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Everyday Favors: A Case Study of a Local Online Gift Exchange System

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Slides of GROUP 2010 presentation of "Everyday Favors: A Case Study of a Local Online Gift Exchange System", Sanibel, Florida, Nov 8, 2010

Slides of GROUP 2010 presentation of "Everyday Favors: A Case Study of a Local Online Gift Exchange System", Sanibel, Florida, Nov 8, 2010

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  • Tää versio tuli vastaan, en tiedä oisko kivempi, ei ehkä ees oo, nakkasin nyt tänne jos johonkin tarvitaan 
  • Overall, respondents considered the service useful in a campus setting
    …but for who?
    Kassi is new – majority of respondents wished there were more users
    Kassi was considered easy to use
  • Articulating particular reasons seemed difficult for users.
  • Reasons for NOT using the service where more precise
  • Many exchanges happen with the help of the service but without leaving traces to the system
  • What’s in it for me, what’s in it for them
    “How do we get the engine started?”
    contextual interest and/orgeolocated groupscommunity effects, solidaritythere's no silver bullet for starting a community
  • Should there be less text here? Would just the questions be enough? Does the contents make sense?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Everyday Favors: A Case Study of a Local Online Gift Exchange System Emmi Suhonen, Aalto University School of Science and Technology Airi Lampinen, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology Coye Cheshire, Berkeley School of Information Judd Antin, Yahoo! Research November 8, 2010 GROUP’10: Create, Donate, Collaborate
    • 2. We all have skills and possessions that others need but do not have. At the same time, we often lack some resources ourselves, and can benefit from seeking others who can help…
    • 3. 1. A geolocated community: students on a university campus 2. Online – offline interaction 3. Generalized exchange 4. System allows many different ways to participate in collective action Aspects that render Kassi interesting
    • 4. Profile Listings Favors Items What can we do? How can we help each other? What items can we lend? What is sold or given away?
    • 5. • What reasons do people have for participation? • What affects the quantity of participation? • How can gift exchange systems be designed to encourage positive participation? USERS' MOTIVATIONS TO CONTRIBUTE TO AN ONLINE GIFT EXCHANGE SYSTEM WITHIN A GEOLOCATED COMMUNITY
    • 6. Two-wave survey • September 2009 (N=72) & March 2010 (N=84) • Open ended questions “Why did you or didn’t listed favors in your profile?” • Likert-scale questions “Kassi is a useful service in a campus setting” RESEARCH MATERIAL Usage Logs
    • 7. User activity Favor Item Other Posting a listing (N=459) 38 (8%) 362 (79%) 59 (13%) Adding a profile offering (N=330) 120 (36%) 210 (64%) N/A Completing an exchange (N=103) 34 (32%) 68 (65%) 3 (3%) Total (N=984) 192 (22%) 640 (72%) 62 (7%) USAGE PATTERNS
    • 8. Statement All (N=84) Frequent (N=19) Infrequent (N=28) Kassi is a useful service in a campus setting. 88% 95% 82% Kassi is a useful service for me personally. 39% 56% 18% I wish Kassi had more users. 87% 100% 82% I think Kassi is easy to use. 71% 84% 61% ATTITUDES TOWARDS KASSI
    • 9. http://www.flickr.com/photos/marcinmoga/4240686102/lightbox/ REASONS TO USE KASSI 1. “Just for fun” 2. “It’s nice to help” 3. The service is local: trust and ease of exchanging with one’s community
    • 10. Reasons related to user Number of instances (N=181) Difficulty of figuring out what items and favors to list. 71 Nothing to offer (no items or skills). 42 Difficulty of completing the exchanges offline and not worth it. 19 Doesn’t live close enough. 11 Reasons related to service Not interested in the service. 26 Uncertainty of the service. 5 Not knowing this is possible. 7 USERS’ REASONS NOT TO USE KASSI
    • 11. REASONS THAT INHIBIT THE USE OF KASSI ©DrJohnBullas (Flickr) ©DrJohnBullas (Flickr) 1. Lack of practices and social culture for gift exchange with strangers 2. Lack of operational information 3. Lack of examples 4. Social inconvenience
    • 12. 1. Problematic for research and design 2. …but not necessarily for end-users – their goals can be achieved effectively 3. Challenge: How to give people feedback & show the activities in the system without complicating use? INVISIBLE EXCHANGES http://www.flickr.com/photos/supersonicphotos/4483487579/
    • 13. 1. Generalized exchange can feel puzzling – incentives? 2. Asking for help may feel awkward even when others have explicitly stated their willingness to help 3. Contextual interest and/or geo-location helps, especially when completing exchanges requires meeting face-to-face RECIPROCITY http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeff-bauche/2230236391/
    • 14. INTERPRETATION & INTERVENTION 1. How the existing culture should be taken in account? 2. How can we create a culture of generalized gift exchange?  Balance between interpreting and changing culture http://www.flickr.com/photos/m0php/530526644/
    • 15. 1. Online exchange is a rising phenomenon and attitudes towards it are favorable but there are challenges to tackle 2. Interplay of online and offline interaction 3. Participation requires learning and shared understanding – Items vs favors – Generalized exchange may feel puzzling or awkward – Feedback and examples CONCLUSIONS http://www.flickr.com/photos/marcinmoga/4240686102/lightbox/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/supersonicphotos/4483487579/
    • 16. THANKS! Emmi Suhonen, Aalto University School of Science and Technology, emmi.suhonen@tkk.fi Airi Lampinen, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, airi.lampinen@hiit.fi Coye Cheshire, UC Berkeley, School of Information, coye@ischool.berkeley.edu Judd Antin, Yahoo! Research, jantin@yahoo-inc.com