Crafting Collaboration
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Crafting Collaboration

on

  • 1,668 views

Many design and development processes are created with the purpose of communicating how stuff gets done without deep consideration of what will make the work better. And that's a problem. In a ...

Many design and development processes are created with the purpose of communicating how stuff gets done without deep consideration of what will make the work better. And that's a problem. In a digital space of increasingly complex problems, real innovation requires a focus on integrating disciplines in the right place and the right time. And craft, by extension, is no longer just about the deep knowledge and skill one brings to a discipline, like interaction design or coding, but about how our work is influenced by voices and perspectives beyond our area of expertise. Having conditions that facilitate the potential for those sublime encounters where something great is decided or learned or invented will not only enhance our craft but take the design to a better place. But how do we get there? This talk will reflect on the challenges of supporting collaboration and craft in a business context as well as some ideas about how to bring about change.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,668
Views on SlideShare
1,627
Embed Views
41

Actions

Likes
10
Downloads
38
Comments
2

4 Embeds 41

http://lanyrd.com 20
https://twitter.com 9
http://datsja.tumblr.com 7
http://eventifier.co 5

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Hi Dear,

    Compliment s of the season !!
    Um, i am miss ROSINA by name, i wish
    to have you as my friend so shall we be good friends ? I want us to base
    on mutual friendship because A 'Hello' today can mean a friendship tomorrow. Friendship is a word, the very sight of which in print makes the heart warm. A stranger is just a friend you haven't met yet; we got to take time to be friendly because it's the road to happiness so reach me at ( rosinaedward11@hotmail.com) i will send you my photo thanks.
    My best regards,
    ROSINA
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • like!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Ever hear of the MalcomGladwell 1000 hour rule? Well I did some calculating and the things I've done or would like to do more of shake out to look something like this.
  • It's also why I was so excited about the topic for this conference. Craft is something I've been thinking about a while. And as creative director, I've had the time to observe lots and lots of designers and how they work. So in a lot of ways, craft is an outcome of expertise.
  • The teacher in me had to break this down, but the creative director also wanted to reflect on what I’ve observed in my teams. I’ve seen all too many people get by with what they think is a high level of craft or expertise when it’s something they’ve maybe only done once. It's amazing how we can convince ourselves that we have something when we really don't.
  • I've seen a lot of young designers who come straight out of grad school thinking they should jump into a senior role and I tell them that while their thinking is good, they just haven't had enough revolutions in the work. The other downside is seeing people who either work as a team of one or who have never had to work with someone better than they are.
  • In grad school, it took writing 5 screen plays until I truly understood the rules of dramatic structure.
  • Okay. Remember the answer because I’m going to ask you again. Of those of you who have your hands raised how many of you have been working for less than 5 years on this particular craft?
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • But take a moment and think about that definition of craft against what we really do. In a digital space we’ve developed a notion of craft around intangibles. Stuff that not everyone one can see.  And it's something that we not only arrive at iteratively, but be keep changing even after it's being used.  (Unlike in a movie, for example.) 
  • I mean how many times have a person come up to you to say. “I just check out your website. There must have been some awesome content matrix behind that experience.”These guys are actually doing something that will contribute greatly to their work. A lot of our time is spent doing stuff like this to get to something someone can actually use.
  • And until recently the most common approach was for teams to practice a kind of hand off, from one discipline to the next.   
  • It’s one of the things we talk about all the time at R/GA. But if it’s not hitting you now. It will very soon.
  • We’re faced with building craft around something that’s not only intangible, but…So does that same definition of craft apply to what we do? How can it not be alittle different. After all...
  • ----- Meeting Notes (12/11/12 00:32) -----So here's what I think...
  • And both of those things are influenced by the context in which we work. There's so much thought work behind the design, that that too needs to be an consideration for craft. And the complexity is demanding that we literally work differently. So, how do we cultivate craft in a an intangible, increasingly complex always changing space?
  • No matter what the institutional barrier. The first thing is to take stock in your thinking. It’s the first shift that needs to happen before you’ll be able to collaborate effectively.
  • But you could also approach the way you think as a kind of craft. Craftfulthinking ensures that you won't settle on an idea too quickly.  That you'll be open to possibilities beyond your best first stab.  That you'll actively open to seeing how your work can be improved and push yourself to iterate more.  It's also the space that will enable to you open up to new ideas. 
  • Other have so much doubt that they spin and spin until  they're  in a big knotted Bunch (you've seen it right?) This is the guy who’s over analyzing.
  • The uncritical/divergent mindhas no fear in exploring the outer regions of possibilityderives insight from multiple sourcesis purely in the momentThe critical/convergent mindseeks a clear path to solutionslooks for ways to align/recombineis critical/reflective in its approac
  • What you do now needs to include the active solicitation of input from others outside your discipline. 
  • Think of this in the same way you’d think of a Jazz band.
  • Lately, we’ve been doing collaborative sketch sessions with the client. In this room, you’ll find technologists, business people, designers…
  • Saying that anyone can master a craft also suggests that there’s an end point in where we are suddenly experts and no longer need to continue to learn. I can tell you how many times I’ve seen that trip people up in their careers.
  • But because of the complexity of what we’re dealing with, we can’t know everything up front.
  • So we created this idea of design sprints.
  • The problem with everything up to now is that it poses a project manager’s night mare.
  • Talk about Bell labs. Its staff worked on the incremental improvements necessary for a complex national communications network while simultaneously thinking far ahead, toward the most revolutionary inventions imaginable.Mervin Kelly was convinced that physical proximity was everything; phone calls alone wouldn’t do. Quite intentionally, Bell Labs housed thinkers and doers under one roof. Purposefully mixed together on the transistor project were physicists, metallurgists and electrical engineers; side by side were specialists in theory, experimentation and manufacturing.Traveling the hall’s length without encountering a number of acquaintances, problems, diversions and ideas was almost impossible.
  • So here’s my new definition.

