0
OSC Group 3 Reports<br /><ul><li> Windows XP installation
 Peer to peer connection
 Printer Sharing
 File Sharing
 Net Meeting Configuration</li></li></ul><li>Windows XP Introduction<br /><ul><li> Windows XP is an operating system produ...
 It was first released in August 2001
 It was the most popular versions of </li></ul>Windows, based on installed user based.<br />
Windows XP Introduction<br /><ul><li>The name “XP” is short for eXPerience.
 Windows XP is the successor to both Windows 2000 and Windows ME
 The most common edition were Windows XP Home edition for home users and </li></ul>Windows XP Professional which support<b...
Minimum Hardware Requirements<br /><ul><li> Pentium 233-megahertz (MHz) processor or faster.
 64 Megabytes (MB) of RAM
 1.5 Gigabytes of available space on hard disk
 CD Rom or DVD Rom drive
 Keyboard and mouse and other </li></ul>pointing devices.<br /><ul><li> Video adapter and monitor with at least 800 x 600 ...
 Sound card, speakers and headphones</li></li></ul><li>Pre-installation checklist<br /><ul><li> Prepare your Windows XP in...
 Locate your Windows XP product key.
 Make sure your computer hardware meets the minimum requirements and also verify that your keyboard, mouse, monitors  and ...
Pre-installation checklist<br /><ul><li> Make sure the first boot device is set to CD/DVD Rom in your BIOS setup, verify t...
 If all are ready and set, we can now continue on the Installation process.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><u...
 Insert your Windows XP CD into your computer CD Rom and restart.
 If prompted to boot from the CD, press any key on your keyboard or just press on the spacebar key.
 If you miss the prompt as it only appears</li></ul>in few seconds, restart and try again.<br />
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP Setup begins. During this portion of setup, your mouse will not work, so you...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Let us press ENTER to select Unpartitioned space, which appears by default.</li></li></...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li>Setup will continue to copy files and to install devices: </li></li></ul><li>Installatio...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li>Type a strong password that you can remember in the </li></ul>Administrator password box...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Date and Time Settings page, set your computer’s clock. Then, click the Time Zon...
 When the Monitor Settings dialog </li></ul>box appears, click OK.<br />
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> The final stage of setup begins. On the Welcome to Microsoft Windows page, click Next.<...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> If you use dial-up Internet access, or if Windows XP cannot connect to the Internet, yo...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Ready to register with Microsoft? page, click Yes, and then click Next.</li></li...
Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Thank you! page, click Finish.
 Enjoy and start using your new PC with Windows XP.</li></li></ul><li>
Peer to peer connection<br /><ul><li>  Overview</li></ul>         - There are several ways to connect computers or create ...
Peer to peer connection<br />   - The computers in a workgroup are considered peers because they are all equal and share r...
Peer to peer connection<br />   - A home or small office network is like a telephone system. On a network, each computer h...
Peer to peer connection<br /> - With home or small office networking, you can: <br /><ul><li>  Use one computer to secure ...
 Share one Internet connection with all of the computers on the network.
 Work on files stored on any </li></ul>computer on the network.<br /><ul><li> Share printers with all of the </li></ul> co...
Peer to peer connection<br /> - The typical computing model for many applications is a client/server model. A server compu...
Peer to peer connection<br /> - Web servers on the Internet are typically high-end dedicated server computers with very fa...
Peer to peer connection<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking has the following advantages over client/server networking:<br />1...
Peer to peer connection<br />3. A network of peers can share its processor, consolidating computing resources for distribu...
Peer to peer connection<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking solves the following problems: <br />      1. Allows the processin...
Peer to peer networking scenarios<br />  - Peer-to-peer networking enables or enhances the following scenarios:<br />     ...
Real-Time Communications<br />  - For RTC, peer-to-peer networking enables server less instant messaging and real-time mat...
Real-Time Communications<br />    2. Real-time matchmaking and game play: <br />            Similar to RTC, real-time game...
Real-Time Communications<br />          These sites track and provide the statistics to help in the process. However, thes...
Collaboration<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows the sharing of a workspace, files, and experiences. <br />     1. Pro...
Collaboration<br />     2. Sharing your files with other people:<br />            A subset of project workspace sharing is...
