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Feasibility Study
 

Feasibility Study

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    Feasibility Study Feasibility Study Presentation Transcript

    • FEASIBILITY STUDY
    • Feasibility Study
      • Sometimes called a recommendation report, is a conducted, after an exploratory work is performed, to assess whether a larger project is advisable. It aims to find out the probable market for the products; to determine the probable income of operating the project: and to show the contributions the project can offer to the society, among others.
    • Types of Feasibility Studies
    • Market and Real Estate Feasibility
      • Market Feasibility Study typically involves testing geographic locations for a real estate development project, and usually involves parcels of real estate land. Developers often conduct market studies to determine the best location within a jurisdiction, and to test alternative land uses for a given parcels. Jurisdictions often require developers to complete feasibility studies before they will approve a permit application for retail, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, housing, office or mixed-use project. Market Feasibility take into account the importance of the business in the selected area.
    • Technology and System Feasibility
      • This involves questions such as whether the technology needed for the system exists, how difficult it will be to build, and whether the firm has enough experience using that technology. The assessment is based on an outline design of system requirements in terms of Input, Processes, Output, Fields, Programs, and Procedures. This can be quantified in terms of volumes of data, trends, frequency of updating, etc in order to estimate if the new system will perform adequately or not.
    • Resource Feasibility
      • This involves questions such as how much time is available to build the new system, when it can be built, whether it interferes with normal business operations, type and amount of resources required, dependencies, etc. Contingency and mitigation plans should also be stated here so that if the project does over run the company is ready for this eventuality.
    • Cultural Feasibility
      • In this stage, the project's alternatives are evaluated for their impact on the local and general culture. For example, environmental factors need to be considered and this factors are to be well known. Further an enterprise's own culture can clash with the results of the project.
    • Operational feasibility'
      • Do the current work practices and procedures support a new system. Also social factors i.e. how the organizational changes will affect the working lives of those affected by the system..
    • Legal Feasibility
      • Determines whether the proposed system conflicts with legal requirements, e.g. a Data Processing system must comply with the local Data Protection Acts. When an organization has either internal or external legal counsel, such reviews are typically standard. However, a project may face legal issues after completion if this factor is not considered at this stage. it is about the authorization.
    • Schedule Feasibility
      • A project will fail if it takes too long to be completed before it is useful. Typically this means estimating how long the system will take to develop, and if it can be completed in a given time period using some methods like payback period.
    • Economic Feasibility
      • Economic analysis is the most frequently used method for evaluating the effectiveness of a candidate system. More commonly known as cost/benefit analysis, the procedure is to determine the benefits and savings that are expected from a candidate system and compare them with costs. if benefits outweigh costs, then the decision is made to design and implement the system.
        • THE END..
      • THANK YOU!