Understanding the Business Value of Content Strategy (TUG Open House)
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Understanding the Business Value of Content Strategy (TUG Open House)

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Slides from the Ann Arbor (Oct. 2013) and Grand Rapids (Nov. 2013) Understanding Group Open Houses. The importance of realizing how content strategy helps to enable an organization's core values. Hat ...

Slides from the Ann Arbor (Oct. 2013) and Grand Rapids (Nov. 2013) Understanding Group Open Houses. The importance of realizing how content strategy helps to enable an organization's core values. Hat tip to Jonathan Coleman for the inspiration for this talk.

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  • Good Evening! Thank you for coming to TUG… spending time with me and listening to me give my spiel. .
  • We really want to talk about driving business value today… and we can’t really do that without addressing Values, People, Content Strategy and Being Clear.
  • If I were to ask you to look at your organization/your clients or even your personal digital footprint and identify places that your “core values” are present, it may be difficult, like locating the source of the light in this picture. This could be for one or some of many reasons. Often times our digital experiences mirror our corporate structure and don’t bring the values of the organizaiton and its people to the experience. Other times we simply aren’t congruent with our values in communications that are public facing. Perhaps even more consistent is that our organizational values are VERY difficult to portray or we haven’t spent enough time establishing them in the first place.
  • Core values are the manifestation of culture. They should define your culture and personify your company. They should not change when you expand, or go through tough times. They are your own secret sauce for success.Core values are sometimes known as tenants, maxims, guiding principles or brand promises. No matter which word an organization adopts the outputs should be the habits everyone within a company must possess to consistently succeed as a business. They’re like the seeds of this this apple. All of the other elements that make an apple, an apple, grew from the seeds. if we peeled away all of the other things we’d still have the ingredients to make another apple. Core values ore the seeds to the story that makes a great company unique. They help fulfill its relevant differentiating benefit to the marketplace in which it operates and the world around them. They’re also necessary for helping to architect the places an organization makes online.
  • Does anyone recognize who these values belong to?
  • CONFLICT. Not only are the values that Enron chose REALLY, REALLY nebulous, they weren’t something that the company, or the people that were part of it, believe in. And because they weren’t something the company or its people “felt” It showed in multiple places and lead to major inconsistency. So how does this happen?
  • A company’s values/principles/etc. should be a reflection of the company itself…and should help guide everything the company does, from hiring to communicating to the structuring of its digital communications. We start to understand core values when we start to ask ourselves questions. What do we do? Who are we? (3) Who are we doing it for? (4) Why do we do it?
  • A company’s values/principles/etc. should be a reflection of the company itself…and should help guide everything the company does, from hiring to communicating to the structuring of its digital communications. We start to understand core values when we start to ask ourselves questions. What do we do? Who are we? (3) Who are we doing it for? (4) Why do we do it?
  • This is value number 8 in action.
  • These are the values of Patagonia.Truly Exceptional companies don’t just sell products, they sell their process, because their core values are present in EVERYTHING they do.
  • These are the values of Patagonia.Truly Exceptional companies don’t just sell products, they sell their process, because their core values are present in EVERYTHING they do.
  • Or as Dan Klyn would paraphrase it… “Thoughts become things.” Ghandi has another famous quote, “We must be the change we want to see in the world,” Being the change means taking up action, which req
  • They give you reason for the things you want to say, and start to frame how you say them. They’re a crucial part of the story and a key element to consider before publishing anything online… Ethnographer, Author of Start With Why and TED Speaker Simon Sinek Says people don’t buy what you do, they buy how why do it. That means the business story is only part of the equation.
  • People
  • When we architect an experience for a user, context is crucial in the content strategy phases of a project. For me, the most important elements of context can be addressed if we focus on: BehaviorsSituationsEnvironments
  • Physical Factors:Doing: Environmental factors, physical activity levels, habits, disabilities, preferences and sensori stimuliEmotional Factors: Feelings: - Psychological state the content or information puts them inUsers stress level, wants, desires, needsCognitive Factors:Learning: Cognitive assumptions, learning abilities, educational level
  • Situational context is in reference to the actual or perceived situations that users are facing when they need to access our content. How do we deliver content differently to someone who has to buy a new car because theirs has been destroyed in a crash, vs. someone who may be car shopping for a convertible they intend to use only on weekends?
  • When you blend situational and behavioral contexts together, you have the basis for a contextually relevant content strategy, or at the very least, a place to begin when forming questions for research.
  • But not just device type, it’s download speed, time, place, temperature and season.