Content Distribution<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows the distribution of text, audio, and video and software produc...
Distributed Processing<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows computing tasks to be distributed and processor resources to...
Improved Internet Technologies<br />Peer-to-peer networking can also provide an improved utilization of the Internet and s...
Example of Peer to Peer connection w/o central infrastructure<br />
Peer to Peer connection using X graph<br />
Peer to peer in Windows XP<br /><ul><li> To enable peer to peer networking in Windows XP with SP2 , do the following :</li...
Set-up peer network in Windows XP<br /><ul><li> Your network can connect up to six workstation in a workgroup, but here in...
Hardware – Network Cable<br /><ul><li> One network cable per computer. Use CAT5 UTP or STP cables (category 5 unshielded o...
Decide whether to use hub or switch<br /><ul><li> A hub and a switch differ. When a hub receives a data packet, it forward...
A hub forwards data packets to all the ports<br /><ul><li> -</li></li></ul><li>Switch forwards data packet only to recepie...
Switch forwards data packet only to recipients<br /><ul><li> A switch is more intelligent. It recognizes which computer is...
Connecting the Computers<br /><ul><li> Install the signal distributor. Put it near a power outlet and where all the comput...
Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> Locate a folder on the computer.
 Right-click the file that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security to view additional settings.</li></li></...
Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> Specify whether the data that is accessed over the network can be changed, a...
 The icon for the shared folder appears with a picture of a hand.
 To access the shared folder, </li></ul>click Start, click My Computer, <br />and then click <br />My Network Places.<br />
Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> When you open My computer, the shared resources for all the computers in you...
Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> If you click Allow network users to change my files, you can view, copy, mov...
Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> You can use the same method to share whole drives, including the following: ...
Printer Sharing<br /><ul><li>  Click Start, click Control Panel, click Printers and Other Hardware, and then click View in...
 If you are using Classic view in </li></ul>Control Panel, double-click <br />Printers and Faxes. <br />
Printer Sharing<br /><ul><li>  Right-click the printer, and then click Sharing.
You can now share the printer.  Click Share this printer, </li></ul>type a share name, and then click OK.<br /><ul><li> Th...
  In the RUN window type CONF and press Enter</li></ul>       This will launch the Net Meeting program setup<br /><ul><li>...
  Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li>  Confirm that the Server name is : Microsoft Intern...
  Place Check</li></ul>on “Do not list..”<br /><ul><li>  Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><...
 Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li>  Place check mark on the first option
  Remove the check mark on the second option
  Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li>  Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configura...
  Select Unblock</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li>  Congratulations, you have setup </li></ul>Net ...
 Click on the Telephone icon to</li></ul>Begin the call<br /><ul><li> To end the call Click on the </li></ul>Receiver.<br />
Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li>  GUI – Graphical User Interface
  Ad hoc networking – means “for or concerned with one specific purpose”. In networking, the computer to computer direct n...
 NAT  - Network Address Translation is a process of  modifying network address information in datagram ( IP ) packet heade...
Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li>  IP – Internet Protocol is the principal communications protocol used for relaying ...
 IPV4 – Internet Protocol Version 4 is the first major version of IP.
 IPV6 – Internet Protocol Version 6 is the successor of IPV4 and is in active growing </li></ul>Deployment worldwide.<br />
Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li>  Peer to peer – is an approach to computer networking where all computers share equ...
 LAN – Local Area Network</li></li></ul><li>
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Operating System Concepts : Reports
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Operating System Concepts : Reports

1,301

Published on

This presentation is part of our reports in our Operating System Concepts subject. Included in the presentation are topics about Installing Windows XP, Peer to peer networking, File Sharing, Printer Sharing and Net meeting configuration.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,301
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
40
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Group 3 Reports for Operating System Concepts : ICT-TR2A1
  • Transcript of "Operating System Concepts : Reports"

    1. 1. OSC Group 3 Reports<br /><ul><li> Windows XP installation
    2. 2. Peer to peer connection
    3. 3. Printer Sharing
    4. 4. File Sharing
    5. 5. Net Meeting Configuration</li></li></ul><li>Windows XP Introduction<br /><ul><li> Windows XP is an operating system produce by Microsoft for use on personal computers, including home and business desktops, laptops and media center.
