4 items• Grade 7 – MC = 51 items Scoring weight = 48% – OE (short response) = 17 items Scoring weight = 52% – OE (extended response) = 5 items 13
    • 14. The new Standards Based Assessment, Math• Grade 8 – MC = 53 items Scoring weight = 48% – OE (short response) = 17 items – OE (extended response) = 5 items Scoring weight = 52%• Grade 9 – MC = 52 items Scoring weight = 49% – OE (short response) = 16 items – OE (extended response) = 5 items Scoring weight = 51% 14
    • 15. Instructional Prep for Math• Testing pattern consists of: – Read the problem – Examine the data (numerical, graphs, etc.) – Select answer choice or complete the graphic – Prepare narrative responses • Responses that score highest reference the rules of mathematics and/or the data in the problem and provide a logical rationale for solving the problem 15
    • 16. The new Standards Based Assessment, Science• Grade 6 – MC = 51 items Scoring weight = 59% – OE (short response) = 9 items Scoring weight = 41% – OE (extended response) = 4 items• Grade 7 – MC = 55 items Scoring weight = 59% – OE (short response) = 9 items – OE (extended response) = 4 items Scoring weight = 41% 16
    • 17. The new Standards Based Assessment, Science• Grade 8 – MC = 54 items Scoring weight = 58% – OE (short response) = 8 items Scoring weight = 42% – OE (extended response) = 5 items• Grade 9 – MC = 52 items Scoring weight = 58% – OE (short response) = 8 items Scoring weight = 42% – OE (extended response) = 5 items 17
    • 18. READING 18
    • 19. ACE StrategyA…Answer the question!C…Cite evidence from the text!E…Expand your answer! 19
    • 20. ACE StrategyA…Anotar la respuestaC…Contar evidencia del textoE…Extender tu respuesta 20
    • 21. Short Answer Responses Name: Pablo When answering short answer responses, use the ACE strategy: *A – answer the question *C – cite evidence from the story *E – expand your answer**You may receive a total of three points for each response. You need to keep track of yourprogress by recording your score on the grid. Put an  on your score for each assignment. A C EStory Date PointsBig Ben Nov. 3 Not Yet Not Yet Not Yet 0Polar Bear Nov. 7Floats X Not Yet Not Yet 1Who’s Your Nov. 11Momma? X X Not Yet 2Ten Apples Nov. 14Up on Top X X Not Yet 2Where Have Nov. 18You Been? X X X 3 …means the student could perform the expectation. 21
    • 22. STRATEGIC GOAL: All students will get a 3 on their reading questions by May 2007! 11 10 9 We can ACE it! Answer=1 point 8 Cite=1 point “Say why” 7 Expand=1 point “Tell more” 6 5 4 GOAL: In 5 weeks we will all be able to get a 2 on our 3 story questions. 2 1 PRE-K Class 22 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5
    • 23. How am I doing on ACEing my reading quizzes?________________3…I expandedmy answer…Iadded more. GOAL2…I could citeevidence tosupport myanswer1…I answeredthe question Xand got it right0…I didn’t getthe answercorrect Quiz 1 Quiz 2 Quiz 3 Quiz 4 Quiz 5 Quiz 6 Quiz 7 Quiz 8 Quiz 9 Quiz 10 23
    • 24. ACE IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR READING PLAN DOI want to improve my progres s I need to focus on expandingon A C E ing my reading my ans wers in A C E . I will writeques tions . I have had a s core of s omething about what I think2 for the las t 3 weeks and now will happen next in the s toryI want a 3. OR about how the s tory might remind me of s omething that happened to me. ACT STUDY x My plan worked Yea!! I finally got a 3. I know___I need a new plan how to do this now and s o I can jus t keep going. It helped a lot for my teacher to s how us how to expand in a certain way. 24
    • 25. How are we doing in meeting our ACE goal in 2nd period Social Studies? 100% 90% 80% S tu nt’s S co de re 70% 60% 1 Answer 50% 2 Answer & Cite 40% 3 Answer 30% Cite & Expand 20% 10% 0% Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter 1 2 3 4 GOAL: All students will make a 3 on our extended response questions 25 by May 2006
    • 26. How are we doing in ACE..ing our extended responses in Language Arts? 90 80 70 60 50 A 40 C 30 E 20 10 0 1st 2nd 3rd 4th period period period period A – Answers the question C – Cites evidence from the text E – Expands the answer*Percentage of students who are meeting ACE expectations 26
    • 27. * You may receive a total of OPEN -EN D ED R ES PON S ES 3 points per answer *Use the ACE strategy….A-Answer the question C-Cite evidence from the text High School Literature E-Expand your answer My Peer Teacher Assignment Date A C E Score Evaluator Score Score Macbeth, Monday Chpt. 3 Feb. 7 X 1 1 Macbeth, Thursday Chpt 4 Feb 10 X X 2 1 Friday QUIZ Feb 11 1 Macbeth Tues Chpt 5 Feb 15 X X 2 2 Macbeth Thurs Chpt 6 Feb 17 X X X 3 3 Friday QUIZ Feb 18 2 Macbeth Tues Chpt. 7 Feb 22 X X 2 Macbeth Thurs Chpt 8 Feb 24 X X X 3 2 Friday QUIZ Feb 25 2 27
