Consumer foodservice in australia

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Euromonitor International’s “Consumer Foodservice in Australia” is now available at ReportsnReports.com.

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Consumer foodservice in australia

  1. 1. Consumer Foodservice in AustraliaReport SummaryEXECUTIVE SUMMARYConsumers upgrade during economic slowdownAlthough performing far better than other economies around the world, the Australian economy,particularly the retail category, was virtually stagnant throughout 2010. Consumer foodservice appearedto be a major exception, with consumers deciding that food was an “affordable indulgence”, where forjust a couple of dollars extra they could enjoy something special. This trend was especially visible in fastfood, where such concepts as “gourmet pizza”, championed by Crust Gourmet Pizza, and Pizza Capers,and “gourmet burgers”, championed by Grill’d, was the most notable feature in consumer foodservice in2010.Taking it awayWhile consumers embraced Australia consumer foodservice market in 2010, they still prefer to eat inthe comfort of their own home, where they can watch television and do not have to get dressed up.100% HDTA therefore represented the fastest growing category in consumer foodservice, while otherchains which do offer dine-in options have seen their takeaway component increase in recent years. Asconsumer foodservice slowly shifts to being a 24-hour industry, drive-thru outlets have provenparticularly successful.McDonald’s still the Big MacAlthough Subway has more outlets, when it comes to value share McDonald’s is the largest player inAustralia consumer foodservice, even if the additional share provided by McCafé outlets is notincluded. The popularity of McDonald’s in Australia, where its popularity is greater than most othermarkets around the world, is due in part to having spent the last decade improving its reputationthrough such measures as a “Healthy Choice” menu, and the introduction of McCafé, both of whichwere Australian innovations. In 2010, however, continued growth was largely due to the popularity ofMcDonald’s’ range of Angus burgersChains continue takeoverAlthough they make up only around a third of the total value of consumer foodservice in Australia,chains continue to grow in importance, as emerging players in consumer foodservice embrace thefranchise system as a means of expanding their brands as rapidly as possible. This system slowed downconsiderably during the economic slowdown due to the highly publicised failures of Krispy Kreme andSouvlaki Hut, uncertainty regarding proposed legislation, and difficulties in obtaining finance from thebanks.
  2. 2. Bright future for consumer foodserviceAlthough the difficulties involved in sourcing new franchisees during the economic slowdown will act assomething of a suppressing force over at least the early years of the forecast period, consumerfoodservice as a whole is likely to perform well. Specifically, the trend towards “affordable indulgences”will ensure that the consumers who embraced “gourmet pizzas” and “gourmet burgers” during theeconomic slowdown embrace them to an even greater degree as the economy recovers.Table of ContentsConsumer Foodservice in Australia - Industry OverviewEXECUTIVE SUMMARYConsumers upgrade during economic slowdownTaking it awayMcDonald’s still the Big MacChains continue takeoverBright future for consumer foodserviceKEY TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTSConsumer foodservice sales higher than everDomestic brands see greater successAll just a little bit fancyiFoodA time and a place for everythingFast food dietMARKET DATATable 1 Units, Transactions and Value Sales in Consumer Foodservice: 2005-2010Table 2 Units, Transactions and Value Sales in Consumer Foodservice: % Growth 2005-2010Table 3 Consumer Foodservice by Independent Vs Chained Outlets: Units/Outlets 2010Table 4 Consumer Foodservice by Eat in Vs Takeaway 2010Table 5 Consumer Foodservice by Food Vs Drinks Split 2010Table 6 Sales in Consumer Foodservice by Location 2005-2010Table 7 Leading Chained Consumer Foodservice Brands by Number of Units 2010Table 8 Chained Consumer Foodservice Company Shares 2006-2010
  3. 3. Table 9 Chained Consumer Foodservice Brand Shares 2007-2010Table 10 Forecast Units, Transactions and Value Sales in Consumer Foodservice: 2010-2015Table 11 Forecast Units, Transactions and Value Sales in Consumer Foodservice: % Growth 2010-2015APPENDIXNational Consumer ExpenditureTable 12 Consumer Expenditure on Consumer Foodservice 2007-2009Table 13 Consumer Expenditure on Consumer Foodservice 2004-2010Trade Association statisticsOPERATING ENVIRONMENTFranchisingDEFINITIONSSummary 1 Research SourcesConsumer Foodservice in Australia - Company ProfilesCoffee Club Pty Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 4 Coffee Club: Competitive Position 2010Eagle Boys Dial a Pizza Australia Pty Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 7 Eagle Boys Dial-A-Pizza Pty Ltd: Competitive Position 2010Franchised Food Group in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONING
  4. 4. Summary 10 Franchised Food Group: Competitive Position 2010Hogs Breath Café (Australia) Pty Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 13 Hog’s Breath Café Pty Ltd: Competitive Position 2010Jireh International Pty Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 16 Jireh International: Competitive Position 2010Quick Service Restaurant Holdings in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 19 Quick Service Restaurant Holdings: Competitive Position 2010Retail Food Group Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 22 Retail Food Group: Competitive Position 2010The Retail Zoo Pty Ltd in Consumer Foodservice (Australia)STRATEGIC DIRECTIONKEY FACTSCOMPANY BACKGROUNDSUPPLIERSCOMPETITIVE POSITIONINGSummary 25 The Retail Zoo Pty Ltd: Competitive Position 2010100% Home Delivery/Takeaway in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINES
