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  • e-Portfolio (15%) 1. Description: Students will develop an e-portfolio that encompasses their research work throughout the semester. This includes selecting and assembling artifacts, write-ups, collection and reflection of articles, reflection on research related tasks etc. This is an ongoing task, to be started early in the semester and completed at semester end. 2. Content: 2.1 2.2 2.3 i. ii. iii. Instructor assigned task Written work for Integrative Literature Review. (refer Appendix A) Research Proposal Chapter One (about 10 pages) Chapter Two (about 20 pages) Chapter Three (about 10 pages) 3. Example: http://edu702portfolio.blogspot.com/2010/05/my-research-proposal.html
  • Appendix A Source: Kor,LK & Teoh, SH (2009). From literature review to developing a conceptual framework and to journal writing. Shah Alam: McGrawHill: Pg 34-37 An Integrative Literature Review Page References Quotes/excerpt 73 Cohen, E.G., Brody, C.M., & Sapon-Shevin, M. (2004). Teaching cooperative learning: The challenge for teacher education. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. 74 Cohen, E.G., Brody, C.M., & Sapon-Shevin, M. (2004). Teaching cooperative learning: The challenge for teacher education. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. When using cooperative learning within the classroom, implementation problems may occur. From our work with teacher candidates and graduates, we have identified issues for the teacher candidate as well as for the firstyear teacher. For the teacher candidate, the beginning challenge is to develop the knowledge base in cooperative learning that is necessary for success. The stronger the pedagogical foundation, the higher the confidence the teacher candidate has in these strategies... … Because of lack of experience, they encounter challenges in handling student behaviour issues. For example, how to handle the increase in noise level, how to avoid domination by certain students, how to keep students on task, and how to monitor the teams effectively are tasks that put pressure on the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates lament that the classroom students “think they are broken into play teams when they go into groups”, “talk too much about topics off the subject”, and “do not follow the established rules”. As a result, they sometimes resort to the traditional teacher/lecturer format to manage behaviour more efficiently since direct supervision is often easier for the beginner. Both the teacher candidates and the first-year teachers combat a challenge when the administration of a school does not support cooperative learning. Some principals expect a “quiet” Notes (summary/paraphrase/quot ation)
  • classroom and expect the teachers to be always “teaching” for learning to occur. Also, in implementing cooperative learning, both sometimes encounter conflicts generated by the accountability movement. The great emphasis on standardized tests and the scores themselves push teachers into a constant test preparation mode, which often translates into traditional teacher-dominated classes and a neglect of cooperative learning. 110 Clark,F. P, Ronald J. N., Darcia, A.L. & Thomas, C. H (2008). Moral education: A handbook, (Vol 1, A-L). Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood Publishing Group. Cooperative learning is often construed as students simply working together in the classroom. However, cooperative learning is much more than this. A more informed, complete definition of cooperative learning is: a family of instructional practices in which the teacher organizes students in a systematic manner to work in groups to learn and master material. 360 Morell, L., Buxeda, R., Orengo, M., & Sanchez, A. (2001). After so much effort: Is faculty using cooperative learning in the classroom? Journal of Engineering Education, 357– 362. The survey indicated the sources of faculty members’ exposure to CL. Sixty-two percent (62%) of the faculty had learned about CL through formal courses, workshops and conferences, 36% had learned through self-education. 6 Hicks, R.E., & Leicester, A. (1995). Developing teamwork skills inside and outside the classroom (Monograph). Humanities & Social Sciences, No. 1. Retrieved June , 15, 2009, from http://epublication s.bond.edu.au/hs s pubs/222 … Typical management and organization behaviour information is included in this semester - while there is lecturing to give context to the program students are expected to access and learn the relevant information from their own reading as in any academic program. An extensive reading requirement is central to this semester. Experiential and team approaches are used to consolidate this reading and to build self-awareness and enable practice of essential skills. Emphasis is on self-
  • understanding related to interactions. Page 73 References Cohen, E.G., Brody, C.M., & Sapon-Shevin, M. (2004). Teaching cooperative learning: The challenge for teacher education. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. 74 Cohen, E.G., Brody, C.M., & Sapon-Shevin, M. (2004). Teaching cooperative learning: The challenge for teacher education. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. Quotes When using cooperative learning within the classroom, implementation problems may occur. From our work with teacher candidates and graduates, we have identified issues for the teacher candidate as well as for the firstyear teacher. For the teacher candidate, the beginning challenge is to develop the knowledge base in cooperative learning that is necessary for success. The stronger the pedagogical foundation, the higher the confidence the teacher candidate has in these strategies... … Because of lack of experience, they encounter challenges in handling student behaviour issues. For example, how to handle the increase in noise level, how to avoid domination by certain students, how to keep students on task, and how to monitor the teams effectively are tasks that put pressure on the teacher candidate. Teacher candidates lament that the classroom students “think they are broken into play teams when they go into groups”, “talk too much about topics off the subject”, and “do not follow the established rules”. As a result, they sometimes resort to the traditional teacher/lecturer format to manage behaviour more efficiently since direct supervision is often easier for the beginner. Both the teacher candidates and the first-year teachers combat a challenge when the administration of a school does not support cooperative learning. Some principals expect a “quiet” classroom and expect the teachers to be always “teaching” for learning to occur. Also, in implementing cooperative learning, both sometimes encounter conflicts Notes The successful use of cooperative learning in teaching and learning depends on how the teaching and learning strategy is properly implemented. Teachers must equip themselves with the knowledge about cooperative learning. Teachers who possess a strong pedagogical foundation will have more confidence in conducting cooperative learning. 1 2 Teachers gain knowledge and classroom management skills in the implementation of cooperative learning. Through experience, they learn to keep students on task and manage students’ behaviour more efficiently.