    6. 6. It was first released in August 2001
    7. 7. It was the most popular versions of </li></ul>Windows, based on installed user based.<br />
    8. 8. Windows XP Introduction<br /><ul><li>The name “XP” is short for eXPerience.
    9. 9. Windows XP is the successor to both Windows 2000 and Windows ME
    10. 10. The most common edition were Windows XP Home edition for home users and </li></ul>Windows XP Professional which support<br />Windows server domain and two <br />physical processors.<br />
    11. 11. Minimum Hardware Requirements<br /><ul><li> Pentium 233-megahertz (MHz) processor or faster.
    12. 12. 64 Megabytes (MB) of RAM
    13. 13. 1.5 Gigabytes of available space on hard disk
    14. 14. CD Rom or DVD Rom drive
    15. 15. Keyboard and mouse and other </li></ul>pointing devices.<br /><ul><li> Video adapter and monitor with at least 800 x 600 screen resolution.
    16. 16. Sound card, speakers and headphones</li></li></ul><li>Pre-installation checklist<br /><ul><li> Prepare your Windows XP installation CD.
    17. 17. Locate your Windows XP product key.
    18. 18. Make sure your computer hardware meets the minimum requirements and also verify that your keyboard, mouse, monitors and CD drive are properly connected.</li></li></ul><li>Pre-installation checklist<br /><ul><li> Prepare your computer hardware drivers if it is available.</li></ul> - Drivers are software that Windows XP use to communicate with your computer’s hardware, most new computers include a CD containing drivers from the hardware manufacturers. <br /> - If you do not have drivers, Windows XP may already include drivers for your hardware but if not you need to download it from your hardware manufacturers website.<br />
    19. 19. Pre-installation checklist<br /><ul><li> Make sure the first boot device is set to CD/DVD Rom in your BIOS setup, verify this by pressing Del or F2 during POST ( Power on self test ).
    20. 20. If all are ready and set, we can now continue on the Installation process.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Power on your PC
    21. 21. Insert your Windows XP CD into your computer CD Rom and restart.
    22. 22. If prompted to boot from the CD, press any key on your keyboard or just press on the spacebar key.
    23. 23. If you miss the prompt as it only appears</li></ul>in few seconds, restart and try again.<br />
    24. 24. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP Setup begins. During this portion of setup, your mouse will not work, so you must use the keyboard. On the Welcome to Setup page, press ENTER.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Windows XP Licensing Agreement page, read the licensing agreement. Press the PAGE DOWN key to scroll to the bottom of the agreement. Then press F8.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Select the hard disk drive on which Windows XP will be installed. Please note that all data on the selected hard disk drive will be removed and cannot be recovered after this step. </li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> We can select from the 3 options prompted by the installation CD.</li></ul> 1. To setup Windows XP on the selected item, press ENTER.<br /> 2. To create a partition in the unpartitioned space, press C<br /> 3. To deleted the selected<br />partition press D. <br />
    25. 25. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Let us press ENTER to select Unpartitioned space, which appears by default.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Press ENTER again to select Format the partition using the NTFS file system, which also appears by default.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP erases your hard disk drive using a process called formatting and then copies the setup files. You can leave your computer, drink a coffee or soft drinks or else go on and wait for 20 to 30 minutes.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Copying of Windows XP files under process….</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP installation will reboot after the copying of files….</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> During boot Windows XP will again prompt you to “Press any key…”. Make sure not to press any key, this time you just need to</li></ul>ignore that.<br />Set up will <br />Continue and<br />it will starts<br />with a GUI.<br />
    26. 26. Installation Process<br /><ul><li>Setup will continue to copy files and to install devices: </li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Again better drink coffee or soft drinks as this will take about a half an hour: </li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> From the restart point forward, we can use the mouse. Eventually, the Regional and Language Options page appears. Click Next to accept the default settings or prefer a language other than English, we can also change language settings after setup is complete.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Personalize Your Software page, type your name and your organization name. Some programs use this information to automatically fill in your name when required. Then, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Your Product Key page, type your product key as it appears on your Windows XP CD case. The product key is unique for every Windows XP installation. Then, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Computer Name and Administrator Password page, in the Computer name box, type a name that uniquely identifies your computer in your house, such as FAMILYROOM. </li></ul>You cannot use spaces<br />or punctuation. If you <br />connect your <br />computer to a <br />network, you will use <br />this computer name<br />to find shared files <br />and printers. <br />
    27. 27. Installation Process<br /><ul><li>Type a strong password that you can remember in the </li></ul>Administrator password box, and then retype it in the <br />Confirm password box. Click Next. <br />
    28. 28. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Date and Time Settings page, set your computer’s clock. Then, click the Time Zone down arrow, and select your time zone. Click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP will spend about a minute configuring your computer. On the Networking Settings page, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Workgroup or Computer Domain page, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP will spend 20 or 30 minutes configuring your computer and will automatically restart when finished. When the Display Settings dialog appears, click OK.
