Sales Management  Skills
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Sales Management Skills

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Sales Management  Skills Sales Management Skills Presentation Transcript

  • The PowerPoint slides were developed by Mus Khairy (PhD), Stanford University at California. Educational ,Social Psychologists at German University at Cairo (GUC) unless otherwise noted on specific slides.
  • C HAPTER 11 C ONTENTS OF THE S ALES T RAINING P ROGRAM: S ALES K NOWLEDGE AND THE S ELLING P ROCESS
    • The connection between training and learning.
    • The importance of sales knowledge and how such knowledge is developed.
    • The use of computer technology to make the salesperson’s job easier and to provide better customer service.
    • That persuasive communication is a fundamental aspect of sales skills development.
    • The selling process as a vital tool for the salesperson and the importance of each step.
    • That quality customer service is a necessity.
    • The research that reinforces the sales success strategies discussed in this chapter.
    L EARNING O BJECTIVES The training of a salesperson makes all the difference between a successful sales career and an unsuccessful one. This chapter should help you understand:
  • S HOULD I T B E C ALLED T RAINING OR E DUCATION? Learning is a relatively permanent change in behavior occurring as a result of experience. Training is included in one’s experiences. Thus, training is part of an individual’s total learning experience.
  • FIGURE 11.1 THE LEARNING PROCESS INVOLVED IN TRAINING THE INDIVIDUAL SALESPERSON
      • Being receptive to new information.
      • Looking forward to future training.
      • Possibly seeking new training.
    O N-THE- J OB B EHAVIOR The positive attitude and the OTJ experience result in the trainee: R ELATIONSHIP OF T RAINING TO L EARNING
  • Operational and behavioral information: Operational learning involves sales knowledge development such as new procedures, new product information, how to call in orders, new territorial forms to complete, new technology, and changes in the financial incentive program. Behavioral training involves the sales skills development area.
  • S ALES K NOWLEDGE D EVELOPMENT
      • Company knowledge.
      • The sales role.
      • Product knowledge.
      • Prices.
      • Advertising and sales promotion.
      • Channels of distribution.
      • Customers.
      • Competition, industry, and economy.
      • Territorial management skills.
  • P RODUCT K NOWLEDGE Product knowledge may include these technical details:
      • Performance data.
      • Physical size and characteristics.
      • How the product operates.
      • Specific product features, advantages, and benefits.
      • How well the product is selling in the marketplace.
  • C HANNELS OF D ISTRIBUTION Some important information salespeople need includes:
      • The likes and dislikes of each channel member’s customers.
      • The product lines and assortment each one carries.
      • When each member sees salespeople.
      • Each member’s distribution, promotional, and pricing policies.
      • What and how much of a product each has purchased in the past.
  • K NOWLEDGE OF T ECHNOLOGY
      • More effective management of sales leads and better follow-through on customer contacts.
      • Improves customer relations due to more effective follow-ups.
      • Improves organization of selling time.
      • Provides more efficient account control and better time and territorial management.
    Several reasons to train salespeople to use a PC are:
      • Increases number and quality of sales calls.
      • Improves speed and accuracy in finishing and sending reports and orders to the company.
      • Helps develop more effective proposals and persuasive presentations.
    Several reasons to train salespeople to use a PC are: continued
  • Computers are at the heart of salespeople’s ability to provide top-quality customer service by receiving and sending out information efficiently. Technology not only helps salespeople increase their productivity but also allows them to gather and access information more efficiently. S ALES AND C USTOMER S ERVICE E NHANCEMENT
  • Contact Management – A listing of all the customers contacts a salesperson makes in the course of conducting business. P ERSONAL P RODUCTIVITY Calendar Management – The management of time. Automated Sales Plans, Tactics, and Ticklers – Sales strategies often involve a sequence of events that can be identified and plotted.
  • Geographic Information Systems – Allows salespeople to view and manipulate customer and prospect information on an electronic map. P ERSONAL P RODUCTIVITY continued Computer-Based Presentations – The computer can be a powerful presentation tool.
  • C OMMUNICATIONS WITH C USTOMERS AND E MPLOYER Today's most popular sales force automation systems involve:
      • Word processing.
      • Electronic mail.
      • Fax capabilities and support.
  • C USTOMER O RDER P ROCESSING AND S ERVICE S UPPORT The process of obtaining, generating, and completing an order is much more complicated than it may seem.
  • Salespeople’s Mobile Offices Salespeople have begun installing small offices directly into vehicles such as minivans.
  • E - C OMMERCE AND THE S ALES F ORCE
      • An Internet site can be a help to salespeople in servicing and selling customers.
      • Builds customer loyalty.
      • Saves customers money.
      • Speeds the sales process.
      • Improves relationships.
      • Lowers sales costs.
  • G LOBAL T ECHNOLOGY The ability to access information anywhere is a valuable asset.
  • S ALES S KILLS D EVELOPMENT Involves two key elements:
      • Persuasive communications.
      • The selling process.
      • Talking about product benefits to the prospect rather than the product’s features and advantages.
      • Nonverbal body language – learning to recognize a buyer’s nonverbal signs and how to send out positive nonverbal body signals.
