Constructivist TheoryConstructivism is based on a type of learning inwhich the learner forms, or constructs, much ofwhat h...
Key People/Key PointsJean Piaget (1896-1980)Believed children are constructing new knowledgeas they move through cognitive...
Cognitive Stages Ages (Approximate) Characteristics ofLearningSensorimotor Birth to 2 years Imitation, learn throughsenses...
Jerome Bruner (1915-)States that learning is an active processLearner’s construct new ideas based oncurrent/past knowledge...
Lev Vygotsky (1894-1934)Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD)Refers to what learner can do with helpKids worked better when c...
John Dewey (1859-1952)Teachers should create activities that is concreteand relevant to studentsEducation is a social proc...
Classroom ImplicationsTeachers without technologyAnalyze and studystudentsCreate activities thatbuild upon findingsServe a...
Classroom ImplicationsStudents withouttechnologyCooperate with othersDiscovery learningLearn by doingAnalyze problems andt...
What we thinkWe all actually really like this theory a lot. In a lot ofour classes, the three of us have had professors sa...
CreditsInformation gathered from:Atherton J S (2011) Learning and Teaching;Constructivism in learning [On-line: UK] retrie...
CreditsPictures gathered from:http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/constructivism.htm(ZDP)http://www.nndb.com/peop...
Group 5 Constructivism Learning Theorist PowerPoint
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Group 5 Constructivism Learning Theorist PowerPoint

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Angelo, Katelyn, and Jaclyn
Constructivism

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Group 5 Constructivism Learning Theorist PowerPoint

  1. 1. Constructivist TheoryConstructivism is based on a type of learning inwhich the learner forms, or constructs, much ofwhat he or she learns or comprehends.Cognitive-how the individual learner undsertandthings in terms of developmental stages a ndlearning stylesSocial- how meanings and understandings growout of social encounters
  2. 2. Key People/Key PointsJean Piaget (1896-1980)Believed children are constructing new knowledgeas they move through cognitive stages.Interpret knowledge differently through differentstages.
  3. 3. Cognitive Stages Ages (Approximate) Characteristics ofLearningSensorimotor Birth to 2 years Imitation, learn throughsenses and motoractivities, do notunderstand the worldaround them, andegocentricPreoperational 2 to 6/7 years Egocentric, pretend play,drawing ability, speechand communicationdevelopment, concretethinking, and intuitivereasoningConcrete operational 6/7 years to 11/12 years Classification, logicalreasoning, problemsolving, and beginningsof abstract thinkingFormal operational 11/12 years throughadulthoodComparative reasoning,abstract thinking,deductive logic, and testhypotheses
  4. 4. Jerome Bruner (1915-)States that learning is an active processLearner’s construct new ideas based oncurrent/past knowledgeParticipatory learnersActively engaged in learning process
  5. 5. Lev Vygotsky (1894-1934)Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD)Refers to what learner can do with helpKids worked better when collaborating
  6. 6. John Dewey (1859-1952)Teachers should create activities that is concreteand relevant to studentsEducation is a social processViewed learning as student-directedTeacher is a guideStudents learn by doing
  7. 7. Classroom ImplicationsTeachers without technologyAnalyze and studystudentsCreate activities thatbuild upon findingsServe as guide forresourcesMake education relevantTeachers with technologyUse computers to trackprogressUse teacher resourcewebsites for activitiesFind technologyappropriate for students
  8. 8. Classroom ImplicationsStudents withouttechnologyCooperate with othersDiscovery learningLearn by doingAnalyze problems andthink criticallyStudents withtechnologyUse the internet forresearchElectronic flashcardsUse of digital mediaUse of technology as atool to learn
  9. 9. What we thinkWe all actually really like this theory a lot. In a lot ofour classes, the three of us have had professors saythat this is actually the direction that teaching isheading, where the students lead in the education,and we, as the educators, are there as a guide. Wethink that it’s always interesting to hear what thestudents have to say during discussions and we doagree with this theory that learning by doing is thebest way to go about it. The students not only retainmore information that way, but they also are an activeparticipant in their own education.
  10. 10. CreditsInformation gathered from:Atherton J S (2011) Learning and Teaching;Constructivism in learning [On-line: UK] retrieved 18 April2013 fromhttp://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/constructivism.htmShelly, Gary B., Glenda A. Gunter, and Randolph E. Gunter.Teachers Discovering Computers: Integrating Technologyin a Connected World. Boston, MA: Course TechnologyCengage Learning, 2012. Print.
  11. 11. CreditsPictures gathered from:http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/constructivism.htm(ZDP)http://www.nndb.com/people/359/000094077/ (Jean Piaget)http://dewey.pragmatism.org (John Dewey)http://edtech2.boisestate.edu/flemmerl/EDTECH575/jeromebruner.html (Jerome Bruner)Shelly, Gary B., Glenda A. Gunter, and Randolph E. Gunter.Teachers Discovering Computers: Integrating Technology in aConnected World. Boston, MA: Course Technology CengageLearning, 2012. Print (Cognitive Stages Chart)

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