    • 28. ACE IMPROVEMENT PLANName Jorge Martinez Date: Feb.14thSubject: Literature,2nd periodPLAN: I need to improve how I respond to open-ended questionsso that I can improve my reading comprehension, class grade and my score on the SBADO: I am good at answering the questions, but I’m not used to supporting my answerfrom what I read. I need to cite evidence from the text “every time” that supports how Igot my answer. I also need to expand my answer in a way that will add value to thewriting and not just ramble on and on. I need to re-read my work daily and use the ACEscoring guide to help me. I should underline the different parts of ACE as I do them.STUDY: I will re-check my plan in two weeks and see if it helped to bring up my score onthe next ACE quizzes.___My plan worked!___I need another improvement plan! 28
    • 29. ANCHOR What kind of girl was Goldilocks? PAPERA…Goldilocks was a very naughty little girl.C…I know she was naughty because she broke inthe Bear’s house, ate their food and broke theirchairs and stuff. That’s illegal and you could goto jail if you got caught.E…I bet Goldilocks’ mom is going to be mad ather when she gets home. She might get sent totime out. I have been naughty a few times.Sometimes I get caught and sometimes I getaway with it. 29
    • 30. ANCHORWhat kind of person was Amir from The Kite Runner? PAPER mir was a chicken, but he was also a good person. He was nory loyal friend, but he did have a conscience that bothered him e was a chicken because he was too afraid to stick up for hisnd Hassan because he Was only thinking of himself and how id he was of the bullies that were hurting Hassan. Then hemed Hassan for stealing his money so that he could get him t way. He wanted him to go away because his conscience bother every time he saw him. He felt so guilty for what he did tosan that he thought about it for the rest of his life. But in the escued Hassan’s son from the orphanage to make up for his p akes.don’t think I could ever do that to my friend. I know I would my friends, no matter what risk it would cause for me. I d rather be hurt than have no loyalty. Answer-Red Cite-Blue Expand-Green 30
    • 31. NM Standards-based rubric for Grades 4-9 Writing Prompt 4 points 3 points 2 points 1 point 0 pointsConventions Language skills Language skills support the Mistakes in grammar, successfully support meaning; several errors in mechanics & usage meaning; few if any errors some or all of: render writing in subject/verb agreement, subject/ verb agreement, incomprehensible modifiers, punctuation, modifiers, punctuation, capitals, or spelling capitals, spellingIdeas Addresses prompt Mostly address prompt Addresses some of the Addresses few parts of Shows no evidence of Stays fully on topic Stays mostly focused prompt prompt purposeful organizationOrganization Includes relevant Includes mostly relevant Addresses a broad topic or Severely digresses from Is incoherent information info focuses on a trivial point topic Provides main ideas & Has main idea, but Provides sketchy Includes much irrelevant specific, elaborated details are general, information that may be list- information details that move beyond obvious or brief like No main ideas or does not the obvious Includes intro, Begins or ends abruptly; support them; details may be Includes inviting intro, arrangement of ideas & arrangement of ideas is repetitious logical arrangement of conclusion; ideas may stilted or occasionally Begins abruptly with no intro ideas, & satisfying wander or be predictable random or conclusion; there is little or conclusions Provides some Rarely uses transitions no attempt to establish order Maintains a clear order connection between Does not connect ideas with transitions between ideas with few ideas. transitionsVoice Engaging Occasionally engaging Somewhat bland Bland Isolated words, phrases Accurate, precise Accurate but general General words that may Inaccurate or repetitive or random sentencesWord Choice vocabulary that is word choice appropriate include occasional errors in words choice that isVocabulary appropriate for audience for audience/purpose usage occasionally inappropriateSentence & purpose Use of precise and Few active verbs, but most for audience and purposeStructure Contains active/precise general