VALS

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Detailed description of VALS model with description and illustrative examples for each segment. VALS,Innovators,Thinkers,Believers,Achievers,Strivers,Experiencers,Makers,Survivors

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VALS

  1. 1. By: Vikram Dahiya & Renju Jose
  2. 2. Model of Buyer BehaviorMarketing and Buyer’s Black Box Buyer ResponsesOther StimuliMarketing Buyer Characteristics Product ChoiceProduct Buyer Decision Process Brand ChoicePrice Dealer ChoicePlacePromotionOther Purchase TimingEconomic Purchase AmountTechnologicalPoliticalCultural
  3. 3. Values, Attitudes and Life-Styles (VALS) Innovators Innovators High InnovationHigh Resources Thinkers Thinkers Achievers Achievers Experiencers Experiencers Believers Believers Strivers Strivers Makers Makers Survivors Survivors Low Resources Low Innovation
  4. 4. The main dimensions of the VALSframework are:Primary motivation (the horizontal dimension)Resources (the vertical dimension).The vertical dimension segments people based on thedegree to which they are innovative and have resourcessuch as income, education, self-confidence, intelligence,leadership skills, and energy.
  5. 5. VALS Framework and Segments Innovators Thinkers Believers Achievers Strivers Experiencers Makers Survivors
  6. 6. Innovators Innovators are successful, sophisticated, take-charge people with high self-esteem. Because they have such abundant resources, they exhibit all three primary motivations in varying degrees. They are change leaders and are the most receptive to new ideas and technologies. Innovators are very active consumers, and their purchases reflect cultivated tastes for upscale, niche products and services. Image is important to Innovators, not as evidence of status or power but as an expression of their taste, independence, and personality. Their lives are characterized by variety. Their possessions and recreation reflect a cultivated taste for the finer things in life.
  7. 7. Innovator BuysBMWLuxury WatchesAlien ware
  8. 8. Thinkers• These consumers are the high-resource group of those who are motivated by ideals. They are mature, responsible, well-educated professionals.• Their leisure activities center on their homes, but they are well informed about what goes on in the world and are open to new ideas and social change.• They have high incomes but are practical consumers and rational decision makers.
  9. 9. • Thinkers are motivated by ideals. They are mature, satisfied, comfortable, and reflective people who value order, knowledge, and responsibility.• They tend to be well educated and actively seek out information in the decision-making process. They are well informed about world and national events and are alert to opportunities to broaden their knowledge.• They have a moderate respect for the status-quo institutions of authority and social decorum, but are open to consider new ideas. Although their incomes allow them many choices, Thinkers are conservative, practical consumers; they look for durability and functionality.
  10. 10. Thinker BuysBranded ShoesRenowned Books
  11. 11. BelieversLike Thinkers, Believers are motivated by ideals.•They are conservative, conventional people withconcrete beliefs based on traditional, established codes:family, religion, community and the nation.•They follow established routines, organized in large partaround home, family, community and social or religiousorganizations to which they belong.•As consumers, Believers are predictable; they choosefamiliar products and established brands. They favorAmerican products and are generally loyal customers.
  12. 12. Believer BuysMercuryLocal TV NewsOld and trusted Brands like Bata, Rin etc.
  13. 13. Achievers• Motivated by the desire for achievement, Achievers have goal-oriented lifestyles and a deep commitment to career and family.• Their social lives reflect this focus and are structured around family, their place of worship and work.• Achievers live conventional lives, are politically conservative and respect authority and the status quo.• They value consensus, predictability and stability over risk, intimacy and self-discovery.
  14. 14. Achiever BuysHondaLow-Calorie Domestic Beeri–pad etc.
  15. 15. StriversStrivers are trendy and fun loving. Because they are motivatedby achievement, Strivers are concerned about the opinionsand approval of others. Money defines success for Strivers,who dont have enough of it to meet their desires.Narrow interestsEasily boredSomewhat isolatedLook to peer group for motivation and approvalUnconcerned about health and nutritionPolitically apatheticImage consciousSpend on clothing and personal care productsPrefer TV to Reading
  16. 16. Striver BuysChevroletPlayboyCoke ClassicLottery Ticket
  17. 17. ExperiencersExperiencers are motivated by self-expression. Young,enthusiastic and impulsive consumers. Experiencersquickly become enthusiastic about new possibilities butare equally quick to cool down.Like the new, offbeat and riskyLike exercise, socializing, sports and outdoorsConcerned about imageUn-conforming, but admire wealth, power and famePolitically apatheticFollow fashion and fadsSpend much of disposable income on socializingBuys on impulseAttend to advertisingListens to Rock Music
  18. 18. Experiencer BuysDesigner JeansElectric GuitarBranded and Stylish Sportswear
  19. 19. Makers Like Experiencers, Makers are motivated by self- expression. They express themselves and experience the world by working on it—building a house, raising children, fixing a car, or canning vegetables—and have enough skill and energy to carry out their projects successfully. Makers are practical people who have constructive skills and value self-sufficiency. They live within a traditional context of family, practical work and physical recreation and have little interest in what lies outside that context. Makers are suspicious of new ideas and large institutions such as big businesses.
  20. 20. Makers (contd.)They are respectful of government authority and organizedlabor but resentful of government intrusion on individualrights. They are unimpressed by material possessions otherthan those with a practical or functional purpose. Becausethey prefer value to luxury, they buy basic products.
  21. 21. Maker BuysComfortable Chair , CushionAir CoolersBasic Shirts ( Non luxury)Filmfare MagazineBudweiser BeerNASCAR
  22. 22. SurvivorsLimited interests and activitiesPrime concerns are safety and securityBurdened with health problemsConservative and traditionalRely on organized religionBrand loyalUse coupons and look out for salesTrust advertisingWatch TV oftenRead tabloids and womens magazines
  23. 23. Survivors (Contd)VERY LOW ON Ideals/Achievement/Self-ExpressionVERY LOW on resources and innovationSurvivors live narrowly focused lives. With few resourceswith which to cope, they often believe that the world ischanging too quickly. They are comfortable with thefamiliar and are primarily concerned with safety andsecurity.
  24. 24. Survivor BuysMedicinesMilk and BreadSodex Ho CouponsFemina
  25. 25. Remember  VALSPeople buy products, services and seek experiences thatfulfill their characteristic preferences and give shape,substance and satisfaction to their lives.•VALS Evolved to explain the relationship betweenpsychology and consumer behavior•VALS measures the persons ability to expresshimself/herself in the market place•VALS uses proprietary psychometric techniques tomeasure concepts that researchers have proved empiricallyto correlate with consumer  behavior.
  26. 26. References1. www.strategicbusinessinsight.com2. Wikipedia3. http://www.scribd.com/doc/22753864/VALS-Value- Attitude-Lifestyle-Survey4. http://www.d.umn.edu/~rvaidyan/mktg4731/vals2tbl .htm5. http://www.slideshare.net/clsmith652/buyer- behaviour-market-research-portfolio6. http://cla.calpoly.edu/legacies/rsimon/rsimonsite/Hu m410/VALS%20Advertising%20Theory.htm

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