Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Gender and Race:  Workplace Benefits and Job Satisfaction of American Workers Dina Banerjee Department of Sociology Purdue...
Situating this study in STEM contexts <ul><li>Women and minority scholars in 2009 are earning advanced degrees in remarkab...
Previous Literature:  Gender, Work and Occupation (1/4) <ul><li>Workplace benefits and policies significantly impact worke...
<ul><li>Workplace well-being is measured primarily in terms of </li></ul><ul><li>workers’: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Income (S...
<ul><li>Job satisfaction is a primary component of workers’ well-being  BUT  job satisfaction is examined in terms  of the...
This empirical literature does not examine the impacts of workplace benefits and policies on the job satisfaction of the w...
Research Questions <ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between female and male workers?  </li></ul><ul><li...
Data:  National Study of Changing Workforce 2002 <ul><li>Sample: Nationally representative across all workers of USA  </li...
Measurement <ul><li>Dependent var:  Job satisfaction, 4 items ( α  = 0.81) </li></ul><ul><li>Independent var:  Workplace b...
Methods: quantitative analyses <ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between female and male workers?  </li>...
Results: RQ1 and RQ2 <ul><li>Job satisfaction  was significantly higher among women workers  compared to men workers (p<0....
OLS regression.  Dependent variable: Job satisfaction Results: RQ3 Model 1 Model 2 Gender (Women) + p<0.001 + p<0.01 Race ...
OLS regression.  Dependent variable: Job satisfaction Results: RQ3 Model 3 Gender (Women) + p<0.01 Race (Non-white) + p<0....
Conclusions <ul><li>This study suggests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Job satisfaction is   an important element of workers’ well...
Implications in General <ul><li>From the literature, these factors are significant predictors of workers’ job satisfaction...
Implications for STEM Academia in Particular <ul><li>Academic jobs might differ than many jobs in the database of this res...
Discussion Connecting the thought to ADVANCE research………………………………
Questions? Thank you for your time and attention! Dina Banerjee [email_address]
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Gender and Race: Workplace Benefits and Job Satisfaction of the American Workers. By Dina Banerjee

2,356

Published on

The purpose of my paper is to examine the impacts of workplace-related benefits on the job satisfaction of salaried workers in the U.S. labor market. In so doing, I also compare and contrast job satisfaction of the female and male workers as well as that of the white and non-white workers. Literature on gender, work and occupation underpins the impact of workplace benefits and policies on the well-being of the workers. The literature also suggests that this well-being varies across gender and race. Using this theoretical background, I ask: (1) Is there any difference in job
satisfaction between female and male workers? (2) Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between white and non-white workers? and (3) What are the impacts of workplace benefits on the job satisfaction of the workers? Using the data from the National Study of Changing Workforce (2002), I define workplace benefits as the workers’ ‘workplace autonomy,’ ‘personal benefits’ and, ‘child care benefits.’ I conduct quantitative methods of analyses and the findings show that job satisfaction significantly varies across gender and race. And workplace autonomy and personal benefits have considerable impacts on the job satisfaction of the workers. I interpret the results in terms of the gendered and racial perspectives on job satisfaction.

Published in: Education, Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,356
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Gender and Race: Workplace Benefits and Job Satisfaction of the American Workers. By Dina Banerjee"