Crafting Collaboration Crafting Collaboration Presentation Transcript

  • CRAFTINGCOLLABORATION InspireConference 2012 Cindy Chastain Leiden, NetherlandsReady to Inspire / December 2012 @cchastain
  • WHO I AMsketchartist, cinematographer, screenwriter, furnituremaker, teacher, experiencedesigner, mother, strategist, pianoplayer, business consultantReady to Inspire / December 2012 2
  • A BETTER REPRESENTATION OF WHO I AM10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0Ready to Inspire / December 2012 3
  • AREAS OF EXPERTISE (E.G. SOLID CRAFT)10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0Ready to Inspire / December 2012 4
  • What does “craft” mean,anyway?Ready to Inspire / December 2012 5
  • The thoughtful and consistentapplication of masteredpractices.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 6
  • HOW TO GET IT practice guidance (lots of it)Ready to Inspire / December 2012 7
  • HOW TO KNOW WHEN YOU HAVE IT• Youve internalized an approach• Decisions are well-judged and come quickly• The work is of a consistent high quality• You can teach it to someone elseReady to Inspire / December 2012 8
  • How many of you havemastered your craft?Ready to Inspire / December 2012 9
  • ideaReady to Inspire / December 2012 10
  • idea v2 launchReady to Inspire / December 2012 11
  • ideaReady to Inspire / December 2012 12
  • ideaReady to Inspire / December 2012 13
  • idea launchReady to Inspire / December 2012 14
  • idea v2 launchReady to Inspire / December 2012 15
  • stuff around intangibles and constant iterationReady to Inspire / December 2012 16
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012 17
  • Strategist Information Interaction/ Developer Architect visual designerReady to Inspire / December 2012 18
  • ARRIVING ATAN END PRODUCT Website!Ready to Inspire / December 2012 19
  • BUT HERE’SWHERE WE ARE NOW eventReady to Inspire / December 2012 20
  • intangiblecomplexalways changingReady to Inspire / December 2012 21
  • WEBSITES ARE NOT SHOESReady to Inspire / December 2012 22
  • In a digital space, craft is not just about mastering a practice or a set of skills; it’s also about how we think and how we collaborate.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 23
  • Tip #1:Start beingcraft-ful inyour thinkingReady to Inspire / December 2012 24
  • Your craft is clearly a product of your thinking.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 25
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012 26
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012 27
  • uncritical/divergent critical/convergentReady to Inspire / December 2012 28
  • What I’ve noticedReady to Inspire / December 2012 29
  • KEYTAKEAWAYS• Find ways to move between uncritical/divergent and critical/convergent modes.• Always ask yourself if you’re iterating enough.• Don’t be a hammer looking for a nail.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 30
  • Tip #2:Look beyondyour disciplineReady to Inspire / December 2012 31
  • You are no longer your own best resource.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 32
  • Strategist Information Interaction/ Developer Architect visual designerReady to Inspire / December 2012 33
  • Strategist Interaction/ visual designer Information Developer ArchitectReady to Inspire / December 2012 34
  • Information Architect Strategist Interaction/ visual designer DeveloperReady to Inspire / December 2012 35
  • Developer Strategist Interaction/ visual designer InformationReady to Inspire / December 2012 Architect 36
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012 37
  • KEYTAKEAWAYS• Know when to step forward, know when to step back.• Integrate others into your process.• Proactively seek input from others outside of your discipline.• Trust the ability of others to create with you.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 38
  • Tip #3:Give in toconstantlearningReady to Inspire / December 2012 39
  • Iteration and constant learning are like the carpenter’s plane of a digital product.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 40
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012 41
  • DESIGN PROCESS Learning Learning Learning LearningReady to Inspire / December 2012 42
  • DESIGN PROCESS What is it? How does How do we How is it it work? build it? performing?Ready to Inspire / December 2012 43
  • THE DESIGN SPRINTReady to Inspire / December 2012 44
  • MUTIPLE DESIGN SPRINTS Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Sprint 3 Sprint 4 New learning New learning New learning New learningReady to Inspire / December 2012 45
  • OVERLAPPING DESIGN & DEV SPRINTS Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Sprint 3 Sprint 4UXDev Ready to Inspire / December 2012 46
  • KEYTAKEAWAYS• Go deep (in a reasonable time)• Shift your mental model of process from linear to iterative.• Be flexible and adapt to new inputs along the way.• Be prepared to change up your approach as technology changes.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 47
  • Tip #4:Find ways toincite changeReady to Inspire / December 2012 48
  • Preserving craft requires setting up the right conditions.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 49
  • ORGANIZATIONAL ROADBLOCKS• Non-agile project management approaches• Budgets that count resource hours• Space that doesn’t facilitate communication and collaboration• Management that doesn’t encourage learning• Siloed team structuresReady to Inspire / December 2012 50
  • Ready to Inspire / December 2012
  • Open design reviewsReady to Inspire / December 2012 52
  • Integrated, cross-pollinated team structuresReady to Inspire / December 2012 53
  • Flow timeReady to Inspire / December 2012 54
  • KEYTAKEAWAYS• Rethink your team structure• Create a culture of creativity• Give people time to work• Be flexible enough to change when it’s neededReady to Inspire / December 2012 55
  • A NEW DEFINITION OF CRAFTThe thoughtful and consistentapplication of mastered, yetevolving practices incollaboration with otherdisciplines.Ready to Inspire / December 2012 56
  • Thanks! Cindy Chastain @cchastain chastaincm@gmail.comReady to Inspire / December 2012 57