  5. 5. TRENDSAlthough not experiencing quite the same spectacular growth as 2009, 100% HDTA still saw a good yearin 2010, with current value growth of 8% and outlet growth of 4%. Some of this slowdown was merelythe result of plateauing and consolidation after the strong growth of the two preceding years, and somewas simply due to stagnant growth in retail spending as a whole. In fact this stagnation of overall retailspending in the Australian economy contributed to the growth of 100% HDTA: consumers with a greaterpropensity to stay at home presented opportunities for an industry that can bring the food to them.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEWith competition in 100% HDTA intensifying in 2010, Domino’s remained the leading brand with 43%value share, although this slipped from 44% in 2009. Despite its attempts to compete with Eagle BoysDial-a-Pizza and Pizza Capers by innovating on the pizza crust instead of the toppings, it was theincreasingly exotic toppings of Eagle Boys Dial-A-Pizza that achieved the greatest gains. The company’svalue share increased from 20% in 2009 to 22% in 2010. It even acquired Pizza Haven, previously a majorplayer in 100% HDTA in Australia, but whose low-price positioning has become irrelevant, andconsequently the company had virtually disappeared at the time of writing.PROSPECTSDespite the slowdown in 2010 100% HDTA is a far more vibrant category in 2011 than it was even just acouple of years earlier. Consumers have become so used to being able to order online that they see noreason why they cannot do so for other cuisines. Recent years have seen a growing number of Chineseand Indian immigrants becoming franchisees in order to migrate to Australia on a business visa. Thisproduces an ideal environment for the expansion of Chinese and Indian chains, including within 100%HDTA – a category which is currently underdeveloped. It is other 100% HDTA, however, that is expectedto see the strongest growth over the forecast period, with an expected constant value CAGR of 10%.However, even by the end of the forecast period it will still only account for a small proportion of overallsales compared with pizza, representing only 3% of 100% HDTA’s total value in 2015.CATEGORY DATATable 14 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 15 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 16 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 17 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 18 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 19 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 20 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway 2006-2010
  6. 6. Table 21 Brand Shares of Chained 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway 2007-2010Table 22 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 23 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 24 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 25 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 26 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 27 Forecast Sales in 100% Home Delivery/Takeaway by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth2010-2015Cafés/Bars in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSCafés/bars had a tough year in 2010, with the value of the category falling by 2% in current value terms.This fall was seen predominately within bars/pubs, as consumers increasingly preferred to entertain athome during the economic slowdown.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEMcCafé’s surged in 2010 as existing McDonald’s establishments were renovated to incorporate McCaféoutlets. The existing network of McDonald’s is a distinct competitive advantage for McCafé, as it is ableto use the same retail footprint, as well as providing a means for McDonald’s to upsell to customers. TheMcCafé concept was originally conceived in Australia, where the establishments have been presentsince 1993 but 2009 and 2010 has seen their expansion to include the vast majority of McDonald’soutlets, thus pushing their value share of chained cafés/bars up from 26% in 2009 to 28% in 2010.PROSPECTSThe forecast period will be awkward for cafés/bars, with a constant value CAGR of only 2% predicted, asconsumers limit their spending over the forecast period. The strategy towards encouraging consumersto buy a meal in addition to coffee and a cake will pay dividends as the economy recovers, however, andconsumers become more willing to spend more.CATEGORY DATATable 28 Cafés/Bars by Category: Units/Outlets 2005-2010
  7. 7. Table 29 Cafés/Bars by Category: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 30 Cafés/Bars by Category: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 31 Cafés/Bars by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 32 Cafés/Bars by Category: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 33 Cafés/Bars by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 34 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained Cafés/Bars 2006-2010Table 35 Brand Shares of Chained Cafés/Bars 2007-2010Table 36 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 37 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 38 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 39 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 40 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 41 Forecast Sales in Cafés/Bars by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Consumer Foodservice by Location in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSStandalone locations remained dominant in 2010, making up 70% of outlets – a figure that edged downslightly, as consumer foodservice operators, continued to be attracted to retail locations. The number ofretail locations is limited, however, and instead the vast majority of consumer foodservice outlets are instandalone environments such as the high streets of Australian towns and suburbs.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEThe leading brands in concession operators are typically the same as those elsewhere, particularly in thecase of airports, in which the foodservice offerings closely resemble those seen in most popular retaillocations. Universities, being controlled in the main by left-leaning student unions, have typically beendistrustful of multinationals and chains in general, and are therefore largely catered to by independents.The main exception is Aroma Café, based in Western Australia, but whose outlets outside that state arealmost exclusively in universities and Technical and Further Education (TAFE) campuses.