words are imprecise or colorless Passive, colorless, or **Evidence of planningConventions verbs Familiar vocabulary w/ (is, did, go) imprecise verbs (list, web, outline) May use imagery, some striking language Familiar vocabulary & Vague language or frequent …1 point awardedPresentation figurative or striking Generally fluent with phrases cliches language occasional choppiness Variety of sentence Incomplete or rambling No evidence of Fluent, easy to read Some variety of beginnings, structure, or Simple, repetitive sentence planning Effective sentence variety sentence beginnings, length but rambling or beginning, structures and …0 points awarded Readable, neat, nearly structures and length choppy lengths or many sentences 31 error free Mostly readable & neat Readable, but somewhat combined needlessly sloppy Some unreadable parts
    • 32. MATH 32
    • 33. ACE StrategyA…Answer the problem!C…Compute your For Math work!E…Explain how you got your answer! 33
    • 34. ACE StrategyA…Anotar la respuestaC…Computar su For Math trabajoE…Explicar como resolvio el problema 34
    • 35. NMSBA RUBRIC FOR OPEN-ENDED ITEMS IN MATH Answer Compute Explain *Gives an incorrect *Offers no mathematical *Does not address the0 points response with no work understanding of the problem. shown. problem. *Offers a correct solution to *Contains numerous errors *Provides vagueEMERGING the problem with no in computation and interpretation to the supporting evidence, detail reasoning that detract from solution/explanation,1 point or explanation. the overall quality of the indicating little or no response. mathematical understanding of the task or concept. *Offers a partially correct *May show faulty reasoning *May demonstrate unclearNEARING answer that may contain leading to weak answers or communication in writing or flaws, indicating an conclusions. diagrams.PROFICIENT incomplete understanding *May demonstrate a poor of the task or concept.2 points understanding of relevant mathematical procedure or concepts. *Offers a generally correct *Gives evidence that an *Is clearly focused and well-PROFICIENT solution, but contains minor appropriate problem-solving organized but neglects flaws in reasoning or strategy was selected and some aspect of the3 points computation. implemented but may complete solution. contain minor errors that *Lacks significant detail to detract from the overall convey thorough quality of the response. understanding of the task. *Offers a correct solution *Gives evidence that an *Is clearly organized andADVANCED that is well supported by appropriate problem-solving focused and shows a well-developed, accurate strategy was implemented, mathematical4 points explanations. but may contain minor understanding of the task or errors that DO NOT detract concept. from the overall quality of *Contains sufficient the response 35 explanation to convey thorough understanding of
    • 36. NMSBA RUBRIC FOR OPEN-ENDED ITEMS IN MATH KID Answer Compute Explain LANGUAGE0 points *My answer was wrong. *I didn’t show my work. *I didn’t understand how to do the problem. *I didn’t write anything.EMERGING *I may have gotten the right answer, but didn’t *I made some mistakes and my reasoning wasn’t *I didn’t really understand the problem completely1 point show my work or explain anything. very clear and didn’t make much sense. and couldn’t explain how I got my answer very well.APPRENTICE *My answer may have been partly correct showing *My reasoning isn’t exactly clear and my *I could only explain a little bit about the2 points that I only understand part of the problem and answer is weak. *I didn’t understand how problem. *My writing doesn’t how to get the answer. to get the answer to this communicate how I got my problem very well. answer very well.PRACTITIONER *My answer is correct and my computation shows I *My strategy for getting the answer was logical. *My work is clear and focused but I may have3 points mostly understood how to get the answer. *I may have made mistakes, but they were left out a part of the explanation of my work. minor and didn’t detract *I could have included from the quality of my more detail in my answer. work.EXPERT *My answer is correct and clearly supported by *I used a great strategy. *I used high-level *My work and explanation is clearly organized,4 points detailed explanations. reasoning. focused and shows a mathematical *I used math rules to get my answer and explained understanding of the task them. or concept. *I explained ALL the steps for how I got my 36 answer.
