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04 Client Server Technology
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04 Client Server Technology

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Database Management System

Database Management System

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  • 1. Ins to FOR-IAN V. SANDOVAL truc r: ls u_it@ ya o o p ho .c m fvs nd va ya o o a o l@ ho .c m
  • 2.  Client-server computing or networking is a distributed application architecture that partitions tasks or work loads between service providers (servers) and service requesters, called clients.  Often clients and servers operate over a computer network on separate hardware  A server is a high-performance host that is a registering unit and shares its resources with clients.
  • 3.  A client does not share any of its resources, but requests a server's content or service function.  Client-server describes the relationship between two computer programs in which one program, the client program, makes a service request to another, the server program.  Standard networked functions such as email exchange, web access and database access, are based on the client-server model.
  • 4.  The client-server model has become one of the central ideas of network computing. .  Many business applications being written today use the client-server model.  Each instance of the client software can send data requests to one or more connected servers. In turn, the servers can accept these requests, process them, and return the requested information to the client.
  • 5. 1. Clients 2. Servers  This typ o a hite ture is s m tim s re rre to a e f rc c o e e fe d s two-tier.  It allows devices to share files and resources.  The interaction between client and server is often described using sequence diagrams. Sequence diagrams are standardized in the Unified Modeling Language.
  • 6. 1. Web Browsers 2. E-mail Client 3. Online Chat Client
  • 7. 1. Web Servers 2. FTP Servers 3. Application Servers 4. Database Servers 5. Name Servers 6. Mail Servers 7. Print Servers 8. Terminal Servers
  • 8.  Another type of network architecture is known as peer-to-peer, because each host or instance of the program can simultaneously act as both a client and a server, and because each has equivalent responsibilities and status. Peer-to- peer architectures are often abbreviated by P2P.
  • 9.  Another type of network architecture is known as peer-to-peer, because each host or instance of the program can simultaneously act as both a client and a server, and because each has equivalent responsibilities and status. Peer-to- peer architectures are often abbreviated by P2P.  Both client-server and P2P architectures are in wide usage today. Details may be found in Comparison of Centralized (Client-Server) and Decentralized (Peer-to-Peer) Networking.
  • 10.  While classic client-server architecture requires one of the communication endpoints to act as a server, which is much harder to implement, Client-Queue-Client allows all endpoints to be simple clients, while the server consists of some external software, which also acts as passive queue (one software instance passes its query to another instance to queue, e.g. database, and then this other instance pulls it from database, makes a response, passes it to database etc.).
  • 11. 1. A client-server architecture enables the roles and responsibilities of a computing system to be distributed among several independent computers that are known to each other only through a network. 2. All the data is stored on the servers, which generally have far greater security controls than most clients. 3. Since data storage is centralized, updates to that data are far easier to administer than what would be possible under a P2P paradigm.
  • 12. 4. Many mature client-server technologies are already available which were designed to ensure security, friendliness of the user interface, and ease of use. 5. It functions with multiple different clients of different capabilities.
  • 13. 1. Traffic congestion on the network has been an issue since the inception of the client-server paradigm. 2. The client-server paradigm lacks the robustness of a good P2P network.
  • 14. Computer networks can be classified into two broad categories: 1. Local Area Network A LAN is a communications network enables data exchange between devices within a small geographic area. Here, devices mostly refer to computers and peripheral devices such as printer. 2. Wide Area Network A WAN usually consists of a local connection of LANs and spreads over a much larger geographical area, sometimes even spanning the globe.
  • 15.  The Open Systems Interconnection Reference Model (OSI Reference Model or OSI Model) is an abstract description for layered communications and computer network protocol design.  It was developed as part of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) initiative.  It divides network architecture into seven layers which, from top to bottom
  • 16. 1. Physical 2. Data Link 3. Network 4. Transport 5. Session 6. Presentation 7. Application
  • 17.  A layer is a collection of conceptually similar functions that provide services to the layer above it and receives service from the layer below it.  On each layer an instance provides services to the instances at the layer above and requests service from the layer below.  Conceptionally two instances at one layer are connected by a horizontal protocol connection on that layer.
