Marcos cloud-in-the-castle-v040811

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  • The NIST Definition of Cloud ComputingAuthors: Peter Mell and Tim GranceVersion 15, 10-7-09 National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory Note 1: Cloud computing is still an evolving paradigm. Its definitions, use cases, underlying technologies, issues, risks, and benefits will be refined in a spirited debate by the public and private sectors. These definitions, attributes, and characteristics will evolve and change over time. Note 2: The cloud computing industry represents a large ecosystem of many models, vendors, and market niches. This definition attempts to encompass all of the various cloud approaches.Definition of Cloud Computing: Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models. Essential Characteristics:On-demand self-service. A consumer can unilaterally provision computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interaction with each service’s provider. Broad network access. Capabilities are available over the network and accessed through standard mechanisms that promote use by heterogeneous thin or thick client platforms (e.g., mobile phones, laptops, and PDAs).Resource pooling. The provider’s computing resources are pooled to serve multiple consumers using a multi-tenant model, with different physical and virtual resources dynamically assigned and reassigned according to consumer demand. There is a sense of location independence in that the customer generally has no control or knowledge over the exact location of the provided resources but may be able to specify location at a higher level of abstraction (e.g., country, state, or datacenter). Examples of resources include storage, processing, memory, network bandwidth, and virtual machines.Rapid elasticity. Capabilities can be rapidly and elastically provisioned, in some cases automatically, to quickly scale out and rapidly released to quickly scale in. To the consumer, the capabilities available for provisioning often appear to be unlimited and can be purchased in any quantity at any time.Measured Service. Cloud systems automatically control and optimize resource use by leveraging a metering capability at some level of abstraction appropriate to the type of service (e.g., storage, processing, bandwidth, and active user accounts). Resource usage can be monitored, controlled, and reported providing transparency for both the provider and consumer of the utilized service. Service Models:Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to use the provider’s applications running on a cloud infrastructure. The applications are accessible from various client devices through a thin client interface such as a web browser (e.g., web-based email). The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, storage, or even individual application capabilities, with the possible exception of limited user-specific application configuration settings.Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to deploy onto the cloud infrastructure consumer-created or acquired applications created using programming languages and tools supported by the provider. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, or storage, but has control over the deployed applications and possibly application hosting environment configurations.Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to provision processing, storage, networks, and other fundamental computing resources where the consumer is able to deploy and run arbitrary software, which can include operating systems and applications. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure but has control over operating systems, storage, deployed applications, and possibly limited control of select networking components (e.g., host firewalls). Deployment Models:Private cloud. The cloud infrastructure is operated solely for an organization. It may be managed by the organization or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Community cloud. The cloud infrastructure is shared by several organizations and supports a specific community that has shared concerns (e.g., mission, security requirements, policy, and compliance considerations). It may be managed by the organizations or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Public cloud. The cloud infrastructure is made available to the general public or a large industry group and is owned by an organization selling cloud services.Hybrid cloud. The cloud infrastructure is a composition of two or more clouds (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability (e.g., cloud bursting for load-balancing between clouds). Note: Cloud software takes full advantage of the cloud paradigm by being service oriented with a focus on statelessness, low coupling, modularity, and semantic interoperability.
  • Marcos cloud-in-the-castle-v040811