    29. 29. When the Monitor Settings dialog </li></ul>box appears, click OK.<br />
    30. 30. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> The final stage of setup begins. On the Welcome to Microsoft Windows page, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Help protect your PC page, click Help protect my PC by turning on Automatic Updates now. Then, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP will then check if you are connected to the Internet: If you are connected to the Internet, select the choice that describes your network connection on the Will this computer connect to the Internet directly, or through a network? page.</li></ul> If you’re not sure, accept <br />the default selection, and <br />click Next.<br />
    31. 31. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> If you use dial-up Internet access, or if Windows XP cannot connect to the Internet, you can connect to the Internet after setup is complete. On the How will this computer connect to the Internet? page, click Skip.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> Windows XP Setup displays the Ready to activate Windows? page. If you are connected to the Internet, click Yes, and then click Next. If you are not yet connected to the Internet, click No. After setup is complete, </li></ul>Windows XP will <br />automatically remind you <br />to activate and register <br />your copy of Windows XP.<br />
    32. 32. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Ready to register with Microsoft? page, click Yes, and then click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Collecting Registration Information page, complete the form. Then, click Next.</li></li></ul><li>Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Who will use this computer? page, type the name of each person who will use the computer. You can use first names only, nicknames, or full names. Then click Next. To add users after setup is complete or to specify a </li></ul>password to keep <br />your account Private.<br />
    33. 33. Installation Process<br /><ul><li> On the Thank you! page, click Finish.
    34. 34. Enjoy and start using your new PC with Windows XP.</li></li></ul><li>
    35. 35. Peer to peer connection<br /><ul><li> Overview</li></ul> - There are several ways to connect computers or create a network. For a home or small office, the most common model is peer-to-peer networking.<br /> - In a peer-to-peer network, also called a workgroup, computers directly communicate with each other and do not require a server to manage <br />network resources. A peer-to-peer <br />network is most appropriate when fewer than <br />ten computers are located in the same general area. <br />
    36. 36. Peer to peer connection<br /> - The computers in a workgroup are considered peers because they are all equal and share resources among each other. <br /> - Each user decides which data on his or her computer will be shared with the network. By sharing common resources, users can print from a <br />single printer, access information <br />in shared folders, and work on a <br />single file without transferring it <br />to a floppy disk.<br />
    37. 37. Peer to peer connection<br /> - A home or small office network is like a telephone system. On a network, each computer has a network adapter that acts like a phone handset: just as you use a handset for talking and listening, the computer uses the network device to send and receive information to and from other computers on the network. <br />
    38. 38. Peer to peer connection<br /> - With home or small office networking, you can: <br /><ul><li> Use one computer to secure your entire network and protect your Internet connection.
    39. 39. Share one Internet connection with all of the computers on the network.