  1. 1. Gender and Race: Workplace Benefits and Job Satisfaction of American Workers Dina Banerjee Department of Sociology Purdue University
  2. 2. Situating this study in STEM contexts <ul><li>Women and minority scholars in 2009 are earning advanced degrees in remarkable numbers but they are often reluctant to pursue their careers in academia (Schoening 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Situation is severe among the women and minority members </li></ul><ul><li>in the STEM disciplines (Chesler and Chesler 2002; Van Cleave 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Work related experiences of people who discontinue their academic careers in STEM are often explained by the theory of “pipeline” (Chesler and Chesler 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Job satisfaction of the scholars in academia is one of the primary factors for them to stay back in their careers and continue with the pipeline (Stevens et al. 2008) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Previous Literature: Gender, Work and Occupation (1/4) <ul><li>Workplace benefits and policies significantly impact workers’ well-being (Schoening 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Men workers experience greater well-being than women workers (Aisenbrey et al. 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>White workers experience greater well-being than non-white workers (Hofferth and Curtin 2006) </li></ul>HOWEVER…
  4. 4. <ul><li>Workplace well-being is measured primarily in terms of </li></ul><ul><li>workers’: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Income (Schoening 2009) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work-family conflicts (Marcus 2007) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promotional opportunities (Ginther and Kahn 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work-related stress (Harper et al. 2001) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Depression (Harper et al. 2001) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Intergroup relations (Ferrarini 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace performance (Baum 2002) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficiency (Baum 2002) </li></ul></ul>NEVERTHELESS… Previous Literature: Gender, Work and Occupation (2/4)
  5. 5. <ul><li>Job satisfaction is a primary component of workers’ well-being BUT job satisfaction is examined in terms of the workers’: </li></ul><ul><li>Income (Schoening 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Promotional opportunities (Ginther and Kahn 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>Work-family spillover (Marcus 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Sex-segregation in the workplace (Banerjee 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Racial segregation in the workplace (Banerjee 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Inter-group relations (Wharton and Baron 1989) </li></ul><ul><li>Workplace culture (Budig 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Supervisor (Banerjee 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Coworkers’ support (Banerjee 2009) </li></ul>SO… Previous Literature: Gender, Work and Occupation (3/4)
  6. 6. This empirical literature does not examine the impacts of workplace benefits and policies on the job satisfaction of the workers . Therefore I ask... Previous Literature: Gender, Work and Occupation (4/4)
  7. 7. Research Questions <ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between female and male workers? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between white and non-white workers? and </li></ul><ul><li>What are the impacts of workplace benefits on the job satisfaction of the workers?  </li></ul>
  8. 8. Data: National Study of Changing Workforce 2002 <ul><li>Sample: Nationally representative across all workers of USA </li></ul><ul><li>This study: Dataset restricted to “salaried workers” only </li></ul><ul><li>Salaried workers: n=2,796 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Women workers: n=1,361 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Men workers: n=1,435 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-white workers: n=578 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>White workers: n=2,183 </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Measurement <ul><li>Dependent var: Job satisfaction, 4 items ( α = 0.81) </li></ul><ul><li>Independent var: Workplace benefits and policies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace benefits: 5 items ( α = 0.81) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace autonomy: 4 items ( α = 0.76) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Child care policies: 5 items ( α = 0.88) </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Methods: quantitative analyses <ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between female and male workers? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students’ t-test (Wharton and Baron 1989) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Is there any difference in job-satisfaction between white and non-white workers? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students’ t-test (Wharton and Baron 1989) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What are the impacts of workplace benefits on the job satisfaction of the workers? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression (Wharton and Baron 1989) </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Results: RQ1 and RQ2 <ul><li>Job satisfaction was significantly higher among women workers compared to men workers (p<0.01) </li></ul><ul><li>Job satisfaction was significantly higher among non-white workers compared to white workers (p<0.01) </li></ul>
  12. 12. OLS regression. Dependent variable: Job satisfaction Results: RQ3 Model 1 Model 2 Gender (Women) + p<0.001 + p<0.01 Race (Non-white) + p<0.001 + p<0.001 Benefits + p<0.01 Autonomy + p<0.001 CC policies NS
  13. 13. OLS regression. Dependent variable: Job satisfaction Results: RQ3 Model 3 Gender (Women) + p<0.01 Race (Non-white) + p<0.001 Benefits + p<0.01 Autonomy + p<0.001 CC policies NS Supportive supervisor + p<0.01 Supportive coworker + p<0.001 Being a supervisor + p<0.01 Work-family conflict - p<0.01 Job demands - p<0.01 Work experience + p<0.01 Education + p<0.001 Model 3 Work hours + p<0.001 Occupation (managerial) + p<0.01 Gender of supervisor NS Sex segregation NS Racial/ethnic segregation NS Industry (service) NS Employer type (gov’t) NS
  14. 14. Conclusions <ul><li>This study suggests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Job satisfaction is an important element of workers’ well-being </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gender and Race have significant impacts on job satisfaction of the workers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace benefits are important predictors of workers’ job satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace autonomy is also an important predictor of workers’ job satisfaction </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Implications in General <ul><li>From the literature, these factors are significant predictors of workers’ job satisfaction: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Income </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promotional opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work-family spillover </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inter-group relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workplace culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supervisor’s support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coworkers’ support </li></ul></ul><ul><li>BUT based on my study, policy makers should also try to improve workplace benefits and enhance the autonomy of workers in order to increase their job satisfaction. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Implications for STEM Academia in Particular <ul><li>Academic jobs might differ than many jobs in the database of this research: </li></ul><ul><li>More job control </li></ul><ul><li>Less supervisory oversight </li></ul><ul><li>Less training to supervise employees </li></ul><ul><li>More homogeneously gendered and raced groups of employees </li></ul><ul><li>Clear promotional opportunities until full professor </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges regarding work-family spillover </li></ul>
  17. 17. Discussion Connecting the thought to ADVANCE research………………………………
  18. 18. Questions? Thank you for your time and attention! Dina Banerjee [email_address]

×