  8. 8. PROSPECTSThe appetite of retail developers for new developments has fallen off since the global financial crisis,and with credit lending tight, has not yet recovered. This has not impacted upon consumer foodserviceas yet, since new shopping centres, planned prior to the global financial crisis, are still being completed.It will, however, have a significant impact going forward, putting the brakes on the expansion plans offranchises. Once consumer spending returns, there will be a lag of a few years until retail developmentspick up again. Until this occurs, most likely towards the end of the forecast period, vacant spaces inshopping centres will be difficult to come by, and be subject to rising rents. Consumer foodserviceoperators will need to focus on alternative locations, most notably standalone.CATEGORY DATATable 42 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 43 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 44 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 45 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 46 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 47 Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 48 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 49 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 50 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 51 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 52 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 53 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 54 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 55 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 56 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 57 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 58 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010
  9. 9. Table 59 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 60 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 61 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 62 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 63 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 64 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 65 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 66 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 67 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 68 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 69 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 70 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 71 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 72 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 73 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 74 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 75 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 76 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 77 Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 78 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 79 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 80 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 81 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015
  10. 10. Table 82 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 83 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales by Location: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Table 84 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 85 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 86 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 87 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 88 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 89 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Standalone: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Table 90 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 91 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 92 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 93 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 94 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 95 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Leisure: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Table 96 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 97 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 98 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 99 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 100 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 101 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Retail: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Table 102 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 103 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 104 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: Foodservice Value 2010-2015
  11. 11. Table 105 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 106 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 107 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Lodging: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Table 108 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 109 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 110 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 111 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 112 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 113 Forecast Consumer Foodservice Sales through Travel: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Fast Food in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSDespite the economic slowdown fast food had a particularly successful year in 2010, growing 7% incurrent value terms, down from the 9% increase of 2009. There were several reasons for this continuedstrong growth, including consumers reducing expenditure and thus trading down during the economicslowdown. At the same time, the boundaries between fast food and full-service restaurants areincreasingly blurred. This is due to the growth of chains that follow the “fast casual” concept, and a“gourmet” trend, which is particularly evident in pizza fast food and burger fast food. In pizza fast food,this was driven by new players such as Crust Gourmet Pizza and Pizza Capers, while burger fast food hasa new gourmet player: Grill’d. Meanwhile, established players, including leader McDonald’s, have addedvalue through such offerings as the Grand Angus and Mighty Angus, and its gourmet M Selections range.Each of these trends also contributed to the strong growth of 2009, but their influence was still felt in2010.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEMcDonald’s remains by far the largest player in fast food in Australia, holding a value share of over 30%in chained fast food, and an incredible 78% in chained burger fast food. This has long been one of thestrongest global markets for McDonald’s. One of the reasons for this is that the improvements in theMcDonald’s brand – in terms of health, for example – were initiated by McDonald’s in Australia, whichmade it more acceptable to consumers, many of whom previously considered McDonald’s’ offerings assimply junk food. Many consumers still do hold this perception, but increasingly McDonald’s is reapingthe benefits of its improved brand image. These initiatives include the integration of McCafé – initiallyinvented in Australia in 1993, and since adopted by McDonald’s around the world – into McDonald’s’
