Friday Session #64: Key Recipes For Killer Infographics
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Friday Session #64: Key Recipes For Killer Infographics

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A slidedeck presented at the 64th Cleverwood Friday Session. Feel free to visit our website for various other courses in digital media http://www.cleverwood.be/learning-hub ...

A slidedeck presented at the 64th Cleverwood Friday Session. Feel free to visit our website for various other courses in digital media http://www.cleverwood.be/learning-hub

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  • NEW FIRST SLIDE: TWITTER ICON 2
  • From Wikipedia
  • +interactive infographic
  • The brain processes visual information 60,000x faster than text.Imagine explaining a route description vs. looking at a map
  • What we candeducefrom the previous slides, is infographics serve twomainpurposes:
  • Content: lots & lots of impressivenumbersVisualize as: maps, diagrams, emphasizednumbersDoesn’tneedtobeüber-creative, easiestto produce
  • 2 (or more) characters or concepts that people care aboutFocus on both differences and similaritiesUse of humour & stylized design in placeGettingthe content right for the audience is crucial here. Both sides of the debate need to be characters or concepts that people care about. A common feature of the above infographics is a focus on both differences and similarities. A little humour and stylised design are a must if they are to succeed. 
  • These infographics can often be the most visually arresting but are some of the most tricky to produce. Quality photographs and well-thought out design are a must if a photo infographic is to look anything other than amateurish. 
  • When designing infographics like these it’s best to imagine them being printed out. As such, usability should be the priority with a straightforward design and content which is strictly relevant to the topic at hand. The ‘useful bait’ can do well on content sharing platforms like Pinterest and StumbleUpon.
  • Flow charts are guaranteed to hook in viewers if they answer a question the audience feels is important. Engaging the right audience will result in the infographic receiving plenty of attention on the relevant social media.Design-wise, simpler is better as clutter can be off-putting but to make the exercise worthwhile there needs to be plenty of options, otherwise viewers will feel forced into overly narrow categories, so some degree of balance is needed. A sense of humour is a definite bonus; hopefully no-one is basing a major life decision on an infographic so it’s okay to be a bit tongue-in-cheek.
  • http://agbeat.com/business-marketing/piktochart-simple-infographic-creator-online-for-the-busy-professional/
  • Translateconceptsintometaphors
  • Visualization of: ‘populationdensity’More attractivethanwritingnumberseverywhere
  • Harry Beck (electricaldraughtsman), London Underground, published in 1933Resembles anelectrical circuitdiagram (=http://briankerr.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/circuitdiagram.jpg)Visualization of: ‘connections’
  • http://neomam.com/interactive/13reasons
  • Unlessyou want togive the reader the impression of being in a roller coaster, this is a highlyinefficient flow.
  • Onlyuseorganicshapesifyouknowwhatyou are doing. Else you end up withverymessy, amateurish-lookinginfographics
  • Onlyuseorganicshapesifyouknowwhatyou are doing. Else you end up withverymessy, amateurish-lookinginfographics
  • - Workwith a limitedcolor palette =>
  • NEW FINAL SLIDE

