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TORNADOES PART 5: LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES
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TORNADOES PART 5: LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES

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We continue to operate with a flawed premise: Tornado disasters, which are seasonal events that occur annually in the united states are well understood; therefore tornado disaster resilience should be …

We continue to operate with a flawed premise: Tornado disasters, which are seasonal events that occur annually in the united states are well understood; therefore tornado disaster resilience should be accomplished relatively easily. Unfortunately, the fact of the matter is, tornado disasters are complex, making tornado disaster resilience a very elusive goal to achieve. What have we learned from the past? First of all, the timing of anticipatory actions is vital. Secondly, buildings with roof systems and facads engineered to withstand a tornado’s high velocity winds will protect occupants and users from death and injury. The people who know: 1) what to expect (e.g., high-velocity winds, rain, hail), 2) where and when the toudh down will happen, 3) what they should (and should not) do to prepare 4) The people who know that they may have little or no warning and still can get out of harm’s way will survive. Finally,the local community's capacity for emergency health care offsets the crisis caused by damaged hospitals and medical facilities, lack of clean drinking water, food, and medicine, and high levels of morbidity and mortality. Presentation courtesy of Dr. Walter Hays, Global Alliance For Disaster Reduction

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  • 1. LEARNING FROM GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES PART 5: TORNADOES
  • 2. TORNADOES Caused by the collision of descending cold and ascending warm air masses
  • 3. “THE TORNADO SEASON” • The “tornado season” is late winter through midsummer,…. • But tornadoes can happen any time of the year and in any state when the atmospheric conditions are right. • Unusual numbers of tornadoes are a consequence of La Nina, the cooling of the Pacific Ocean, which can cause global changes in weather patterns.
  • 4. A SUPER STORM CELL CAN SPAWN MANY TORNADOES
  • 5. WINDS CAN REACH 500 KPH (300 MPH) AT “TOUCH DOWN”
  • 6. NATIONS THAT NEED TO BECOME TORNADO DISASTER RESILIENT • USA (especially in the states identified as “Tornado Alley”) • AUSTRALIA (rare, but occasionally)
  • 7. TORNADO ALLEY
  • 8. TORNADO RISK MAP
  • 9. WIND AND WATER PENETRATE BUILDING ENVELOPE TORNADOES UPLIFT OF ROOF SYSTEM FLYING DEBRIS (all sizes and shapes) REGIONAL STORM CELLS HEAVY PRECIPITATION AND HAIL STONES NO WARNING (MUDFLOWS) NO SAFE “SAFE HAVENS” CAUSES OF RISK GLOBAL DISASTER LABORATORIES
  • 10. TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Little or no warning; no time for effective evacuation • Downed trees • Power outages • Damaged cars and trucks • Roofs ripped off; buildings destroyed
  • 11. TYPICAL SOCIOECONOMIC IMPACTS • Houses, businesses, warehouses, shopping malls, schools, and hospitals damaged and/or destroyed • Major roads blocked by debris • Airports and train stations closed
  • 12. WE CONTINUE TO OPERATE WITH A FLAWED PREMISE: TORNADO DISASTERS, WHICH ARE SEASONAL EVENTS THAT OCCUR ANNUALLY IN THE UNITED STATES ARE WELL UNDERSTOOD; THEREFORE TORNADO DISASTER RESILIENCE IS SHOULD BE RELATIVELY EASY.
  • 13. FACT: TORNADO DISASTERS ARE COMPLEX, MAKING TORNADO DISASTER RESILIENCE A VERY ELUSIVE GOAL TO ACHIEVE
  • 14. EXAMPLES OF PAST TORNADO DISASTERS
  • 15. THIRTY TO FORTY TORNADOES STRIKES FIVE SOUTHERN STATES Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee 54 dead FEBRUARY 5, 2008
  • 16. MAP
  • 17. A TORNADO TOUCHES DOWN NEAR ATKINS, ARKANSAS
  • 18. DEVASTATION NEAR ATKINS, ARKANSAS
  • 19. DEVASTATION NEAR ATKINS, ARKANSAS
  • 20. COLLAPSE OF WAREHOUSE IN SOUTH HAVEN, MISS.
  • 21. COLLAPSE OF SHOPPING MALL: MEMPHIS, TN
  • 22. FIRE IN A NATURAL GAS PUMPING STATION: HARTSVILLE, TN
  • 23. SUPER STORM CELL SPAWNS TORNADOES; TX: APRIL 2008
  • 24. IMPACTS •WIND AND HAIL DAMAGE NEAR FT WORTH, TX ESTIMATED AT $35 MILLION • POWER OUTAGES
  • 25. TORNADOES STRIKE IOWA AND MINNESOTA Continuation of the deadliest tornado season in a decade May 25, 2008
  • 26. HUGO, MINNESOTA: DEBRIS MARKS STORM'S PATH
  • 27. PARKERSBURG, IOWA: DAMAGE
  • 28. PARKERSBURG, IOWA: SEARCH AND RESCUE
  • 29. STORMS IN THE MID-WESTERN USA Occur Late Winter through Spring, Every Year
  • 30.  Although far from the so-called "Tornado Alley," a region that falls generally in the southern plains of Texas, Okla. and Kan., the greater Midwest also experiences a large number of tornadoes each year.
  • 31.  A major difference is that Midwestern tornadoes are more likely to form late at night and in colder months than those in “Tornado Alley.”
  • 32. . For example, Indiana experiences only about 20 tornadoes a year, compared to about 52 in Oklahoma. and 124 in Texas.
  • 33. LESSON: THE TIMING OF ANTICIPATORY ACTIONS IS VITAL • The people who know: 1) what to expect (e.g., high-velocity winds, rain, hail), 2) where and when the toudh down will happen, and 3) what they should (and should not) do to prepare will survive.
  • 34. LESSON: TIMELY EARLY WARNING AND EVACUATION SAVES LIVES • The people who know that they may have little or no warning and still can get out of harm’s way will survive.
  • 35. LESSON: WIND ENGINEERED BUILDINGS SAVE LIVES • Buildings with roof systems and facads engineered to withstand a tornado’s high velocity winds will protect occupants and users from death and injury.
  • 36. WHEN IMPLEMENTED, THE TORNADO “SAFE ROOM” IS A RECENT INNOVATION THAT IS MORE EFFECTIVE THAN THE WELL KNOWN CELLAR IN SAVING LIVES
  • 37. LESSON: EMERGENCY RESPONSE SAVES LIVES AND PROTECTS • The timing of emergency response operations is vitally important for search and rescue and provision of emergency services to save lives and protect property.
  • 38. LESSON: EMERGENCY MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS SAVES LIVES • The local community’s capacity for emergency health care offsets the crisis caused by damaged hospitals and medical facilities, lack of clean drinking water, food, and medicine, and high levels of morbidity and mortality.

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