  12. 12. outlets, and its offering of free wi-fi. These efforts represented an important part of the company’sattempt to move away from its “fast food” image towards creating a more stylish environment in whichconsumers want to spend more time. As a result, not only has McCafé contributed to rising spend pertransaction within the combination of McDonald’s/McCafé, but it has also served to take share fromother competitors. However, spend per transaction within McDonald’s itself has edged down asconsumers choose a coffee instead of a Coke, for example.PROSPECTSMuch of the success of fast food in recent years has been due to the popularity of the Angus burger, theemergence of both “gourmet burgers” and “gourmet pizzas”, as well as the fast casual concept. Theimpact of these is likely to fade over the forecast period. Even though Grill’d, with a less than 1% valueshare in burger fast food, could potentially gain a couple of extra percentage points as it expands acrossAustralia, it remains only a minor player, and would have only a minor impact on the overall fast foodcategory. Furthermore, fast casual is unlikely to have a major impact on Australia, as the market alreadyhas a wide variety of inexpensive eating options, typically referred to as “cheap eats”. Although manyfast food operators, ranging from Nando’s to McDonald’s with its incorporation of McCafé, arerenovating their outlets to make them more attractive and encourage consumers to spend more, suchadditional expenditure is likely to be marginal. As a result, fast food is expected to experience a solidconstant value CAGR of 4% over the forecast period, while the premiumisation trend will increase spendper transaction from A$9.60 in 2010 up to A$10.06 in 2011.CATEGORY DATATable 114 Fast Food by Category: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 115 Fast Food by Category: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 116 Fast Food by Category: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 117 Fast Food by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 118 Fast Food by Category: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 119 Fast Food by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 120 Sales of Bakery Products Fast Food by Type 2007-2010Table 121 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained Fast Food 2006-2010Table 122 Brand Shares of Chained Fast Food 2007-2010Table 123 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 124 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: Number of Transactions 2010-2015
  13. 13. Table 125 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 126 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 127 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 128 Forecast Sales in Fast Food by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Full-Service Restaurants in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSDespite a general slowdown in retail over 2010, consumers still found reasons to engage in full-servicerestaurants, which have saw 4% current value growth that year. Although spend per transaction edgedup in full-service restaurants from A$39.15 in 2009 to A$39.87 in 2010, this impact was far less than inthe case of other categories. This was because consumers did not feel confident in spendingexcessively, and generally moved down from expensive full-service restaurants to casual diningestablishments, where the cost is much lower.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEFull-service restaurants in Australia are predominately independent, with only a small share – 3% ofoutlets and 6% of value – held by chains at the end of the review period. On those occasions whenconsumers may visit a full-service restaurant they tend to prefer a unique and more authenticexperience, that can be offered by a chain. However, as Australian consumers have become familiarwith Asian foods they have demonstrated a growing preference authentic, individual establishments inthis particular category. In North American restaurants, by contrast, being part of a chain is consideredpart of the cultural experience.PROSPECTSSudden and unanticipated fads for particular cuisines not taken into account, the constant value CAGRfor full-service restaurants is expected to be 2% over the forecast period. This will be driven mostly byAsian and Latin American full-service restaurants, as Australian consumers are attracted to cuisine whichthey are not capable of reproducing themselves at home. The potential growth of full-servicerestaurants will be impacted, however, by the “premiumisation” of other categories such as fast foodand cafés/bars. Both have improved their meal offerings and are therefore encroaching on theconsumers typically served by full-service restaurants, particularly at the value end of the market. This isa particular threat in terms of Latin American full-service restaurants, which will face growingcompetition from “fast casual”-style Latin American fast food establishments such as Salsa Fresh MexGrill.CATEGORY DATATable 129 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Units/Outlets 2005-2010
  14. 14. Table 130 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 131 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 132 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 133 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 134 Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 135 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained Full-Service Restaurants 2006-2010Table 136 Brand Shares of Chained Full-Service Restaurants 2007-2010Table 137 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 138 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 139 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 140 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 141 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 142 Forecast Sales in Full-Service Restaurants by Category: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Self-Service Cafeterias in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSThere is little tradition of self-service cafeterias in Australia, so any development of the category issporadic.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEThe only self-service cafeteria chain in Australia is MYO – “make your own”. This allows consumers tomake their own sandwiches and salads from component ingredients. Outlets are located within businessdistricts in order to capture busy office workers, and also those who have specific tastes.PROSPECTSAlthough MYO appears to be largely successful, it is not large enough to inspire other chains to emergewith their own take on the concept. Also, despite several years of expansion, the company had only 19outlets at the end of the review period – a significant number but not a run-away success.