    • 37. KID-FRIENDLY 4 POINT RUBRIC Your ADVANCED score:♦has enough details to show you understood the problem.♦is organized and complete.♦completely explains your ideas and math thinking.♦has a correct answer.************************************************************** Your PROFICIENT score:♦has some details to show you understood the problem.♦is mostly organized.♦explains your ideas and math thinking.♦has a correct answer.************************************************************** Your NEARLY PROFICIENT score:♦doesn’t have enough details to show you understood the problem.♦is unorganized and unclear.♦doesn’t clearly explain your ideas or math thinking♦has an answer that’s almost right.*************************************************************** Your EMERGING score:♦showed no details.♦doesn’t make sense.♦has no explanation of ideas or math thinking.♦has a wrong answer. 37
    • 38. PRIMARY MATH EXAMPLE Rubric Score 4-Advanced How many legs do two cows and 3 chickens have?A….14C… 4 + 4 + 2 + 2 + 2 = 14E… I droo the cowS and chix and then I cownted all the lags. And then I mad the ekwshun. Thas how I got my ansur. 38
    • 39. 4 a. 11 4 b. 14 2 c. 12 2 d. 13+2 39
    • 40. There are 29 NBL teams. Each team is allowed to have 12 active players and 3 on injured reserve. How many players are in the NBL at any one time? Rubric Score 4-AdvancedA…(Answer) 435 players SECONDARY EXAMPLEC… (Compute) or show your work X = (12+3) 29 29 X = (15) 29 x15 X = 435 145 29_E… (Explain) in writing. 435First, I figured out that each team was allowed to have 12 players plus 3 who were hurtand that equals 15 total players on each team. Then I multiplied the sum by 29 to getmy answer of 435. I showed my work in an algebraic equation.OR…You could round 29 up to 30 and multiply by 15 to get 450. Then you would subtract a 40group of 15 from 450 to get the same answer…435.
    • 41. NMSBA Rubric First Grade Example Score _4__Standard: Number Sense and Operations.Grade Level Indicator: Understanding the meaning of numbersQuestion: Pick any 5 numbers from 1-10. Show how many apples would makeeach number? Answer Computation: Explanation: I drod the nmbz I pict ffrst tin I mad the apls to go wet the picchur ov it I chk my wrk bi conteng the apls to be sur. 41
    • 42. Name: Elena ACE…..your math questions Grade: Kindergarten Score…4, AdvancedAnswer: Computation:STANDARD: Number Sense Grade Level “Power” Standard: One-to-One Correspondence:Marco has the same number of cookies as he does fingers. How many cookies does he have?Explanation: Student told teacher… “I knew theanswer because I have five fingers and that makesfive cookies. I drew my hand and then I made mypretty fingernails and I made a cookie for eachfinger. I counted the cookies to check” 42
    • 43. How are we doing in meeting our math goal? 100% 90% 80% 70% 4 60% 3 50% 40% 2 30% 1 20% 10% 0% 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th QtrGOAL: 100% of the students will achieve a 3 or 4 Rubric Score on our extended response questions by the end of the year. 43
    • 44. Is our class improving on Extended Response Tests in Math? 70 60 50 Scoring 4 40 Scoring 3 30 Scoring 2 20 Scoring 1 10 0 Test 1 Test 2 Test 3 Test 4 GOAL: All students in our class will score a 3 or 4 on the math rubric by May 2007! 44
    • 45. HOW MANY STUDENTS ARE MEETING OUR ACE GOAL? “MATH” PROBLEM SOLVING GRAPH ACE ITAdvanced 4 GOALProficient 3NearingProficient 2Emerging 1 Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 45
    • 46. GOAL: All 7th grade math students will “ACE” our math questions by getting a 3 or 4 on our math rubric. We will all accomplish this goal by the end of the semester. The Num ber of Students w ith a 3 or higher on our w eekly open-ended quiz. 30 25 # of Students 20 15 10 5 0 WEEK 1 2 3 4 5 6 Problem Series1 Terrific 12 Tiles Harvest 15 Dinner Height 23 Dilemma Tale of 25 the Scale Gears 24 Sink or 25 Swim Week 46
    • 47. Jimmy Carter MS “MATH” PROBLEM SOLVING GRAPHAdvanced 4 GOALProficient 3NearingProficient X 2Emerging 1 Terrific Harvest Height Tale of Gears Sink or Connect Tiles Dinner Dilemma the Swim It Scale 47