  • In the middle of all of these are the Core Values of an organization
  • Planning helps to define:• Information• Ownership• Support
  • Planning helps to define:What we haveWhere the gaps are
  • Planning helps to define:• Who should produce thingsWhat they need to produce successful things
  • Helps to define:Guidelines for content managementSuccess Metrics and workflow
  • Content Strategy ASKS THE HARD QUESTIONS and facilitates the happy marriage of the business and user story… because the core values of a company aren’t what we WANT them to be. They’re simply what they are… we owe it to ourselves to use the process of content strategy to Add value for users, AND enable the business to be CONGRUENT WITH ITS VALUES… BEING CLEAR ON BOTH OF THESE THINGS HELPS FACILITATE UNDERSTANDING AND BUILD VALUE FOR A BRAND THAT’S MEASURABLE
  • Content Strategy ASKS THE HARD QUESTIONS and facilitates the happy marriage of the business and user story… because the core values of a company aren’t what we WANT them to be. They’re simply what they are… we owe it to ourselves to use the process of content strategy to Add value for users, AND enable the business to be CONGRUENT WITH ITS VALUES… BEING CLEAR ON BOTH OF THESE THINGS HELPS FACILITATE UNDERSTANDING AND BUILD VALUE FOR A BRAND THAT’S MEASURABLE
  • To express who you are… not who you think you are or who you should be. To support a more passionate work culture.
  • To express who you are… not who you think you are or who you should be. To support a more passionate work culture.
  • To express who you are… not who you think you are or who you should be. To support a more passionate work culture.

Understanding the Business Value of Content Strategy (TUG Open House) Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CONTENT STRATEGY: Creating Business Value Through Better Content Presented by
  • 2. HI! I’M DANIEL EIZANS PAST LIFE: I’ve been a journalist, a student of neuroscience, a marketer and strategist at two of the world’s largest advertising agencies. CLIENT WORK: Automotive (Ford/Chevrolet), Government (EPA, CDC, US Mint), Non-Profits (National Safety Council), Healthcare (Kaiser Permanente) and Consumer Products (Olympic Paint). TWITTER: @danieleizans
  • 3. TONIGHT I WANT TO TALK ABOUT … Values People Content Strategy Being Clear
  • 4. CORE VALUES
  • 5. WHAT DO WE MEAN BY CORE VALUES?
  • 6. A MAJOR COMPANY’S “CORE VALUES” COMMUNICATI ON RESPECT INTEGRITY EXCELLENCE
  • 7. CORE VALUES IN CONFLICT
  • 8. Principles aren’t principles until they cost you something. There are times when abiding by them can be awkward, uncomfortable, embarrassing, and expensive. - Paul Saginaw, Co-Founder Zingermans Carl Collins: http://www.flickr.com/photos/carlcollins/69912897/
  • 9. CORE VALUES ARE REFLECTIVE 1. Great food
2. Great service
3. A great place to shop and eat!
4. Solid profits
5. A great place to work
6. Strong relationships
7. A place to learn
8. An active part of our community
  • 10. AND THEY SHOW EVERYWHERE
  • 11. CORE VALUES ARE REFLECTIVE 1. Quality: Pursuit of ever-greater quality in everything we do. 2. Integrity: Relationships built on integrity and respect. 3. Environmentalism: Serve as a catalyst for personal and corporate action. 4. Not Bound by Convention: Our success and much of the fun lies in developing innovative ways to do things.
