Thom Kearney lookiing to the future PHAC KE forum Nov 2010 1

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  • The second presentation near the end of the day will Look to the future and provide a glimpse of how emerging social communication technologies could positively influence public health and chronic disease presentation. It will attempt to synthesize some of the discussion to that point and provide the basis for a lively plenary discussion leading to personal actions attendees can take when they return to work.
  • Concept borrowed from http://www.mangospring.com/engage_collaboration_suite
    Darwin image http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Charles_Darwin_01.jpg
    We cant predict the future but we do know change is happening faster.
  • Tools to self manage
  • Talk about SMS
  • “Most healthcare websites have a Privacy Policy. Naturally, we do too. But at PatientsLikeMe, we’re more excited about our Openness Philosophy. It may sound counterintuitive, but it’s what drives our groundbreaking concept.
    You see, we believe sharing your healthcare experiences and outcomes is good. Why? Because when patients share real-world data, collaboration on a global scale becomes possible. New treatments become possible. Most importantly, change becomes possible. At PatientsLikeMe, we are passionate about bringing people together for a greater purpose: speeding up the pace of research and fixing a broken healthcare system.”
    PatientsLikeMe, by encouraging patients to share data about themselves, is trying to reverse a strong cultural tradition of keeping such information private, and, said Shirky, “I don’t know if they’ll succeed.” But he emphasized that it’s the cultural and social changes rather than the tools that really make a difference. The tools are a means to the end, and social contracts are very powerful.
  • Clay Shirky also talks about PatientsLikeMe.com, a site that allows patients with chronic diseases to share their health information, both for personal advice, but also as participants in clinical trials. Patients Like Me only works because patients are willing to share their personal healthcare information, and that is a cultural shift from the strict privacy that usually surrounds information about your personal health. Patients participating in Patients Like Me obviously think that the benefits from sharing their personal healthcare information outweigh the risks.
  • Thom Kearney lookiing to the future PHAC KE forum Nov 2010 1

    1. 1. www.strategyguy.com 1 Looking to the future How social media and emerging communication technologies can positively influence public health and assist in chronic disease prevention. PHAC Knowledge Exchange Forum, November 24, 2010 Thom Kearney, @thomkearney www.nusum.wordpress.com
    2. 2. www.strategyguy.com 2 Outline 1. The meta change 2. The future information environment 3. Future perspectives 4. Some examples 5. PHAC’s role 6. Things to do 7. A closing thought
    3. 3. www.strategyguy.com 3 “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.” Charles Darwin Why collaborate?
    4. 4. www.strategyguy.com 4 The meta change Its as big as the industrial revolution – the dawn of a new era The cost of connecting continues to drop • Cognitive surplus becoming accessible • Many experiments underway First time in history we have had the capacity to self organize on a mass scale. Social media, Web 2.0, Gov 2.0, Health 2.0 …
    5. 5. www.strategyguy.com 5 Shift happens …Possibly the greatest failure of the current healthcare system is that it clearly doesn't engage a large part of the population. And when we don't think about our health we get unhealthy. Close to two-thirds (63.1 percent) of adult Americans are becoming overweight or obese, exercising less, and eating unhealthy foods. Compared to healthy-weight people, overweight and obese people have particularly unhealthy lifestyles--lifestyles that contribute to the skyrocketing rates of preventable diseases like diabetes and heart conditions, which are among the most costly public health afflictions. A population truly engaged in the issue of wellness would not act so recklessly with respect to its own wellbeing. To change that, we need to shift from a model of health care where patients are passive recipients of care only after they become sick to one in which one where patients become much more active in managing their own health over their lifespan. A main benefit, as studies show, is that when patients are more engaged in managing their own health, they are more committed to being healthy. Collaborative healthcare could not just improve health it could reduce costs of a system that is close to 20 percent of the GDP and acting as an anchor on the economy. Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams Macrowikinomics: Rebooting the Economy http://www.huffingtonpost.com/don- tapscott/macrowikinomics-rebooting_1_b_779701.html
    6. 6. www.strategyguy.com 6 The future Mobile – think apps not web sites Networks of people and things Widgets and linked data • Diverged & converged, networked, not linear Health info integrated with EHRS? Government amplifies grass roots initiatives
    7. 7. www.strategyguy.com 7 Health perspectives Patient Focus: • Rapid communications • Tools to self manage • Shared experiences Professional Focus: • Share and collaborate • Find radical efficiencies These will happen with, or without you These will only happen with your commitment.
    8. 8. www.strategyguy.com 8 Future is mobile
    9. 9. www.strategyguy.com 9 Tools to share experience
    10. 10. www.strategyguy.com 10 and to collectively learn “Will you add to our collective knowledge... and help change the course of healthcare?”
    11. 11. www.strategyguy.com 11 PHAC Roles? Trusted content source – scope (breadth vs depth) • Criteria – what makes a best practice? • Surveillance products • Synthesizer of diverse content Trusted connector Communicator – creator of widgets and aps? Facilitate and connect, play a broker role, help with Knowledge Exchange Partner in a national knowledge exchange platform?
    12. 12. www.strategyguy.com 12 A thought The great thing about enabling technologies is that they enable people. You are people. Consider yourself enabled.
    13. 13. www.strategyguy.com 13 Things to do 1. Find a new conversation online that is relevant to you. (twitter #publichealth) 2. Search for and join some communities that already exist in your area of interest 3. Learn – Create – Share 4. Look for similarities instead of differences Relevance = Trust = Engagement
    14. 14. www.strategyguy.com 14 Last question When I go back to the office I will: A. Share some of what I learned B. Change at least one thing in my routine C. Experiment with new ways of working D. Reinvent myself E. Do nothing
    15. 15. www.strategyguy.com 15 Thank you “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” Alan Kay Thom Kearney thomk@rogers.com www.strategyguy.com
    16. 16. www.strategyguy.com 16 Extra stuff
    17. 17. www.strategyguy.com 17 Plenary Discussion Idea 1 Brainstorm the types of materials and stories you could share with your colleagues Brainstorm ideas for Mass Collaboration or public engagement Mass Collaboration 100,000+ Small Group Collaboration < 25 More Technology Less
    18. 18. www.strategyguy.com 18 Plenary Discussion Idea 2 Discuss PHAC roles going forward: Trusted content source – scope (breadth vs depth) • Criteria – what makes a best practice? • Surveillance products • Synthesizer of diverse content Trusted connector Communicator – creator of widgets and aps? Facilitate and connect, play a broker role, help with Knowledge Exchange Partner in a national knowledge exchange platform?
    19. 19. www.strategyguy.com 19

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