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Friday Session #71 - Storytelling behind the hype by Jelle Annaars

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Look into any marketing blog or book from the last few years, and you're bound to read something about storytelling. Content professional Jelle Annaars will take us beyond the buzzword and all the way back to Aristoteles, explaining hands on how storytelling techniques can make your communications more effective.

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Friday Session #71 - Storytelling behind the hype by Jelle Annaars

  1. 1. FRIDAY SESSION #71 Storytelling behind the hype 12/12/2014 By Jelle Annaars @Cleverwood #FridaySession
  2. 2. Contents  Definition  Why storytelling?  The 7 basic plots  The Hero’s Journey  Who’s your hero?  What’s your message?  Effective storytelling examples 2
  3. 3. Definition “A story is any account of connected events, presented to the person reading or listener in a sequence of written or spoken words, or in a sequence of (moving) pictures.” 3
  4. 4. Definition A good story has:  a beginning  a middle  an end 4 Jean-Luc Godard: “A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end, but not necessarily in that order.”
  5. 5. Definition A good story has:  protagonist  inciting incident (“as usual, … until one day…”)  sequence, suspense  ending with some form of meaning or moral 5 Mark Twain: “a tale shall accomplish something and arrive somewhere.”
  6. 6. Why tell stories? Story is how—long, long ago—we learned to take the confusing flow of many things that happen and try to make sense of them. It’s a fundamental way that humans organize and store information. 6
  7. 7. Why tell stories? Stories catch our attention. 7 David Mamet: “The audience will not tune in to watch information. You wouldn’t, I wouldn’t. No one would or will. The audience will only tune in and stay tuned in to watch drama.”
  8. 8. Why tell stories? We remember stories, not facts 8
  9. 9. Why tell stories? It’s a way to stand out in times of Content Shock 9
  10. 10. 7 Basic plots  Roughly, only 7 stories exist  After research by Carl Jung 10
  11. 11. 7 Basic plots 1. Overcoming the monster 11 • Perseus, James Bond, Star Wars 2. Rags to riches • Cinderella, Great Expectations 3. The Quest • The Wizard of Oz, Lord of the Rings 4. Voyage and Return • Odyssey, Alice in Wonderland, Gone with the wind, Gravity
  12. 12. 7 Basic plots 5. Comedy 12 • A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Bridget Jones Diary, Mr. Bean 6. Tragedy • Romeo & Juliet, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Black Swan 7. Rebirth • Beauty and the Beast, A Christmas Carol, Despicable Me
  13. 13. Business examples 13
  14. 14. Business examples 14
  15. 15. Business examples 15
  16. 16. Business examples 16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. The Hero’s Journey 1. Overcoming the monster 18 • Jaws, James Bond, Star Wars 2. Rags to riches • Cinderella, Great Expectations 3. The Quest • The Wizard of Oz, Lord of the Rings 4. Voyage and Return • Odyssey, Alice in Wonderland, Gone with the wind
  19. 19. The Hero’s Journey (Joseph Campbell) 19
  20. 20. The Hero’s Journey (Joseph Campbell) Simplified:  Hero (protagonist)  Who wants something  Obstacles or antagonist  Help of a mentor  Balance restored & life improved Think Star Wars, The Matrix, … 20
  21. 21. Who’s your hero Who’s your hero? 21
  22. 22. Who’s your hero “If your stories are all about your products and services, and how they help improve your customers’ businesses, that’s not really storytelling…it’s a brochure.” – Jay Baer (Convince & Convert) 22
  23. 23. The Hero’s Journey (Joseph Campbell) Classic example: Apple’s 1984 ad. They could have just said: we make better computers… 23
  24. 24. Who’s your hero Tips to connect to your audience using story  Let your audience be the hero  You are the mentor/helper 24
  25. 25. Who’s your hero Tips to connect to your audience using story  Or let the hero be someone they can empathize with  Your personal story  Another audience member’s story 25
  26. 26. What’s your message?  What does the sequence or outcome of the story tell us?  What’s your moral or message? 26
  27. 27. Effective examples The LEGO Movie Messages: there is a builder in each one of us, be imaginative, you’re never too old 27
  28. 28. Effective examples Boeing When you are the hero, make it interesting 28
  29. 29. Effective examples General Electrics When you are the hero, make it interesting 29
  30. 30. Effective examples 1,000 Stories (women in business) Using stories to motivate others, and then persuade lawmakers, financial industry, ... 30
  31. 31. Effective examples Hollaback’s 1,000 Stories Classic use of the Hero’s Journey to build a community 31
  32. 32. Effective examples Greenacres Woodland Burials You can use/share stories on a very small scale 32
  33. 33. Effective examples Mountaintop Library It doesn’t have to be expensive 33
  34. 34. Q & A 34
  35. 35. Thank you ! 35 Jelle Annaars Trainer Mobile: +32 485 524 744 jelle.annaars@cleverwood.be Twitter: @78inch

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