    40. 40. Work on files stored on any </li></ul>computer on the network.<br /><ul><li> Share printers with all of the </li></ul> computers on the network. <br /><ul><li> Play multiplayer games. </li></li></ul><li>Peer to peer connection<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking is the utilization of the relatively powerful personal computers that exist at the edge of the Internet for more than just client-based computing tasks. The modern PC has a very fast processor, vast memory, and a large hard disk, none of which are being fully utilized when performing<br />common computing tasks such as<br />e-mail and Web browsing. <br />The modern PC can easily act as both <br />a client and server (a peer) for many types of applications.<br />
    41. 41. Peer to peer connection<br /> - The typical computing model for many applications is a client/server model. A server computer typically has vast resources and responds to requests for resources and data from client computers. Client computers initiate requests for resources or data from server computers.<br /> A good example of the client/server <br />model of computing is Web browsing.<br />
    42. 42. Peer to peer connection<br /> - Web servers on the Internet are typically high-end dedicated server computers with very fast processors (or multiple processors) and huge hard disk arrays. The Web server stores all of the content associated with a Web site (HTML files, graphics, audio and video files, etc.) and listens for incoming requests to view <br />the information on a particular Web page.<br />When a page is requested, the Web <br />server sends the page and its associated files <br />to the requesting client.<br />
    43. 43. Peer to peer connection<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking has the following advantages over client/server networking:<br />1. Content and resources can be shared from both the center and the edge of the network. In client/server networking, content and resources are typically shared from only the center of the network.<br />2. A network of peers is easily<br />scaled and more reliable than a <br />single server. A single server is <br />subject to a single point of failure or can be a <br />bottleneck in times of high network utilization.<br />
    44. 44. Peer to peer connection<br />3. A network of peers can share its processor, consolidating computing resources for distributed computing tasks, rather than relying on a single computer, such as a supercomputer.<br />4. Shared resources of peer computers can be directly accessed. Rather than sharing a file stored on a central server, a peer can share the file <br />directly from its local storage.<br />
    45. 45. Peer to peer connection<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking solves the following problems: <br /> 1. Allows the processing resources of edge computers to be utilized for distributed computing tasks.<br /> 2. Allows local resources to be shared directly, without the need for intermediate servers.<br /> 3. Allows efficient multipoint <br />communication without having to <br />rely on IP multicast infrastructure.<br />
    46. 46. Peer to peer networking scenarios<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking enables or enhances the following scenarios:<br /> 1. Real-time communications (RTC).<br /> 2. Collaboration<br /> 3. Content distribution<br /> 4. Distributed processing<br /> 5. Improved Internet technologies<br />
    47. 47. Real-Time Communications<br /> - For RTC, peer-to-peer networking enables server less instant messaging and real-time matchmaking and game play.<br /> 1. Server less instant messaging : <br />Computer users can chat and have voice or video conversations with their peers today. However, many of the existing programs and their communications protocols rely on servers to function. <br />If you are participating in an ad-hoc <br />wireless network or are a part of an isolated network, you are unable to use these RTC facilities. Peer-to-peer technology allows the extension of RTC technologies to these additional networking environments.<br />
    48. 48. Real-Time Communications<br /> 2. Real-time matchmaking and game play: <br /> Similar to RTC, real-time game play exists today. There are many Web-based game sites that cater to the gaming community via the Internet. <br /> They offer the ability to find other gamers with similar interests and play a game together. <br />The problem is that the game sites <br />exist only on the Internet and are geared <br />toward the avid gamer who wants to play against the best gamers in the world. <br />
    49. 49. Real-Time Communications<br /> These sites track and provide the statistics to help in the process. However, these sites do not allow a gamer to set up an ad-hoc game among friends in a variety of networking environments. Peer-to-peer networking can provide this capability.<br />
    50. 50. Collaboration<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows the sharing of a workspace, files, and experiences. <br /> 1. Project workspaces solving a goal:<br /> Shared workspace applications allow for the creation of ad-hoc workgroups and then allow the workgroup owners to populate the <br />shared workspace with the tools <br />and content that will allow the group <br />to solve a problem. This could include <br />message boards, productivity tools, and files.<br />