Transcript

  • 1. Key recipes for killer infographics 25/03/2014 With Kevin Van Lierde FRIDAY SESSION #64 @Cleverwood #FridaySession
  • 2. What‟s in a name Noun: Infographic, (plural –s) etymology: info[rmation] + graphic 1. Visual representation of information
  • 3. They have been around for a while  •  •
  • 4. They have evolved
  • 5. Some examples You‟ve seen „em, more often than you might think
  • 6. In biological encyclopedia‟s
  • 7. Geographical encyclopedia‟s too…
  • 8. In resumes, why not..
  • 9. On planes sometimes…
  • 10. Traits & Benefits of infographics Why they are so popular WITH READERS
  • 11. The data overload situation: More & faster  Short attention spans  Data clutter  Time is precious
  • 12. Easier & faster to interpret Road closed to vehicles in both directions VS. 10 ms 2s
  • 13. Literally VS.
  • 14. The aim of infographics Slicing big overwhelming data into comprehensible chunks to make it more accesible and inviting, and provide entertainment along with information.
  • 15. Traits & Benefits of infographics Why they are popular WITH PUBLISHERS
  • 16. They are easy to share & embed
  • 17. They have mad ROI
  • 18. Types of infographics It depends on your data & goals
  • 19. The „Number crunch‟ Infographic  Impressive numbers  Maps, diagrams, emphasized numbers  Doesn‟t need to be über-creative, easiest to produce
  • 20. The „Number crunch‟ Infographic Alternative Paralympic statistics
  • 21. The „Number crunch‟ Infographic
  • 22. The Comparative (versus) Infographic  2 (or more) characters or concepts that people care about  Differences & similarities  Humor & stylized design
  • 23. The Comparative (versus) Infographic
  • 24. The Comparative (versus) Infographic
  • 25. The Photographic Infographic  Quality photo  Simple, good design  Most compelling if well-thought
  • 26. The Photographic Infographic
  • 27. The Photographic Infographic
  • 28. The Useful Bait  Useful, relevant content  Straightforward design, usability first  Print in mind  Cheat sheets, How to‟s, …
  • 29. The Useful Bait: „cheat sheet‟ Cooking methods Cheat sheet
  • 30. The Useful Bait: Real-life example
  • 31. The Flow Chart  Process display, choices  Humor  Simplicity is key
  • 32. The Flow Chart Which wine fits your needs best?
  • 33. The Flow Chart: Real life example Jbc T-shirt, Borlée Brothers Collection
  • 34. The Timeline  Chronological data, evolution  Needs an engaging story  Take the reader “on a trip”
  • 35. The Timeline Timeline of coffee history
  • 36. The Visualized Article  Most suitable for lots of text content  Often used offline (magazines, newspapers)  Engaging story, supportive visuals
  • 37. The Visualized Article From TIME Magazine
  • 38. The Visualized Article
  • 39. The Data Visualization  Content: connections, anything  Visualize as: maps, mindmaps, creative metaphors  Requires a creative and comprehensible approach
  • 40. The Data Visualization Population density in the US, Time Magazine
  • 41. The Data Visualization: Real life Example London Underground, 1933 by Harry Beck, electrical draughtsman
  • 42. The Interactive Infographic:  13 reasons your brain craves infographics  Ideal for displaying large amount of data  More engaging
  • 43. Production of infographics Methods, cost, time
  • 44. Production Methods: Custom Design  Most (very) expensive  (Semi-)Professional agencies  Graphic software  Specifically tailored to your needs
  • 45. Production Methods: Online tools  Infogr.am (infogr.am)  Piktochart (piktochart.com) => Best Pick  Venngage (venngage.com)  Easel.ly (easel.ly)  Visual.ly (visual.ly) => Best Pick  Canva (canva.com)  EWC Presenter (ewcpresenter.com)
  • 46. Production time 1 day - months
  • 47. Production cost  Online tools: • Free • Monthly subscription (5 - 100€ / month) • Freemium (premium items for fixed price)  Custom Design: • Static | € 400 – € 25000 • Interactive | € 5000 – …
  • 48. Building your own infographic
  • 49. Before you start  Define a clear aim for your infographic: persuasive? Informative? Comparative?
  • 50. Step 1: Research, gather, transform Data Building your own infographic
  • 51. Step 2: Draft, concept, build storyline Building your own infographic
  • 52. Find appropriate visual metaphors Is local food bad for the economy? 
  • 53. Find appropriate visual metaphors
  • 54. Find a descriptive, engaging title The fatal consequences of illegal drug dealing The best options for indoor plant lovers
  • 55. Data Building blocks  Geometric shapes – lead the eyes & provide structure  Charts & Diagrams – Visually represent data  Icons – clarify words  Images – add value
  • 56. Build a storyline with a logical flow Create a confusing Flow that Create a Logical flow That is easy to follow Is hard to understand  
  • 57. Build a storyline with a logical flow 
  • 58. Build a storyline with a logical flow
  • 59. Choose a focal point (if possible) 
  • 60. Charts: When to use which one? Matrix → Comparison of many items & many categories Donut chart → Simple share of total (max 2-3 parts), often in % Pie chart → Simple share of total (max 5-7 parts) Column chart → Comparison of a few items (1 category) Bar chart → Comparison of many items (1-2 categories)
  • 61. Step 3: Design & publish Building your own infographic
  • 62. Basic infographic structure HEADER BODY FOOTER ENGAGING TITLE + VISUAL SUBTITLE/ SHORT DESCRIPTION BLOCK 1 Visualized data & copy BLOCK 2 Visualized data & copy BLOCK 3 Visualized data & copy Disclaimer Publisher‟s mention Sources
  • 63. Don‟t sacrifice usability for design
  • 64. Visual History of Google Algorythm changes, by MOZ & Hubspot 
  • 65. Basic Design Principles  Lines & simple shapes  Whitespace & balance  Color  Typography
  • 66. Lines & simple shapes 
  • 67. Lines & simple shapes  Structure sections with shapes (essentially rectangles) and lines
  • 68. Whitespace & balance 
  • 69. Whitespace & balance  Leave enough space for the design to breathe
  • 70. Whitespace & balance
  • 71. Color 
  • 72. Color  Work with a limited color palette to ensure consistency
  • 73. Typography classification basics Sans-serif & Slab serif  Often safe Serif  Safe for titles, use with caution for body text Stylized (script, gothic)  Use with caution Comic Sans  Don’t you dare
  • 74. The importance of typography
  • 75. Now it‟s our turn Testing it on Piktochart
  • 76. See you next Friday Session 25/03/2014 Want to be the next speaker for a FAS? Drop us a message @cleverwood or via info@cleverwood.be Did you enjoy it? Join us for the next FAS!  FAS #65: 21/3 about Google Analytics Want to know more? www.cleverwood.be