Student teacher assessment

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Student teacher assessment

  1. 1. Student andTeacher Assessment
  2. 2. Assessment <ul><li>Classroom assessment is simply a means to discover if our students are learning what we are teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Instructors need effective ways to monitor learning throughout the language course </li></ul><ul><li>The fundamental questions necessary to ask are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“What are our students learning?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“How effectively are we teaching?” </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Assessment Improves Teaching <ul><li>The data collected from various assessment activities is very useful for improving teaching and learning. For example this can: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help students learn how to study </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage teachers to analyze objectively what happens in the classroom </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Guide students in a self-analysis of their own learning processes </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Assessment Improve Learning <ul><li>The purpose of classroom assessment is to improve both learning and teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Students are encouraged to focus on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>learning the knowledge and skills of the course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>how well their learning is proceeding </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teachers focus on the success of their teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Teachers are given an opportunity to revise their methods </li></ul>
  5. 5. Process <ul><li>Classroom assessment involves </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the design phase </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the assessment activity itself </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the follow-up to the assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Structured feedback should be shared between the instructors and students </li></ul>
  6. 6. Examples <ul><li>The One-Minute Paper (Angelo and Cross 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Please answer each of the following questions in one or two sentences: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What was the most useful/meaningful thing you learned during this session? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What question(s) remain uppermost in your mind as we end this session? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Assessing for Problems <ul><li>Structure a short five-to seven-minute writing exercise in which students address these questions in class: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is creating problems for you at this time? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is the source of the problem in the material, in the manner of teaching, or in your learning effort? </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Problems <ul><li>What would help solve the problem? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you do as a student? </li></ul><ul><li>What can I do as the teacher? </li></ul>
  9. 9. Conclusion <ul><li>Improve both learning and teaching through effective assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make necessary changes to instruction from information collected through the assessment process </li></ul><ul><li>Allow students to provide feedback to instructor for what is helping them learn and what more could be provided </li></ul>
  10. 10. Works Cited: <ul><li>Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching; Classroom Assessment Techniques; Diane M. Enerson, Kathryn M. Plank, and R. Neill Johnson. Penn State University www.psu.edu/celt/CATs.html </li></ul><ul><li>Litechy, Larry. CreatingActive Learning. Community College Press, 1998 </li></ul>

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