  • 18. - 19 w rk o ala re m d l o ne o a hite ture 77, o n ye d o e f tw rk rc c w ss rte a theInte tio l Org niza n fo a ta d nd rna na a tio r Sta a iza n (ISO) b g n tod ve p itsOSI nd rd tio ea e lo fra e o a hite ture m w rk rc c - tw m jo c m o nts a a s c m d l o ne o o a r o p ne : n b tra t o e f tw rking , c lle theBa icRe re eMo e o s ve ye m d l, a d s fe nc d l r e n-la r o e a as t o s e ificp to o nd e f p c ro c ls - All a p c o OSI d s n e lve fro e e nc sw s e ts f e ig vo d m xp rie e ith theC LADES ne o w h a o influe e Inte t YC tw rk, hic ls nc d rne d s n. e ig
  • 19. - In ISO 74 8Mo e ne d s n w sd c e d a the 9 d l w e ig a o um nte nd ne o tw rkings te isd e into la rs ys m ivid d ye . - Oneo m ree r o ntitie im le e itsfunc na a e c s p m nt tio lity nd a h e ntity inte c d c o w thela r im e ia ly ra ts ire tly nly ith ye m d te b ne th it, a p vid sfa ilitie fo us b thela r e a nd ro e c s r e y ye a o it. b ve - P to o e b a e ro c ls na le n ntity in o ho t tointe c w a ne s ra t ith c rre p nd e o s o ing ntity a thes m la r in a the ho t. t a e ye no r s
  • 20.  TheP ic l La r isthefirs a lo e t la r in the hys a ye t nd w s ye s ve ye OSI m d l o c m ute ne o e n-la r o e f o p r tw rking.  TheP ic l La r c m ris stheb s ha w re hys a ye o p e a ic rd a tra m s n te hno g so ane o ns is io c lo ie f tw rk.  TheP ic l La r d fine them a o tra m hys a ye e s e ns f ns itting ra b ra r tha lo ic l d tap c tso r ap ic l w its the n g a a a ke ve hys a link c nne tingne o no e . o c tw rk d s  TheP ic l La r p vid sa e c a m c nic l, hys a ye ro e n le tric l, e ha a a p c d l inte c tothetra m s n m d . nd ro e ura rfa e ns is io e ium
  • 21. 1. Tra m s n fo a w h c n b e r d ita o ns is io rm t, hic a e ithe ig l r a lo . na g 2 P ic l tra m s n m d , w h re rs to w the . hys a ns is io e ium hic fe he r b o d ta a tra m d a e c a o o tic l its f a re ns itte s le tric l r p a 3 s na e o ing w h e p s s w t s na p tte . Da lsnc d , hic m ha ize ha ig l a rns igta . re re e o s a ze e a the s hro tio p s nt ne nd ro s nd ync niza n b tw e s nd a re e e e n e ing nd c ivingd vic s e e. 4 P ic l m d . hys a e ium a c e w h d a w w tta hm nt, hic e ls ith iring a p la utsc nne to . nd in yo o c rs
  • 22.  V.9 te p nene o m d m 2 le ho tw rk o e s  IRDA P ic l La r hys a ye  USB P ic l La r hys a ye  Fire ire w  EIA RS-2 2 EIA-4 2 EIA-4 3 RS-4 9 RS-4 5 3, 2, 2, 4, 8  ITU Re o m nd tio : s eITU-T c m e a ns e  DSL  ISDN  T1 a o r T-c rrie links a E1 a o r E- nd the a r , nd nd the c rrie links a r
  • 23.  10BASE-T, 10 BASE2 10 , BASE5 10 BASE-TX, , 0 10 BASE-FX, 10 BASE-T, 10 0 0 0 0 BASE-T, 10 0 0 BASE-SX a o r va tie o theEthe t nd the rie s f rne p ic l la r hys a ye  Va tie o 8 2 rie s f 0 .11  SONET/SDH  GSM Umra io inte c p ic l la r d rfa e hys a ye  Blue o P ic l La r to th hys a ye  IEEE 8 20 .11x W P ic l La rs i-Fi hys a ye  Tra fe e P ic l La r ns rJ t hys a ye  Ethe o rlo p  ARINC 8 Avio sDig l Vid o Bus 18 nic ita e
  • 24.  Ne o tra fe d tain “hunks o p c ts o a tw rks ns r a c ” r a ke , f c rta s e in ize  Da link la r fo sd tap c ts ta ye rm a a ke  Ma g sthe m ve e a e c no ein thene o na e ir o m nt t a h d tw rk  Ad sthea p p tea d s e o thes urc a d p ro ria d re s s f o e nd d s tio no e e tina n d s  In P -b s d LANs it isa thisla r tha p to o like C ae , t ye t ro c ls To n Ringa Ethe t a im le e d ke nd rne re p m nte  Func nsa o n p rfo e b ne o inte c tio re fte e rm d y tw rk rfa e c rd (NIC ) ins lle in c m ute a s s ta d o p rs