  • 12. PATAGONIA IN PRACTICE
  • 13. IT’S MORE THAN A MISSION STATEMENT Your beliefs become your thoughts. Your thoughts become your words, Your words become your actions, Your actions become your habits, Your habits become your values, Your values become your destiny. - Mahatma Gandhi
  • 14. CORE VALUES ARE CENTRAL TO THE BUSINESS STORY
  • 15. STARTING WITH STRATEGY Understanding If we want to facilitate Understanding we have to start with a strategic foundation. And while the core values, goals and objectives of a business are part of the story that sets that foundation, it’s only part of the story. Business Story User Story
  • 16. Let’s talk about people sites are geared LET’S TALKMost webattention by focusing PEOPLE for grabbing on findability factors that make it more useful for machines. http://www.flickr.com/photos/untitlism/22800371/
  • 17. ELEMENTS OF CONTEXT Behavior Situation Environment
  • 18. PERSONAL-BEHAVIORAL CONTEXT DOING environmental factors, physical activity, habits, disabilities, preferences, sensory stimuli Physical Emotional FEELING psychological state, stress level, desires, wants, needs Cognitive LEARNING cognitive assumptions, learning ability, education
  • 19. PERSONAL-SITUATIONAL CONTEXT Task Task Situation Task Need Need Task Task Need Task Task Task
  • 20. SITUATIONAL-BEHAVIORAL CONTEXT Task Physical Emotional Task Situation Cognitive Need Task Task Need Task Need Task Task Task CONTEXTUAL CONTENT STRATEGY
  • 21. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
  • 22. LET’S TALK CONTENT STRATEGY Content Strategy
  • 23. WHAT IS “CONTENT STRATEGY?” Content strategy plans for the creation, delivery, and governance of content useful for humans and machines. From creation to analysis, every content type takes on its own lifecycle. Stakeholder Goals, User Expectations, and Best Practices become important factors for content’s purpose and how it lives within the daily lives of employees, vendors, and others who are connected. 23
  • 24. ELEMENTS OF CONTENT STRATEGY Content Components Planning and Delivery (Goals and Substance) Structure People Components People, Processes, and Content Workflow and Rules A content strategy enables information architecture by ensuring there is a reason for the content you produce to occupy your site. Governance and Measurement The development of a content strategy helps define how people within an organization create and manage content and how the content itself is structured. 24
  • 25. PLANNING AND DELIVERY Planning and delivery focus on goals and substance. This element of the content strategy process aligns content needs with the digital strategy for target audiences. Helps To Define • • • • • Information Ownership Support Publishing Rhythms Messaging Priorities Deliverables • • • • Messaging Architecture Intended Audiences and Outcomes Voice and Tone Editorial Calendars and Schedules 25
  • 26. STRUCTURE Focuses on prioritization, organization, and modeling. It focuses on the content’s parts to make it findable, portable and flexible for multiple sites, applications, and uses. Helps To Define • • • • • Publishing strategy Writing methods and guides Data models Metadata schemas Semantic orchestration (CMS guidelines) Deliverables • • • • • Content maps Page tables Taxonomy Data models CMS changes 26
  • 27. WORKFLOW AND RULES Focuses on how people create, manage, edit, and maintain content on a daily basis. These guidelines include the roles, tasks, and tools required for producing content on behalf of an organization. Helps To Define • • • • Publishing processes Editorial workflow Creation standards Revision guidelines Deliverables • • • • • Publishing guidelines and manuals Org charts Metadata and taxonomy changes Human processes CMS workflow changes 27
  • 28. GOVERNANCE AND MEASUREMENT Focuses on policy, standards, and guidelines that apply to content and its lifecycle. Assists with the sustainment and evolution of content plans and strategy over time. Helps To Define • Major and medium changes to site architecture and content strategy • Expiration/archiving strategy • Metrics and measurement • Refinement guidelines Deliverables • • Governance council Policy documents 28
  • 29. Content Strategy 101 THE CONTENT STRATEGY PROCESS
  • 30. PLANNING Content strategy will help answer: Planning • • • Sourcing What messages should be communicated? What medium supports the message? What tone of voice should be used? Creation • • • Governance What content do we already have? What kinds of content need to be created? Who should we be creating for and why?
  • 31. SOURCING Content strategy will help answer: Planning • • • Sourcing What content currently exists on the site? What content is missing? What content can be repurposed, re-used, or edited? Creation • • Governance What content can we source from a partner or third party? How will we migrate existing content?
  • 32. CREATION Content strategy will help answer: Planning • • • Sourcing Who is going to write or produce content? What guidelines do we provide content creators? Who is responsible for reviewing, editing, and approving content? Creation • • Governance What legal or regulatory approvals are needed? What quality control measures do we need?
  • 33. GOVERNANCE Content strategy will help answer: Planning • • • Sourcing What happens once content goes live? How often do we need to update content? How do we handle change requests? Creation • • Governance How do we measure success of our content? Should ownership/maintenance be centralized or decentralized?
  • 34. MAKE THE COMPLEX CLEAR Being Clear
  • 35. ASK THE HARD QUESTIONS 1. Would you keep this value if you weren’t supported or rewarded for it? 2. Would you still care about this if it didn’t help your bottom line? 3. Would you still have this value if you had to start your company tomorrow? 4. Would you fire someone who didn’t uphold these values? 5. Do your customers know your values? 6. Are these values clear in your
  • 36. FOCUS ON STORIES
  • 37. ALIGN CONTENT STRATEGY WITH CORE VALUES
  • 38. BE MINDFUL OF VOICE
  • 39. LOVE WHAT YOU DO “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel." - Mya Angelou
  • 40. THANK YOU