    51. 51. Collaboration<br /> 2. Sharing your files with other people:<br /> A subset of project workspace sharing is the ability to share files. Although this ability exists today with the current version of Windows, it can be enhanced through peer-to-peer networking to make file content available in an easy and friendly way. Allowing easy access to the incredible wealth of content at the <br />edge of the Internet or in ad-hoc <br />computing environments increases the <br />value of network computing.<br />
    52. 52. Content Distribution<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows the distribution of text, audio, and video and software product updates.<br />
    53. 53. Distributed Processing<br /> - Peer-to-peer networking allows computing tasks to be distributed and processor resources to be aggregated.<br /> A large computing task can first be divided into separate smaller computing tasks well suited to the computing resources of a peer. A peer could do the dividing of the large computing task. Then, peer-to-peer networking <br />can distribute the individual tasks to <br />the separate peers in the group. <br />Each peer performs its computing task <br />and reports its result back to a <br />centralized accumulation point. <br />
    54. 54. Improved Internet Technologies<br />Peer-to-peer networking can also provide an improved utilization of the Internet and support new Internet technologies. Historically, the Internet was designed so that network peers can have end-to-end connectivity. The modern-day Internet, however, more closely resembles a client/server environment where communication in many cases is not end-to-end due to the <br />prevalence of Network Address <br />Translators (NATs).<br />
    55. 55. Example of Peer to Peer connection w/o central infrastructure<br />
    56. 56. Peer to Peer connection using X graph<br />
    57. 57. Peer to peer in Windows XP<br /><ul><li> To enable peer to peer networking in Windows XP with SP2 , do the following :</li></ul> - Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click on Add and Remove Programs.<br /> - Click Add / Remove Windows components.<br /> - In Components, click Networking Services (but do not select its checkbox), then click on<br />Details<br />- Select the Peer-to-Peer check box, and then click ok.<br /> - Click next and then follow the instructions in the wizard.<br />
    58. 58. Set-up peer network in Windows XP<br /><ul><li> Your network can connect up to six workstation in a workgroup, but here in our example we were just using 4. In a peer to peer network all the computers share their resources. Every computer can take over server functions and use the workgroup resources at the same time.</li></li></ul><li>Hardware – Network Card<br /> We need one network card per computer, example shown is a LAN board.<br />
    59. 59. Hardware – Network Cable<br /><ul><li> One network cable per computer. Use CAT5 UTP or STP cables (category 5 unshielded or shielded twisted pair cables with RJ45 connectors on both ends).</li></li></ul><li>Hardware – Signal Distributor<br /><ul><li> A signal distributor connects computers with each other, controls data flow and can negotiate data transfer between 10 Mbit/s and 100 Mbit/s connections. For your small network, use either a dual-speed hub or a dual-speed switch .</li></li></ul><li>Decide whether to use hub or switch<br /><ul><li> The signal distributor is the central component that connects your network. The twisted pair cable connects the network cards in all the computers to the signal distributor. This forms a star structure. The term "star topology" originates from this star </li></ul>structure. The signal distributor does <br />not just connect the devices. It also <br />guides data packets through the network. <br />
    60. 60. Decide whether to use hub or switch<br /><ul><li> A hub and a switch differ. When a hub receives a data packet, it forwards it to all other computers. Each computer must verify whether it is the correct recipient. signal distributor connects computers with each other, controls data flow and can negotiate data transfer between 10 Mbit/s and 100 Mbit/s connections. </li></ul>For your small network, use either <br />a dual-speed hub or a dual-speed <br />switch .<br />
    61. 61. A hub forwards data packets to all the ports<br /><ul><li> -</li></li></ul><li>Switch forwards data packet only to recepients<br /><ul><li> A switch is more intelligent. It recognizes which computer is connected to which port based on the MAC address (the network card's hardware address assigned by the manufacturer) and saves this information in a table. When a switch receives a data packet, </li></ul>it determines the recipient and <br />forwards the packet to the correct <br />computer.<br />
    62. 62. Switch forwards data packet only to recipients<br /><ul><li> A switch is more intelligent. It recognizes which computer is connected to which port based on the MAC address (the network card's hardware address assigned by the manufacturer) and saves this information in a table. When a switch receives a data</li></ul>packet, it determines the <br />recipient and forwards the <br />packet to the correct<br />computer.<br />
    63. 63. Connecting the Computers<br /><ul><li> Install the signal distributor. Put it near a power outlet and where all the computers can easily access it. Follow these steps: </li></ul> - Plug one end of the twisted pair cable into a network card and the other end into the hub or switch.<br /><ul><li> Plug the signal distributor into </li></ul>a power outlet.<br />
    64. 64. Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> Locate a folder on the computer.