  • 25.  Ne o La r p vid sthefunc na a p c d l tw rk ye ro e tio l nd ro e ura m a o tra fe e ns f ns rringva b le th d tas q nc s ria le ng a e ue e fro as urc toad s tio viao o m rene o m o e e tina n ne r o tw rks  P rfo sne o ro e rm tw rk utingfunc ns fra m nta n, tio , g e tio re s e b a re o d live e r re o a s m ly, nd p rt e ry rro p rts  Ro rso e tea thisla r— s nd d tathro ho ute p ra t ye e ing a ug ut thee nd d ne o a m kingtheInte t p s ib xte e tw rk nd a rne o s le  Thelo ic l a d s ings he eishie rc a g a d re s c m ra hic l  TheInte t P to o (IP istheb s kno n e m le o rne ro c l ) et w xa p s f La r 3 ye
  • 26.  TheTra p rt La r c ntro there b ns o ye o ls lia ility o ag n f ive link thro h flo ug w c ntro o l, s g e tio e m nta n/ d s g e tio e e m nta n,  a ic l rxantro so La r 4a theTra m s n Typea ec m le f ye re nd rro o p l ns is io C ntro P to o (TC ) a Us r Da g mP to o o l ro c l P nd e ta ra ro c l (UDP )  Fivec s e o c nne tio o etra p rt p to o la s s f o c n-m d ns o ro c ls ra ingfro c s 0to c s 4 ng m la s la s
  • 27. Table 4.1 - Detailed characteristics of TP0-4 classes
  • 28.  Re p ns lefo e ta lis s o ib r s b hingvirtua c nne tio b tw e l o c ns e e n p c s e runningo d re c m ute ro e s s n iffe nt o p rs  Co c n isc lle as s io nne tio a d es n  P g m e inte c to thene o ro ra m rs rfa e tw rk  It ha le func nss h na ere o nitio nd s tio uc m c g n, a m tra n, a s c d inis tio nd e urity in ane o tw rk  NetBIOS Exte e Us r Inte c (NETBEUI) is nd d e rfa e c m o us d p to o fo thes s io la r o m nly e ro c l r e s n ye
  • 29.  Re p ns lefo thed live a fo a s o ib r e ry nd rm ttingof info a n to thea p a n la r fo furthe rm tio p lic tio ye r r p c s ingo d p y ro e s r is la  Tra fo thefo a s nt b thea p a n la r into a ns rm rm t e y p lic tio ye c m o fo a o m n rm t  Tra la sthec m o fo a to afo a c s n b a ns te o m n rm t rm t ho e y a p a n la r p lic tio ye  Te ina e ula n isp rfo e a thisla r rm l m tio e rm d t ye  Thelo e t la r a w h a p a n p g m e w s ye t hic p lic tio ro ra m rs c ns e d tas turea p s nta n, ins a o o id r a truc nd re e tio te d f s p s nd d tain fo o d ta ra so p c ts im ly e ing a rm f a g m r a ke b tw e ho ts e en s
  • 30.  Ne o Op ra tw rk e tingSys m(NOS) s ftw rere id sa te o a s e t thisla r ye  NOS s ftw reo rsne o s rvic sa p vid sthe o a ffe tw rk e e nd ro e a p a n la r w ind p nd nc fro lo e ve p lic tio ye ith e e e e m w r-le l d ta e ils  Ma a p a n b a stheNOS to inte c d c ny p lic tio yp s ra t ire tly w thes s io o tra p rt la r fo g a r c ntro ith e s n r ns o ye r re te o l o r ne o re o e ve tw rk s urc s
  • 31.  It s rve a theus r inte c thro h w h ne o e s s e rfa e ug hic tw rk re o e c n b a c s e s urc s a e c e s d  In TC /IP theAp lic tio La r c nta a p to o P , p a n ye o ins ll ro c ls a m tho stha fa into there lmo p c s -to nd e d t ll a f ro e s - p c s c m unic tio viaa Inte t P to o (IP ro e s o m a ns n rne ro c l ) ne o us theTra p rt La r p to o to e ta lis tw rk ing ns o ye ro c ls s b h und rlyingho t-to s c nne tio e s -ho t o c ns
  • 32. 1. Re o es ring s urc ha 2 Re o filea c s . m te c es 3 Re o p . m te rinte a c s r c es 4 Inte ro e sc m unic tio p rt . r-p c s o m a n o 5 Re o p c d c ll s p rt . m te ro e ure a up o 6 Ne o m na e e . tw rk a g m nt 7. Dire to s rvic s c ry e e 8 Ele tro m s a inginc inge a m s a ing . c nic e s g lud -m il e s g