    • 48. Jimmy Carter Middle School Class Plus/Delta after 4 weeks + ∆TEACHER EXPLAINS PROBLEM AND WE NEED TO CONCENTRATEHELPS US UNDERSTAND BEING LAZYWE UNDERLINE IMPORTANTINFORMATION NOT TAKING THE PROBLEMS SERIOUSLYRUBRIC WE NEED MORE “P’S”CHARTING OUR RESULTS IN DATA WE HAVE TO WRITE BETTERFOLDERS EXPLANATIONS OF HOW WE SOLVED THE PROBLEMREAD AND RE-READ WRITE OUT EVERY STEP2 DAYS TO COMPLETE PROBLEM PAY ATTENTION WHEN THE PROBLEM ISQUIET BEING EXPLAINED AND TAKE NOTESBENCHMARK PAPERS WE NEED TO DO WHAT OUR “DO” SAYSLOOKING AT PREVIOUS PAPERS TO ON THE PDSALEARN FROM MISTAKES WE WANT TO WORK IN GROUPS TOPEER SCORING PRACTICETAKING OUR TIMEUSING OUR TIME TO WORK ON THEPROBLEM 48DO PROBLEM STEP BY STEP
    • 49. Things that have “WORKED” with kids*Post it in your room*Teach it to your kids*Remind them why it’s important*Have them use the check-sheets on each reading/writingassignment*Have them assess themselves regularly*Have them chart their progress*Use peer evaluators*Show “benchmark” papers…what it really looks like tomake a 3.*Check on their scores periodically*Give a weekly “assessment”*Post the “class” data from the assessment*Attach a gimmick…(collecting ACE cards) 49
    • 50. You will need to designate ACTIVITY the following for Your team… *Facilitator *Recorder *Reporter*Work with your grade level or department team*TOGETHER, brainstorm possibilities to answer the following…*Are you already using ACE? If so, how?*If not, how could you use this rubric in your classroom or department?*How can it help you meet your class strategic learning goals*How might it help you with processes you are already using in your class?*How will you get your kids engaged in this process?*How will you use some of the materials presented?ASSIGNMENT:*Make a sample PDSA chart that you think you could use in your class ordepartment that would reflect learning toward ACE.*What tools would you use to monitor progress? i.e. bar graph, stacked-bar graph, scattergram, line graph, other?? 50*Be ready to share your plans.
    • 51. You will need to designate ACTIVITY the following for Your team… *Facilitator *Recorder *Reporter*Work with your team*TOGETHER, brainstorm possibilities to answer the following…*Are you already using ACE? If so, how?*Are you getting student achievement results from this strategy?*If so, how do you know?ASSIGNMENT:*Decide on a plan to deploy or further implement use of the ACE strategy atyour school.*If not, how could you use this strategy in your school?*How can it help you meet your EPSS goals?*How might it help your teachers with processes they are alreadyusing intheir classrooms?*How will you get your staff engaged in the use of this strategy?*How will you use some of the materials presented? 51ASSIGNMENT:
    • 52. ASSIGNMENT PLAN DOHow will you use ACE What will you do eachin your classroom? week for four weeks? ACT STUDY How will you visually monitor progress? 52
    • 53. PLAN DO Week 1…Give a baseline quiz, Post ACE, I will implement the teach it to my kids, Give ACEuse of ACE in my assignments, establish a goal. Week 2…Show anchor papers, use peerclass. evaluators, give 3 assignments, Give quiz. Week 3… The kids will need to Week 4… have input here. ACT STUDY How are we doing? What’s working? What’s not working? What do we need to change in order to get better next week? Wk. 1 Wk. 2 Wk. 3 Wk. 4 53
    • 54. PLAN DO *We will divide the stories in our reading series We will implement the equally among us, starting with the book we are currently teaching. use of ACE in our *Each teacher will design an ACE lesson for the stories assigned to us. classrooms. *We will COPY the lessons and share them among our team. *Our students will then have an ACE assignment each week. *We will monitor progress toward meeting a score of a 2 first and then move toward teaching students to expand and meet a score of a 3. ACT STUDY How are we doing? What’s working? What’s not working? What do we need to change in order to get better next week?ELEMENTARY GradeLevel “Team” EXAMPLE Wk. 1 Wk. 2 Wk. 3 Wk. 4 54
    • 55. PLAN DO *We will first teach our students how to answer We will implement the the question and site evidence from the text to support how they got their answers. use of ACE in our *After they have demonstrated learning of those two skills we will begin to teach them to classrooms. effectively expand their answers. *We will go through the language arts standards and divide them among us. *Each teacher will take a standard and design 5 questions that will facilitate the use of that standard in the expansion part of ACE. *We will share those lessons among our team so all students will benefit from the lessons. ACT STUDY How are we doing? What’s working? What’s not working? What do we need to change in order to get better next week?SECONDARY “LanguageArts” Team EXAMPLE Wk. 1 Wk. 2 Wk. 3 Wk. 4 55
