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Demonstrating the Quality & Significance of Teaching
 

Demonstrating the Quality & Significance of Teaching

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    Demonstrating the Quality & Significance of Teaching Demonstrating the Quality & Significance of Teaching Presentation Transcript

    • New Faculty Success Workshop: Demonstrating the Quality & Significance of Teaching Effectiveness Meghan Burke, CETL October, 2009 (with thanks to Linda Noble & Bill Hill) kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • If you teach, learn to do it well; if you do it well, learn to do it better.
      • Ludy Benjamin
      • Glasscock Professor of Teaching Excellence
      • Texas A&M University
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Faculty Performance Areas at KSU
      • Teaching, Supervision, & Mentoring
      • Research & Creative Activity
      • Professional Service
      • Administration & Leadership
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Focus of Today’s Workshop
      • Teaching, Supervision, & Mentoring
        • Teaching: development of knowledge, understanding, and application
        • Supervision: learner is engaged in a fixed period of time in a structured academic experience with specified learning outcomes
        • Mentoring: facilitate and enhance the academic & professional success of an individual (student or faculty)
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Small Group Discussion of Effective Teaching
      • Form dyads/triads and generate a list of the “Top Five” characteristics of effective teaching.
      • You might approach this through sharing descriptions of the “Best Teacher” you had as a student
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • What is Effective Teaching? kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Warning Signs of Ineffective Teaching
      • (From University of West Florida standards)
      • Student evaluations document consistent & substantive problems
      • Teaching philosophy poorly articulated or expressed
      • Syllabi fail to establish clear expectations
      • Assessment practices inadequate
      • No continuous improvement efforts
      • Pedagogical practices unsound (e.g.: disorganized, poor feedback; standards too lax or too challenging; disengaging classroom environment)
      • Student support practices unsound (e.g., late to class, not responding to student email, not keeping office hours, showing favoritism)
      • Special teaching assignments or developmental experiences avoided
      • Chronic academic integrity concerns
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Demonstrating Effectiveness
      • New Guidelines Expectations
      • (Faculty Handbook Section 5)
        • Pedagogical intentions
        • Evidence of student learning
      • It is no longer enough to demonstrate our teaching effectiveness by talking about the things we do (our pedagogical intentions). We now have to talk about how what we do facilitates student learning.
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Scholarly Teaching (Richlin, 2006) kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (Richlin, 2006) kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • An Example of Scholarly Teaching
      • An English teacher attends a session at a teaching conference and learns about the use of pop quizzes to encourage students to read the material before a planned class discussion. She implements the technique the next semester and then analyzes the quiz scores and other student data to measure its effectiveness. Based on her results she decides whether to continue to use the technique or try something else. The use of her results and what she has learned impacts primarily her courses.
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • An Example of SoTL
      • “ We tested a procedure designed to enhance psychology students’ learning from educational videos. Introductory psychology students (N=127) watched a video about social psychology during a regular class section. Students in some sections of the course watched the video with no special instructions; students in other sections answered 8 guiding questions in writing while watching the video. After viewing the video, students took a test containing video-related and textbook-related questions. As predicted, students who received guiding questions scored significantly higher on the video-related questions than did those in the control group; there was no effect of experimental condition on the students’ performance on the textbook-related questions.”
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • An Example of SoTL
      • Lawson, Bodle, Houlette, & Haubner (2006). Guiding Questions Enhance Student Learning from Educational Videos. Teaching of Psychology , 33(1): 31-33.
        • Consulted existing literature
        • Used a “control” class
        • Used actual measure of student learning
        • Started with a conference presentation of their results
        • Submitted the findings for publication
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Steps to Highly Effective Teaching
      • Basic Expectations
      • Course Syllabi
      • Philosophy of Teaching
      • Alignment of Instructional Activities with Philosophy and Goals
      • Assess your Effectiveness
      • Reflection and making adjustments
      • Only becomes SoTL when you disseminate
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • KSU Criteria for Appraising Teaching Effectiveness
      • Pedagogical Skills
      • Professionalism
      • Assessment of Student Learning
      • Professional Development
      • Reflective Practice
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Pedagogical Skills Examples
      • Demonstrates skill, experience, & creativity with a range of appropriate pedagogies & technologies
      • Designs courses to meet student needs at their developmental level in the subject/profession
      • Communicates effectively
      • Manages class time well
      • Provides effective mentoring and/or supervision of students
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Professionalism Examples
      • Consistently Ethical Behavior, e.g.:
      • Demonstrates concern & respect for student welfare, learning, & development
      • Demonstrates fairness & consistency
      • Is approachable & accessible to students
      • Upholds academic integrity
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Assessment of Student Learning Examples
      • Gives timely feedback designed to help students improve
      • Conducts examinations & assignments that are fair & appropriate for the desired learning outcomes
      • Uses a variety of strategies to assess student learning
      • Documents that extent to which students achieve the learning outcomes & shares this information as appropriate for the assessment of the course or program
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Professional Development Examples
      • Pursues appropriate professional development opportunities & integrates into instruction
      • Stays current with practice, trends, & issues related to courses taught
      • Contributes to professional dialogue on teaching
      • Conducts research, presents, and publishes Scholarship of Teaching & Learning
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Reflective Practice Examples
      • Uses the results of assessments to improve the quality of instruction
      • Examines and improves the methods of student assessment
      • Adjusts teaching practices based on relevant evaluations from students, peers, and/or chair
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Assessing TS&M
      • Two measures required:
        • University-wide student comments
          • Administer the last two weeks of classes
          • All classes (every term, including summer)
        • One additional measure
          • See department or college policy
          • Can come from:
            • Oneself
            • Students
            • Peers or other professional sources
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Analyzing Student Comments
      • Read all comments for a particular course.
      • Divide into 3 categories:
        • Constructive: e.g., “Not enough grades.”
        • Vague: e.g., “Great teacher.”
        • Out of instructor’s control, e.g., “The class meets too early in the morning.”
      • Record repeated themes that may indicate high effectiveness or need for improvement.
      • Place comments in context of new or required approaches (always less popular); try to focus on learning gains.
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • Annual Teaching Narrative
      • (Check with department)
      • Less than 3 pages
      • Copy of each year in T&P portfolio
      • Content:
        • Measures used to evaluate effectiveness
        • Changes made and why
        • Areas of improvement
        • Goals that have been set
        • Plans for professional development
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop
    • References
      • Buskist, W., Sikorski, J., Buckley, T., & Saville, B. K. (2002). Elements of Master Teaching. In S. F. Davis & W. Buskist (Eds.), The Teaching of Psychology: Essays in Honor of Wilbert J. McKeachie and Charles L. Brewer (pp. 27-39). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
      • Lawson, Bodle, Houlette, & Haubner (2006). “Guiding Questions Enhance Student Learning from Educational Videos.” Teaching of Psychology , 33(1): 31-33.
      • Richlin, L. (2001). “Scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching.” In Kreber, C. (ed.), Scholarship revisited: Perspectives on the scholarship of teaching. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, no.86. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.
      • Richlin, L. (2006). Blueprint For Learning: Constructing College Courses to Facilitate, Assess, and Document Learning. Sterling, Virgina: Stylus Publishing.
      kennesaw.edu/cetl New Faculty Success Workshop