  • 33.  Te t lne  Hyp rte Tra fe P to o (HTTP e xt ns r ro c l )  FileTra fe P to o (FTP ns r ro c l )  Sim leMa Tra fe P to o (SMTP p il ns r ro c l )
  • 34.  9 , P n 9fro Be La sd trib d files te P la m ll b is ute ys m p to o ro c l AFP Ap leFilingP to o , p ro c l AP C Ad nc d P g m -P g mC m unic tio P , va e ro ra -to ro ra o m a n AMQP Ad nc d Me s g Que , va e sa e uingP to o ro c l BitTo nt rre Ato P lis m ub hingP to o ro c l BOOTP Bo ts pP to o , o tra ro c l CFDP C he nt FileDis utio P to o , o re trib n ro c l DDS, Da Dis utio Se e ta trib n rvic DHC , Dyna icHo t C nfig tio P to o P m s o ura n ro c l
  • 35. De e t vic Ne DNS, Do a Na eSys m(Se e P to o m in m te rvic ) ro c l e nke Do y ENRP End o Ha le p c Re und nc P to o , p int nd s a e d a y ro c l Fa tTra k (Ka a Gro te iMe h) s c Za , ks r, s Fing r, Us r Info a n P to o e e rm tio ro c l Fre ne e t FTAM, FileTra fe Ac e sa Ma g m nt ns r c s nd na e e FTP FileTra fe P to o , ns r ro c l Go he Go he p to o p r, p r ro c l HL7, He lth Le l Se n a ve ve
  • 36. HTTP Hyp rte Tra fe P to o , e xt ns r ro c l H.3 3 P c t-Ba e Multim d C m unic tio 2 , a ke s d e ia o m a ns Sys m te IMAP IMAP , Inte t Me s g Ac e sP to o , 4 rne s a e c s ro c l (ve io 4 rs n ) IRC , Inte t Re y C t P to o P rne la ha ro c l Ka e lia dm LDAP Lig e ht Dire to Ac e sP to o , htw ig c ry c s ro c l LP LineP D, rinte Da m n P to o r e o ro c l MIME (S-MIME), Multip o eInte t Ma urp s rne il Exte io a Se ureMIME ns ns nd c
  • 37. Mo b d us Ne o tc nf NFS, Ne o FileSys m tw rk te NIS, Ne o Info a n Se e tw rk rm tio rvic NNTP Ne o Ne sTra fe P to o , tw rk w ns r ro c l NTC , Na na Tra p rta n C m unic tio fo IP tio l ns o tio o m a ns r Inte e Tra p rta n Sys mP to o llig nt ns o tio te ro c l NTP Ne o Tim P to o , tw rk e ro c l OSC AR, AOL Ins nt Me s ng r P to o ta s e e ro c l P NRP P e Na eRe o , er m s lutio P to o n ro c l
  • 38. P , P 3 P s Offic P to o (ve io 3 OP OP , o t e ro c l rs n ) Rlo in, Re o Lo in in UNIX Sys m g m te g te s RTP Re l Tim P lis Sub c e S, a e ub h s rib RTSP Re l Tim Stre m P to o , a e a ing ro c l SAP Se s n Anno e e P to o , s io unc m nt ro c l SDP Se s n De c tio P to o , s io s rip n ro c l SIP Se s n Initia n P to o , s io tio ro c l SLP Se eLo a n P to o , rvic c tio ro c l SMB, Se r Me s g Blo k rve sa e c SMTP Sim leMa Tra fe P to o , p il ns r ro c l SNMP Sim leNe o Ma g m nt P to o , p tw rk na e e ro c l
  • 39. SNTP Sim leNe o Tim P to o , p tw rk e ro c l SSH, Se ureShe c ll SSMS, Se ureSMS Me s g P to o c s a ing ro c l RDP Re o De kto P to o , m te s p ro c l TC , Tra a tio C p b AP ns c n a a ilitie Ap lic tio P rt s p a n a TDS, Ta ula Da Stre m b r ta a TELNET, Te ina Em tio P to o o TC /IP rm l ula n ro c l f P TFTP Trivia FileTra fe P to o , l ns r ro c l TSP Tim Sta pP to o , e m ro c l VTP Virtua Te ina P to o , l rm l ro c l
  • 40. W ka a HTTP re la e e p to o a , n p c m nt ro c l W is(a RW is Re o Dire to Ac e sP to o ho nd ho ), m te c ry c s ro c l W b e DAV X.4 0 Me s g Ha lingSe eP to o 0 , s a e nd rvic ro c l X.5 0 Dire to Ac e sP to o (DAP 0, c ry c s ro c l ) XMP , Exte ib Me s g a P s nc P to o P ns le s a ing nd re e e ro c l
  • 41. Example of neither OSI Reference Model nor OSI protocols specify any programming interfaces