    • 56. PLAN DO *We will divide the math standards equally among us.We will implement the *Each teacher will design 1 ACE lesson for the standard assigned to us. use of ACE into our *We will COPY the lessons and share them among our teammath instruction. *Our students will then have an ACE assignment for each math standard. *We will use the NMSBA rubric to score these lessons, making sure that we teach it to our kids. *We will monitor progress toward meeting a score of a 3 (proficient) first and then move toward teaching students to construct advanced answers and meet a score of a 4. ACT STUDY How are we doing? What’s working? What’s not working? What do we need to change in order to get better next week? MATH EXAMPLE “Teacher Team” Wk. 1 Wk. 2 Wk. 3 Wk. 4 56
    • 57. Connecting To CCI 57
    • 58. Workbook Page 18 Setting Classroom Learning Priorities Publishing and posting strategic learning goals… Mark’s strategic learning goal100% of our class will meet or exceed the 3rd grade math standards by May 2007… Our Measures: *Scoring 80% or better on our school SCA Math Test *Scoring 80% or better on our Chapter Tests *Reaching a rubric score of proficient (3) or higher on opened-ended math questions. 58
    • 59. Workbook Page 20 Setting Classroom Learning Priorities Charting strategic learning results Create a graph for charting classroom learning results beginning with where the class is starting compared to where it needs to be. Chart this performance level as a percentage. This is called establishing the baseline. % of class getting a 3 or higher on the 3rd Grade Math Open-ended Assessment Results 100 90 Mark’s chart of 80 strategic 70 Math Rubric baseline data 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 Grading Pe riod 59
    • 60. Workbook Page 22 Setting Classroom Learning Priorities Developing a Class/Course/Program Mission Statement Work with students to develop a class/course/program mission statement that aligns to learning requirements and reflects a commitment to closing the achievement gap. Our class will work together to be ready for 4th grade. We will JUST DO IT!! Mark’s class Degree of Commitment to our Mission mission statement and consensogram of commitment 0 1 2 360
    • 61. Workbook Page 24 3rd Grade Math PDSA Board Our class will work together to be ready for 4th grade. We will JUST DO IT!! 3rd Grade Math Learning Goal 3rd Period Math Be nchm ark As s es s m e nt Re sults100% of our class will meet or exceed the 3rd 1 00 90grade math standards by May 2007… 80 70 60 …as measured by… 50 40*Reaching a score of proficient (3) or 30 20 10 higher on our open-ended math 0 1 2 3 4 questions. G r a d i ng P e r i o d Now he and his students are ready to use the Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle to focus on the learning processes that will help them achieve their goal. 61
    • 62. Workbook Page 26 PLAN - What do we plan to learn? PLAN Our learning target (standard) for this week:Mark’s PLAN for Week 1 Identify the relationships among after common factors and multiplesbaseline quiz We’ll take a quiz on Friday that lets us demonstrate our understanding. A score of 3 or better on our math rubric shows we “Just Did It!” 62
    • 63. Workbook Page 28 DO - What will we do to learn it? DO Ways to Learn Factors and Next week the teacher will: Multiples Mark’s DO • Demonstrate how to score our Stud for Week 1 problems using the rubric. y Practic e rubr the • Give us lots of examples of ic s o do with a we k no Let us ur factors and multiples for buddy what w o one on n looks it e common numbers. like own th k we che c • Let us do the problems in Work in a groups Let t Show small group who hose Next week students will: g u more s shar et it • Listen carefully when the e Don’t go they howe xa m ples too fast do it teacher shares examples • “Buddy” score using the rubric to score our daily problems. • Cooperate with our group 63
    • 64. Workbook Page 31 STUDY - What do our results tell us? + ∆ Strengths of our learning Changes we need to make next processes weekThe examples helped a lot Our buddy scores weren’t  that good, so we need moreWe really like practicing with practice with the rubric.a friend to get used to using  the rubric We think using manipulatives  might helpThe group practice helped us Some were slackers in their group More of Mark’sRx STUDY*More explanation on the rubric! for Week 1*Get out & distribute the manipulaives!*Everyone needs to do their PART! 64