    1. 1.   ITIL Castles In The Cloud <br />There is a castle on a cloud, 
I like to go there in my sleep, 
Aren’t any floors for me to sweep, 
Not in my castle on a cloud.<br />[Young Cosette - Les Miserables]
<br />Pink Elephant<br />
    2. 2. THE WINDS OF CHANGE<br />New Challenges for IT<br />New Requirements<br />Financial Transparency<br />Value vs. Cost<br />New Choices<br />SAAS<br />The rise of the MSP<br />Global Sourcing<br />Open Source<br />Low Cost Hosting<br />Disruptive Technology<br />Social Media<br />Green Computing<br />Cloud Computing<br />Mobility<br />
    3. 3. IT Under Pressure To Change<br />Need to Cut G&A Overhead<br />Board/<br />Executives<br />IT Squeeze<br />Massive<br />Technology<br />Changes<br />User Community<br />Internal Customer Dissatisfaction, Consumerization<br />
    4. 4. Consumerization and Cloud ComputingHit the Enterprise<br />Microsoft and Amazon<br />Want to Run Your Data Center!<br />
    5. 5. Indicators lead to cloud as future<br />“2010 CIO Agenda” - Gartner<br />
    6. 6. IT Strategy & Cloud Services <br />Business Product<br />Explore<br />Develop <br />Business Service<br />Produce<br />Ship<br />Refine<br />Blend <br />Business Process<br />Store<br />Pipe <br />Business Process<br />Business Process<br />Distribute<br />Market<br />Service Catalog<br />
    7. 7. IT Service Concepts<br />“People do not want quarter-inch drills. They want quarter-inch holes.”<br />Professor Emeritus Theodore Levitt, Harvard Business School<br />
    8. 8. What Is A Service?<br />“A service is a means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks.”<br />Fulfills one or more needs of the business<br /> Supports the customer’s business objectives<br /> Perceived by the customer as a coherent whole<br />
    9. 9. Systems vs Services<br />“An IT System is a number of related components that work together to facilitate the delivery of a service.”<br />IT Service<br />IT System<br />
    10. 10. Sourcing Services<br /><ul><li>Janitorial Services
    11. 11. Linen Services
    12. 12. Plant Maintenance
    13. 13. Refining Services
    14. 14. Fleet Management
    15. 15. Finance & Accounting
    16. 16. CRM Services
    17. 17. Call Center
    18. 18. Purchasing
    19. 19. Payroll Services
    20. 20. Data Center Services
    21. 21. Software As A Service
    22. 22. Telephony
    23. 23. Messaging
    24. 24. Desktop Automation
    25. 25. End User Services
    26. 26. Hosting / Storage</li></ul>eSourcing<br /><ul><li>Laptops
    27. 27. Shrink wrapped Software
    28. 28. Network Equipment
    29. 29. Servers
    30. 30. Memory</li></ul>Based On Source: eSCM-CL Part 1<br />
    31. 31. Business Units<br />Shared IT Services<br />3 Service Supplier Types <br />Business<br /> Unit A<br />Service<br /> Unit 1<br />Service W<br />Dedicated<br />Service<br />Business<br /> Unit B<br />Service<br /> Unit 2<br />Service X<br />External <br />Supplier<br />Shared<br />Service<br />Business<br /> Unit C<br />Service<br /> Unit 3<br />External<br />Business<br /> Unit A<br />Service Y<br />Outsourced<br />Service<br />Business<br /> Unit D<br />Service<br /> Unit 4<br />Service Z<br />Embedded IT<br />Service Value Network<br />Service Ecosystem<br />Service Catalog<br />
    32. 32. Cloud As A Service<br />“<br />“<br />A model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models.<br />Characteristics<br />Service model<br />On-demand self-service<br />Broad network access<br />Resource pooling<br />Rapid elasticity<br />Measured service<br />Cloud SaaS<br />Cloud PaaS<br />Cloud IaaS<br />The NIST Definition of Cloud Computing, Version 15, 10-7-09<br />Authors: Peter Mell and Tim Grance<br />
    33. 33. Cloud Concerns - Perceptions<br />
    34. 34. Cloud Computing & Management<br />Ref: Chris Hoff http://www.rationalsurvivability.com/blog/?p=743<br />
    35. 35. Call A Spade A Spade<br />Launching A Cloud Computing Strategy Means Outsourcing Multiple Slivers of Your IT Service Value Chain<br />What the IT Community is quickly coming to realize is that to deploy a cloud strategy within their organization successfully a number of processes and IT Service Management elements have to be defined - and better yet - automated from request through verified provisioning and then keep running as long as needed.<br />At the end of the day you get nothing for nothing 
Sitting flat on your butt doesn’t buy any bread<br />[At The End Of The Day - Les Miserables]<br />
    36. 36. Goal Of Supplier Management<br />The goal: of the Supplier Management process is to manage suppliers and services they supply, to provide seamless quality of IT service to the business, ensuring value for money is obtained.<br />It is essential that Supplier Management processes and planning are involved in all stages of the Service Lifecycle from strategy and design, through transition and operations, to improvement.<br />
    37. 37. Traditionalsupply model<br />Warning: Direct Business Relationship Bi-passing IT Supplier Mgmt. is a risk<br />External<br />Suppliers<br />External<br />Suppliers<br />Customer Organization<br />External IT<br />Suppliers<br />Hardware<br />Software<br />Environment<br />Internal<br />Business<br />Customers<br />IT Function<br />Products<br />IT Services<br />(Service Catalog)<br />Services<br />WAN Services<br />Telephony<br />Data Center Services<br />SaaS / Cloud Services<br />Business Process <br />Outsourcing<br />IT Supplier Mgmt. <br />SLAs<br />Contracts<br />Occasional Contact<br />
    38. 38. Supplier Categorization <br />High<br />Strategic<br />Suppliers<br />Tactical<br />Suppliers<br />Strategic:<br />For significant ‘partnering’ relationships that involve senior managers sharing confidential strategic information to facilitate long-term plans. <br />Tactical: <br />For relationships involving significant commercial activity and business interaction<br />Operational:<br />For suppliers of operational products or services<br />Commodity: <br />For suppliers that provide low-value and/or readily available products and services that could be alternatively sourced relatively easily <br />Operational<br />Suppliers<br />Tactical<br />Suppliers<br />Tactical<br />Suppliers<br />Medium<br />Value and importance<br />Operational<br />Suppliers<br />Commodity<br />Suppliers<br />Low<br />Low<br />Medium<br />High<br />© Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 4.31 Service Design, page 156<br />Risk and impact<br />
    39. 39. Service Lifecycle & Supplier Involvement<br />
    40. 40. IntegratedProcess Example<br />Supplier Management<br />Service Level Management<br />Change Management<br />Request Fulfillment<br />DML<br />Release & Deployment Mgmt.<br />Incident Management<br />Financial Mgmt.<br />Problem Management<br />Service Catalog<br />Service Desk<br />Service Asset & Config. Mgmt.<br />Event Management<br />IT Service Continuity Mgmt.<br />Access Management<br />Availability & Capacity Mgmt.<br />Information Security Mgmt.<br />Automated Provisioning Requires Process Automation<br />
    41. 41. Org 3<br />Org 2<br />Org 1<br />External<br />Scaled & Distributed Process Ownership<br />Process Owner: Has overall organizational process accountability and may as well have specific accountability for their own group or region.<br />Sponsor<br />ITSM Executive<br />Process Manager: Has process accountability for their specific functional group or region and is accountable to the Process Owner for organizational compliance<br />ITSM Governance<br />Process<br />Manager<br />Process<br />Manager<br />Process<br />Manager<br />Process Owner<br />Coordinator<br />
    42. 42. Procurement & Contracting<br />
    43. 43. PinkElephant - Expertos en Gestión de Servicios de TI<br />info.mx@pinkelephant.com<br />www.pinkelephant.com<br />

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