      • Questioning or probing skills and courses in listening.
      • Using visual aids, drama, and demonstrations in the sales presentation.
    Several main persuasive communication skills are:
  • T HE S ELLING P ROCESS Most sales trainers believe logical, sequential steps do exist that, if followed, can greatly improve the chance of making a sale.
  • FIGURE 11.2 THE SALES PROCESS
  • Salespeople can ask themselves three questions to determine if an individual or organization is a qualified prospect:
      • Does the prospect have the money to buy?
      • Does the prospect have the authority to buy?
      • Does the prospect have the desire to buy?
  • TABLE 11.2 POPULAR PROSPECTING METHODS
    • Cold canvassing
    • Public exhibitions and demonstrations
    • Endless chain – customer referral
    • Center of influence
    • Orphaned customers
    • Direct mail
    • Sales lead clubs
    • Telephone and telemarketing
    • Prospect lists
    • Observation
    • Get published
    • Networking
  • Referrals are Popular
      • Leads
      • Referrals
      • Orphans
      • Customers
    The prospect pool is a group of names gathered from various sources. The prospect pool is usually created from four main sources:
  • FIGURE 11.3 THE PROSPECT POOL
  • P REAPPROACH IS P RECALL P LANNING During the preapproach, the salesperson investigates the prospect in greater depth and plans the sales call.
  • Reasons for planning the sales call:
      • Helps build a salesperson’s self-confidence.
      • Develops an atmosphere of goodwill and trust with the buyer.
      • Helps create an image of professionalism.
      • Increases sales because people are prepared.
  • FIGURE 11.4 STEPS IN PLANNING THE SALES CALL
  • Developing a Customer Benefit Plan Step One: Select the features, advantages, and benefits of the product to present. Step Two: Develop the marketing plan. Step Three: Develop a business proposition. Step Four: Develop a suggested purchase order.
  • The sales opener, or approach, is the first major part of the sales presentation. The first impression is critical to success. T HE A PPROACH – O PENING THE S ALES P RESENTATION
      • Introductory approach.
      • Product approach.
      • Customer benefit approach.
      • Curiosity approach.
    Approach Techniques are Numerous
  • FIGURE 11.5 THE SALESPERSON’S PRESENTATION MIX IS TYPICALLY DEVELOPED BY SALES MANAGERS AND TRAINERS Persuasive Communication Dramatization Demonstration Visual Aids Proof Participation Salesperson The Sales Presentation Mix
  • This method assumes that the prospect’s needs can be stimulated by exposure to the product or already have been stimulated because the prospect has sought out the product. Stimulus-Response Method
    • Some of the method’s shortcomings are:
      • Talks about product features not important to buyer.
      • Uses same “pitch” for different people.
      • Assumes salesperson is in total control.
      • Has little prospect participation, making it difficult to uncover needs.
  • The salesperson may use a structured series of steps such as the AIDA approach. Formula Method
        • A ttention
        • I nterest
        • D esire
        • A ction
  • Need-Satisfaction Method The need-satisfaction method is different from the stimulus-response and the formula approach in that it is designed as an interactive sales presentation.
  • T HE T RIAL C LOSE
    • Salespeople may at any time use a trial close like one of these:
      • How does that sound to you?
      • What color do you prefer?
      • If you bought this, where would you use it in your business?
      • Are these features what you are looking for?
    The trial close involves checking the prospect’s attitude toward the sales presentation.
  • O BJECTIONS A RE S ALESPEOPLE’S F RIENDS An objection is opposition or resistance to information or a request.
  • Types of Objections Real objections are tangible. Prospects will sometimes give an excuse to keep objections hidden. Prospects will usually not purchase until these hidden objections are answered.
  • Techniques for Meeting Questions :
      • Postponing objections
      • Boomerang
      • Asking questions
  • T HE C LOSE Closing is the process of helping people make a beneficial decision.
  • Closing Techniques
      • The compliment
      • The summary
      • Minor decision
      • Assumptive
  • R ESEARCH R EINFORCES C HAPTER’S S ALES S UCCESS S TRATEGIES
      • Ask questions to gather information and uncover needs.
      • Recognize when a customer has a real need and how the benefits of the product or service can satisfy it.
      • Establish a balanced dialogue with customers.
  • R ESEARCH R EINFORCES C HAPTER’S S ALES S UCCESS S TRATEGIES
      • Recognize and handle negative customer attitudes promptly and directly.
      • Use a benefit summary and an action plan requiring commitment when closing.
    continued
  • A DAPTING TO G LOBAL M ARKETS
      • Be prepared and do your homework.
      • Slow down.
      • Develop relationships and trust before getting down to business.
      • Learn the language and its nuances, or get a good interpreter.
      • Respect the culture.
    Five rules for successful selling abroad:
  • T HE B OTTOM L INE Sales training is now defined as part of a salesperson’s overall educational experience. Training can be divided into two categories: operational and behavioral. Companies are using and teaching technology more frequently than ever. Sales skills development includes two key elements: persuasive communications and the selling process. The selling process is usually seen as a series of steps. The close is the last step in the actual selling process.