  15. 15. CATEGORY DATATable 143 Self-Service Cafeterias: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 144 Self-Service Cafeterias: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 145 Self-Service Cafeterias: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 146 Self-Service Cafeterias: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 147 Self-Service Cafeterias: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 148 Self-Service Cafeterias: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 149 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained Self-Service Cafeterias 2006-2010Table 150 Brand Shares of Chained Self-Service Cafeterias 2007-2010Table 151 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 152 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 153 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 154 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 155 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 156 Forecast Sales in Self-Service Cafeterias: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Street Stalls/Kiosks in Australia - Category AnalysisHEADLINESTRENDSValue growth for street stalls/kiosks fell from 4% in 2009, down to 3% in 2010, to reach A$2.5billion. Thiscause of this slowing in growth can be attributed to conditions in the primary location of streetstalls/kiosks; as kiosks in Australia’s extensive collection of shopping centres, either as stand-alonekiosks or as part of a food court. Australian retail slowed in 2010, as consumer confidence was shaky,and retail traffic through shopping centres weakened.COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPEWith outlets in virtually every major Australian shopping centre, Donut King, Boost Juice and MuffinBreak are the largest players in street stalls/kiosks in Australia, with 18%, 16% and 15% value marketshare respectively, with Wendy’s Supa Sundaes close behind at 12%. Each of these brands have slipped
  16. 16. downwards in 2011, as consumers have stayed away from shopping centres and therefore the kiosks ofthese brands. Instead it has been the coffee-related and non-retail location based brands that haveexperienced the strongest growth.PROSPECTSThe slump that Australian retail has experienced over 2010 and 2011, is likely to continue as Australianconsumers stay away from shopping centres and decide instead to save. Alternatively, on those occasionwhen Australian consumers wish to make a purchase, they shall be increasingly likely to make thepurchase online. Either way, the amount of foot traffic in Australian shopping centres, upon which streetstalls/ kiosks rely, shall continue to be subdued over the forecast period, experiencing a negativeconstant value CAGR of -1%.CATEGORY DATATable 157 Street Stalls/Kiosks: Units/Outlets 2005-2010Table 158 Street Stalls/Kiosks: Number of Transactions 2005-2010Table 159 Street Stalls/Kiosks: Foodservice Value 2005-2010Table 160 Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Units/Outlets Growth 2005-2010Table 161 Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Transaction Growth 2005-2010Table 162 Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Foodservice Value Growth 2005-2010Table 163 Global Brand Owner Shares of Chained Street Stalls/Kiosks 2006-2010Table 164 Brand Shares of Chained Street Stalls/Kiosks 2007-2010Table 165 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: Units/Outlets 2010-2015Table 166 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: Number of Transactions 2010-2015Table 167 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: Foodservice Value 2010-2015Table 168 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Units/Outlets Growth 2010-2015Table 169 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Transaction Growth 2010-2015Table 170 Forecast Sales in Street Stalls/Kiosks: % Foodservice Value Growth 2010-2015Related Reports:Consumer Foodservice in AustriaConsumer Foodservice in Ukraine
  17. 17. Consumer Foodservice in HungaryConsumer Foodservice in TurkeyConsumer Foodservice in SpainConsumer Foodservice in ThailandConsumer Foodservice in SlovakiaConsumer Foodservice in the United KingdomAbout Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 100,000+ market research reports and in-depth marketresearch studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online and offline support toour customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market research reports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreportsContact:Mr.Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: + 1 888 391 5441E-mail: sales@reportsandreports.comhttp://www.reportsnreports.comVisit our Market Research Blog

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