    • 65. *MARK’S QUICK ASSESSMENT FOR THE WEEK NMSBA Rubric Score _4__Standard: Numerical Concepts & Mathematical Operations.Grade Level Indicator:: #4… Identify the relationship among commonly encountered factors and multiples.Question: What are the different factors of the number 12? Answer: Computation: 1x12, 12x1 2x6, 6x2 3x4, 4x3 Anchor Paper Explanation: First I got 12 counters and I knew that was one group of 12. Then I divided the counters in half and that was 2 sets of 6. Then I put them in groups of 4 and that was 3 sets. Then I just reversed the numbers in each problem and got my answer. 65
    • 66. Workbook Page 34 ACT - What will we do differently next week? ACT Mark’s OUR ACTION PLANACT for We studied our results for this week, 9/1 to 9/5.Week 1 __We improved. ____ We did not improve. Next week our teacher will do the following things differently: •Let us work with him to develop a rubric for working with a group •Keep giving us examples of proficient on the rubric. •Get the manipulatives out for us. Next week students will do the following things differently: •Use the Group Time rubric to make sure we aren’t slacking. •Pass out and use the manipulatives to practice our problems. •Keep working with the rubric to buddy-score We will look at our new results next week to see if our plan worked! 66
    • 67. OUR CLASS GOAL 100% of students will meet or exceed learning of the 3rd grade math standards MEASURE: Meeting a score of 3 or higher on the math rubric Mark’s Data Percentage of Students meeting Goal Comprehension Checksat the end of 100 the quarter 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Week 67
    • 68. TEMPLATES 68
    • 69. Short Answer Responses When answering short answer responses, use the ACE strategy: *A – answer the question *C – cite evidence from the text *E – extend your answer**You may receive a total of three points for each response. You need to keep track of yourprogress by recording your score on the grid. Put an x on your score for each assignment. A C EStory Date Points *Check means the student could perform 69 the expectation.
    • 70. NMSBA Rubric ACE…..your math questions Score ____Standard:_______________________Benchmark:_____________________Question:_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Answer: Computation:Explanation:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 70
    • 71. How am I doing in ACEing my reading quizzes3…I explainedmy answer…Iadded more.2…I could citeevidence tosupport myanswer.1…I answeredthe question andgot it right.0…I didn’t getthe correctanswer.Quiz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 71
    • 72. ACE IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR READING PLAN DO ACT STUDY___My plan worked___I need a new plan 72
    • 73. u m a y re c e i ve a to ta l o f S H OR T A N S WER R ES PON S ES p o i n ts p e r a n s w e r *U se the A CE strate ….A -A nswr the q e n gy e u stio C-Cite e ide fro the te t v nce m x E-Expand y u answr or e My Peer Teacher Assignment Date A C E Score Evaluator Score Score 73
    • 74. ACE Improvement PlanName_____________ Date____________Subject____________PLAN:_________________________________________DO:_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________STUDY:______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________My plan worked!___I need another improvement plan! 74
    • 75. ACE ASSIGNMENTPassage to read…. Question to answer…A______________________________________________________________________________C______________________________________________________________________________E______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 75
    • 76. “MATH” PROBLEM SOLVING GRAPHAdvanced 4 GOALProficient 3NearingProficient 2Emerging 1 Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 76
    • 77. ________________________________________ STUDENT SELF-EVALUATION OR PEER SCORING GUIDE ACE Score-___I answered the question…………………….___yes ___noI supported my answer from the text…..___yes___noI expanded my answer……………………………….___yes___noName____________________________________________________________ ACE Score-___I answered the question……………………………___yes___noI supported my answer from the text…..___yes___noI expanded my answer……………………………….___yes___noName____________________________________________________________ 77