  • generated by the accountability movement. The great emphasis on standardized tests and the scores themselves push teachers into a constant test preparation mode, which often translates into traditional teacher-dominated classes and a neglect of cooperative learning. 110 Clark,F. P, Ronald J. N., Darcia, A.L. & Thomas, C. H (2008). Moral education: A handbook, (Vol 1, A-L). Santa Barbara, California: Greenwood Publishing Group. Cooperative learning is often construed as students simply working together in the classroom. However, cooperative learning is much more than this. A more informed, complete definition of cooperative learning is: a family of instructional practices in which the teacher organizes students in a systematic manner to work in groups to learn and master material. 3 360 Morell, L., Buxeda, R., Orengo, M., & Sanchez, A. (2001). After so much effort: Is faculty using cooperative learning in the classroom? Journal of Engineering Education, 357– 362. The survey indicated the sources of faculty members’ exposure to CL. Sixty-two percent (62%) of the faculty had learned about CL through formal courses, workshops and conferences, 36% had learned through self-education. 4 6 Hicks, R.E., & Leicester, A. (1995). Developing teamwork skills inside and outside the classroom (Monograph). Humanities & Social Sciences, No. 1. Retrieved June , 15, 2009, from http://epublication s.bond.edu.au/hs s pubs/222 … Typical management and organization behaviour information is included in this semester - while there is lecturing to give context to the program students are expected to access and learn the relevant information from their own reading as in any academic program. An extensive reading requirement is central to this semester. Experiential and team approaches are used to consolidate this reading and to build self-awareness and enable practice of essential skills. Emphasis is on selfunderstanding related to interactions. 5 In cooperative learning, teachers are responsible to get students to work in groups and familiarize themselves with learning material. In Morell, Buxeda and Orengo’s (2001) survey, 62% and 36% of faculty educators were exposed to cooperative learning through formal courses and selfeducation or self-learning, respectively. In developing teamwork skills, extensive reading on interaction is required. The reason is to build selfawareness (selfunderstanding) and enable practice of essential skills in teamwork.
  • The notes in Table 3.8 are not organized logically. However, these notes help writers to find a connection between related texts that contributes to a particular subtopic. The following passage is written by sorting the notes indicated by numbers. Notice that the numbers are not sorted according to sequence. Teachers play an important role in guiding students in cooperative learning. Teachers’ exposure to cooperative learning directly influences their ability to guide students who are involved in cooperative learning. Thus, 1the success of using cooperative learning in teaching and learning depends on how the teaching and learning strategy is implemented. Teachers must equip themselves with the knowledge about cooperative learning strategies so that they are confident and strong in pedagogical foundation in conducting cooperative learning (Cohen, Brody, & Sapon-Shevin, 2004). More importantly, 3teachers are responsible to get students to work in groups to learn and familiarize themselves with learning material (Clark,Ronald, Darcia, & Thomas, 2008). 2Teachers gain knowledge and classroom management skills in the implementation of cooperative learning. Through experience, they learn to classroom control, keep students on task and manage students’ behaviour more efficiently. Nevertheless, the “know how” in conducting cooperative learning can be learned through formal courses or workshops as well as through self-education or self-learning. For example, 4 Morell, Buxeda and Orengo’s (2001) survey shows that 62% and 36% of faculty educators get the exposure of cooperative learning through formal courses and self-education or self-learning, respectively. Self-education comes from individual initiatives. 5Hicks and Leicester (1995) noted that in the process of developing teamwork, extensive reading on interaction is required in order to build selfawareness (self-understanding) and enable practice of essential skills in the teamwork.