    65. 65. Right-click the file that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security to view additional settings.</li></li></ul><li>Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> The next two windows only appear when you are setting up your first shared item. Windows notifies you that sharing data presents a certain security risk. Therefore, remote access is turned off by default. Click the Security warning message, click Just enable file sharing, and then click OK.</li></li></ul><li>Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> - </li></li></ul><li>Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> Now you can share data. Click Share this folder on the network, and then type a share name. You can use this name later to access the data. </li></ul>The share name and the folder<br />name do not have to be the <br />same.<br />
    66. 66. Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> Specify whether the data that is accessed over the network can be changed, and then click OK.
    67. 67. The icon for the shared folder appears with a picture of a hand.
    68. 68. To access the shared folder, </li></ul>click Start, click My Computer, <br />and then click <br />My Network Places.<br />
    69. 69. Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> When you open My computer, the shared resources for all the computers in your small network are listed next to each other. You can find the required folder under Share_name on Computer_name.</li></li></ul><li>Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> If you work your way down to a specific computer in the network, you will see only the shared resources on this one computer. Click View workgroup computers, double-click the computer names </li></ul>(either as Computer_name or <br />as Computer_description <br />[Computer name]), and then <br />search for the name of <br />the shared file.<br />
    70. 70. Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> If you click Allow network users to change my files, you can view, copy, move, change and delete files in this folder on any computer in this network. </li></ul>You can add new files and <br />access subfolders and files.<br />
    71. 71. Sharing folders in peer network<br /><ul><li> You can use the same method to share whole drives, including the following: </li></ul> - Hard disks or partitions<br /> - CD ROM drives<br /> - ZIP drives<br />
    72. 72.
    73. 73. Printer Sharing<br /><ul><li> Click Start, click Control Panel, click Printers and Other Hardware, and then click View installed printers or fax printers.
    74. 74. If you are using Classic view in </li></ul>Control Panel, double-click <br />Printers and Faxes. <br />
    75. 75. Printer Sharing<br /><ul><li> Right-click the printer, and then click Sharing.
    76. 76. You can now share the printer. Click Share this printer, </li></ul>type a share name, and then click OK.<br /><ul><li> The printer is now shared.</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Click on Start menu and click RUN
    77. 77. In the RUN window type CONF and press Enter</li></ul> This will launch the Net Meeting program setup<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Enter the required field which is First name, Last name and Email address
    78. 78. Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Confirm that the Server name is : Microsoft Internet Directory
    79. 79. Place Check</li></ul>on “Do not list..”<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Select Cable, DSL, ISDN
    80. 80. Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Place check mark on the first option
    81. 81. Remove the check mark on the second option
    82. 82. Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Press Next</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Press Next(finish)</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Once you select Finish, a security alert will appear
    83. 83. Select Unblock</li></li></ul><li>Net Meeting Configuration<br /><ul><li> Congratulations, you have setup </li></ul>Net Meeting and now you can <br />start dialing in!<br /><ul><li> To begin double click on the Net </li></ul>Meeting icon.<br /><ul><li> Type in the IP Address
    84. 84. Click on the Telephone icon to</li></ul>Begin the call<br /><ul><li> To end the call Click on the </li></ul>Receiver.<br />
    85. 85.
    86. 86. Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li> GUI – Graphical User Interface
    87. 87. Ad hoc networking – means “for or concerned with one specific purpose”. In networking, the computer to computer direct networking is called ad hoc.
    88. 88. NAT - Network Address Translation is a process of modifying network address information in datagram ( IP ) packet headers while in transit across</li></ul>a traffic routing device for the purpose of re-mapping one IP address space into another.<br />
    89. 89. Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li> IP – Internet Protocol is the principal communications protocol used for relaying datagram's (packets) across an internetwork using the internet protocol suite.
    90. 90. IPV4 – Internet Protocol Version 4 is the first major version of IP.
    91. 91. IPV6 – Internet Protocol Version 6 is the successor of IPV4 and is in active growing </li></ul>Deployment worldwide.<br />
    92. 92. Terminology and meanings<br /><ul><li> Peer to peer – is an approach to computer networking where all computers share equivalent responsibility for processing data. It is also known as peer networking and it differs from client / server networking where certain devices have responsibility to provide or serving data and other device consume or otherwise act as clients of those server.
    93. 93. LAN – Local Area Network</li></li></ul><li>
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×