Linguistic Devices

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  • Great stuff. Brilliantly to the point, aside from the font used and that the pencils on the bottom left obfuscate any text there, I'm dyslexis and would really appreciate it if these changes were enacted. Thanks.
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  • thank you this will help in my exam
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  • Really helped. Linguistic devices make more sense and I now know how to evaluate the effects of each one has on a reader.

    Once again thanks.
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Linguistic Devices

  1. 1. Linguistic Devices English Paper 1, Section A Reading Non-fiction and Media Texts
  2. 2. Evaluating Language <ul><li>Writers match the language they use to their audience and purpose </li></ul><ul><li>The type of language used in a text affects the way the reader receives the message </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating the language of a text means explaining the impact that the language has on the reader </li></ul>
  3. 3. Dramatic or emotive language <ul><li>Dramatic language is used to attract the reader’s attention, especially in newspaper headlines </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Hospitals face crisis over fall in blood supplies </li></ul><ul><li>Emotive language is intended to arouse strong feelings </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. undesirable characters can prey on vulnerable children </li></ul>
  4. 4. Imperatives <ul><li>Imperatives are words (verbs) that give us instructions or orders – they usually appear at the start of a sentence </li></ul><ul><li>They are used to appeal directly to the reader and to make the message very clear </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Discover your favourite days out in Bedford </li></ul>
  5. 5. Alliteration <ul><li>This is where writers use the same letter to start several words – seen in headlines and advertising slogans </li></ul><ul><li>It is a common way of catching the reader’s attention </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Runway rumpus at airport </li></ul><ul><li>p p p pick up a penguin </li></ul>
  6. 6. Rhetorical questions <ul><li>Questions are used by writers to get the reader involved directly </li></ul><ul><li>Rhetorical questions do not expect an answer – they are a persuasive technique to make the reader agree with the writer’s point of view </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Would you like to be healthier and live longer? </li></ul>
  7. 7. Lists <ul><li>Lists, especially lists of three, are a persuasive device that writers use to suggest they have extensive evidence to support their views </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Animal testing is unreliable, unnecessary and cruel </li></ul>
  8. 8. Colloquial language <ul><li>Colloquial language is informal. It is the language of everyday conversation and is used to make it easy for readers to relate to the text </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. Staying out late? Give your folks a call! </li></ul>
  9. 9. Final thoughts <ul><li>The ability to evaluate the language choices of writers could mean the difference between an E grade and a C+ grade </li></ul><ul><li>If you choose (which I hope you don’t!) to revise only one thing before the exam – MAKE IT THIS!!! </li></ul>

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